Page images
PDF
EPUB

-

v. 11.

[ocr errors]

JOHNSON, SAMUEL-

Leading events of his life.
[1773] publishes new edition of his folio

Dictionary, i. 192.

writes preface to Macbean's Dic-
tionary of Ancient Geography,' and
Argument in Favour of Lay Patrons,
ii. 192.
at sixty-four, attempts to learn the
Low Dutch languages, ii. 247.
injures his eyesight by the impru-
dent use of small print, ii. 247.
his journey with Boswell to the He.
brides, ii. 250.
- presented with the freedom of Aber-

[1781) completes his Lives of the Poets,'

iv. 401.
loses his friend Mr. Thrale, iv. 459.
appointed one of his executors, iv.
457.
loses his friend Mr. Strahan, iv. 474.
plans a life of greater diligence, v. 7.
purposes to devote six weeks to the
study of Italian literature, v. 7.
visits Oxford, Birmingham, and

Lichfield, v. 7.
[1782] loses his old friend Robert Levett,

declining state of his health, v. 16.
visits Oxford, v. 30.
takes a parting adieu of Streatham ;
his prayer on leaving Mr. Thrale's
famly, v. 37.

reads a book of the Æneid every

night for twelve nights, v. 100.
[1783) attacked with a stroke of the palsy,

v. 109.
visits Lichfield and Oxford, v. 116.
institutes the Essex Head Club, v.
144.
seized with a spasmodic asthma, y.

146.
[1784) visits Oxford, v. 182.

his friends project a tour to Italy for
the benefit of his health, v. 234, 245,
261.
- visits Lichfield, Birmingham, and

Oxford for the last time, v. 268.
- his extraordinary expiatory visit to
Uttoxeter, v. 288, 288 n.

His last illness and dcath.
rapid increase of his disorders, v. 298.
his preparations for death, v. 304.
- particulars, by Boswell, of his re-
maining days, v. 310.

makes a liberal provision for his
negro servant, Francis Barber, v. 311.
- particulars, by Mr. Nichols, of his
conversation within a few days of his
death, v. 318.
- his three dying requests of Sir Joshua

Reynolds, v. 325.
- his great anxiety for the religious
improvement of his friends, v. 325.
particulars of Mr. Windham's last
interview with him, from his Private
Journal, v. 326.
· Sir John Hawkins's journal of the
last fortnight of his life, v. 333.
diary of his last illness by Mr.
Hoole, v. 464.

deen, ii. 324.
[1774) engaged in writing his 'Journey to

the Western Islands,' iii. 115.
makes a journey into North Wales
with Mr. and Mrs. Thrale, iii. 124.

spends some time with Mr. Burke
at Beaconsfield, iii. 159.

writes · The Patriot,' iii. 162.
(1775) publishes his “Journey to the

Western Islands of Scotland,' iii. 175.
publishes · Taxation no Tyranny,'
iii. 187.

receives his diploma as Doctor of
Laws from the University of Oxford,
iii. 205.
· makes a tour to France with Mr.

and Mrs. Thrale, iii. 264.
[1776) writes an Argument in support of

the Liberty of the Pulpit, Proposals
for an Analysis of the Scotch Celtick
Language, and a Defence of the
Booksellers from the Charge of
making exorbitant Profits, iii. 311.

pays a visit to Oxford and Lichfield,
iii. 326.
visits Bath with Mr. and Mrs. Thrale,

iii. 409.
[1777) engages with the booksellers to

write. The Lives of the English

Poets,' iii. 474.
– writes dedication to the king of the

Posthumous Works of Dr. Pearce,
iii. 476.

visits Oxford and Derbyshire, iii. 496.
-- exerts his humane and zealous in-

terference in behalf of Dr. Dodd,

iii. 503.
[1778] his visit to W'arley Camp, iv. 228.

his home made uncomfortable by the
perpetual jarrings of those whom he

sheltered under his roof, iv. 232.
[1779) publishes the first four volumes of

his · Prefaces, biographical and cri-
tical, to the most eminent of the En-

glish Poets,' iv. 237.
[1780) employed in the completion of the

"Lives of the Poets,' iv. 296.

particulars of his last moments, v.
343.
his DEATH, v. 344.
his Will, v. 346.
- his FUNERAL in Westminster Ab-
bey, v. 351, 352 n., 421.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

-

-

-

-

JOHNSON, SAMUEL-

His last illness and death.
his Monument in St. Paul's, v. 354,
354 n.
his Epitaph by Dr. Parr, v. 355,
356 n.
Chronological Catalogue of his
PROSE WORKS, V. 483.
List of various PORTRAITS of him,
v. 378.

List of various DESIGNS intended
to be executed by him, v. 374.
his general character by Boswell,
v. 357.
- his character by Dr. Horne, Bishop
of Norwich, v. 461.

Mr. Courtenay's Poetical Review of
his literary and moral character, v.
445.
· Verses summing up his character
by Mrs. Piozzi, iv. 427.
Sepulchral Verses on him by Mr.
Flood, v. 354.
- RECOLLECTIONS of him by Miss

his remarkable laugh, iii. 254.
the extreme heat and irritability of
his blood, v. 68.
- his corporeal defects contributed to
the singularity of his manners, iv.
200.

his dress, ii. 257 ; iv. 184.
general traits of his character and
mode of living, i. 20, 23, 27, 28, 46,
63, 65, 86, 100, 113, 114, 136, 143,
164, 178, 228, 236, 376; ii. 254,
535.

-

Reynolds, v. 384.
- MISCELLANEOUS ANECDOTES of

him
by Mr. Cumberland, v. 398.
by Lord Chedworth, v. 404.
by Mr. Wickens of Lichfield, v. 405.
by the Rev. Mr. Parker, v. 409.
by Mrs. Rose, v. 413.
by Dr. Parr, v. 414.
by Mr. Robert Barclay, v. 414.
by Miss Hawkins, v. 415.
by Mr. George Steevens, v. 416.
by Mrs. Piozzi, v. 422.
- MISCELLANEOUS LETTERS, V.
428.

his morbid melancholy, i. 34, 116,
282, 284, 333, 495, 514; ii. 46,
110, 255, 435; iii. 329, 371, 461;
iv. 25, 292, 301, 354; v. 119,
199.
his mind preserved from insanity by
his devotional aspirations, iv. 27.

his resort to arithmetic when his fancy
was disordered, iv. 392.

his uncouth habits, iii. 112.
- his occasional rudeness und violence
of temper, iii. 65 n., 66 n., 77, 143,
346, 413, 427, 443; iv. 20, 148,
200, 255, 345, 360, 369, 376, 384 n.,
417, 469, 487.

his readiness to take offence at any
slight, iv. 558.
- his notions about eating, i. 480,
481, 482; ii. 258 ; iv. 164; v. 304,
305, 305 n.
- his mode of drinking wine, i. 482 ;
iii. 407, 407 n.
his ten years' forbearance from all
fluids but tea and sherbet, iii. 407.
- his respect for birth and family, i.

389.

* Leading points of his habits, manners,

and character.
his peculiarities of person and man-
ner, i. 14, 21, 22, 23, 41, 61, 63, 68,
115, 116, 167, 254, 302, 496, 497 ; ii.
13, 68, 254, 255, 295 n., 534; iii.
112, 143 n., 419.
- his very imperfect sight, iii. 286 n.,
419; iv. 384, 396.
- his inability to discriminate features,
iv. 200.
- his defective hearing, and his un-
accommodating manners ascribed
thereto, iv, 200, 354.
his extraordinary gesticulations, ii.
256 ; iii. 200; iv. 380, 441 n.
his peculiar march, iv. 441.
his loud and imperious tone of voice,
iv. 201.

- his profound reverence for the hier.
archy, iv. 444.
his bow to an archbishop, v. 75.
his insensibility to the charms of
music, i. 355 ; ii. 8; iii. 295.
and to the beauties of paintings, i.
355 ; v. 217.
his alleged superstition, i. 496; ii.
141 n. ; v. 153.
his personal courage, iii. 174.
his great love of late hours, iv. 56.
his disregard of public abuse, iv.
245, 361, 424, 435.
his abhorrence of affectation, iv. 358.
his diligent study of medicine, v. 16.
his love of chymistry, iv. 272.
his extensive knowledge of literary
history, iv. 37.
- his alleged deficiency in Greek, i.
300, 300 n., 301 n., 302, 302 n.

wonderful power and extent of his
memory, i. 12, 23, 250, 300.
his political prejudices, i. 114.
his prejudice against the Scotch, ii.
257; ii, 181, 18) n.

JOHNSON, SAMUEL
Leading points of his habits, manners,

and character.
his unjust contempt for foreigners,
iv. 347.
- his oratorical powers, ii. 126.
- his great conversational powers, i.
164, 301, 374; ii. 251 ; iv. 484, 490;
v. 12).
- his great dexterity at retort, v. 63.
- his bow wow way of speaking, iii.
201 n.
- his extraordinary readiness of wit,
iii. 433.
- his mode of reading prose and verse,
iv. 50.
- his rule always to talk his best, v. 62.
- his great talent for humour, i. 165.
- his powers of improvisation, iii. 460.
- his dislike to be teased with questions,
iv. 123.
- extraordinary fertility of his mind,
i. 182.

at sixty-seven purposes to apply vi.
gorously to the Greek and Italian
languages, iii. 454.
· his style characterized, i. 195, 195 n.,
198, 200, 201; iv. 113, 406, 428.

various imitations of, v. 362.
- his objection to the use of paren-
theses, v. 68.
- his writing, whether for the public,
or privately to his friends, by fits and
starts, v. 284.

his extraordinary powers of composi-
tion, i. 167, 178, 300; ii. 301, 302,
342; iii. 219, 425 n. ; iv. 401, 502.

the Ramblers' written as they were
wanted for the press, i. 178 ; iii. 408.

wrote a hundred lines of the · Vanity
of Human Wishes' in a day, ii. 15.
- wrote his "False Alarm' in twenty-

eight hours, ii. 116.

wrote a sermon after dinner, and sent
it off by the post that night, ii. 302.

wrote forty-eight pages of the Life
of Savage at a sitting, ii. 302.

wrote six sheets of translation from
the French in one day, ii. 302.
wrote “The Patriot' in one day, üi.
164.
- his general tenderness of nature, hu.
manity, and affability, i. 20, 50, 86,
136, 219, 220, 289, 303, 326, 327,
342, 343, 365, 381, 499; ii. 43; iii.
260, 486; iv. 132, 165, 208; v. 219,
243.
- his cardour and amiableness of dis.
position, iii. 197.
his gratitude for kindness conferred,
i. 502.
- his active benevolence, iii. 199.

his uncommon kindness to his ser-
vants, v. 74.
- his constancy to those whom he once
employed, v. 215.
- his great distress at the loss of his
friends, iv. 240.
- his fondness for animals under his
protection, v. 74.
his inexhaustible charity, iii. 489 ;

iv. 77, 269 n., 397; v. 182.
- his love of the poor, i. 366, 377,
430; v. 2.
his kindness to authors in looking
over their works and suggesting im-
provements, iv. 243.
his rigid honesty, i. 45.

his early, habitual, and systematic
piety, i. 10, 38, 63, 114, 289, 326...
his inviolable regard to truth, i. 125,
127, 302, 450 ; iii. 320; iv. 83.

never greedy of money, but without
money could not be stimulated to
write, i, 113, 309.
his hatred of disguise, iv. 372.
his fixed incredulity of every thing
he heard, iv. 386, 386 1..

his kindness to children, i. 20; iii.
394 vi. ; v. 74.

his confidence in the efficacy of
prayer, ii. 203, 334.
his habitual endeavour to refer every
transaction of his life to the will of the
Supreme Being, v. 295.

his awful dread of death, ii. 92, 109;
iii. 76, 173, 519; iv. 153; v. 150,
151, 175, 188.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

Johnson, Charles, author of Adven.

ventures of a Guinea,' ii. 500.
- Samuel, author of · Hurlo Thrumbo,'
ii. 523 n.

- the equestrian, i. 408.
· Johnsoniana,' the collection so called,

iii. 319, 319 n. ; iv. 184.
Johnston, Arthur, his poems, i. 471 ; ii.

328; v. 159.
some account of, ii. 328.

Sir James, v. 179.
Jones, Sir William, i. 384; ii. 342; iv.

258, 299, 309 n., 393, 439 n., 489.
· Philip, iii. 333, 333 n.

· Miss, i. 312.
Jonson, Ben, iii. 97.
Jorden, Rev. Mr., i. 30, 31, 32, 48 n.
Jortin, Rev. Dr. John, his · Sermons,' iv.

103; v. 229.
some account of, v. 39 n.
his laconicepitaph in Kensington church-

yard, v. 39 n.
Journal, or diary, of life, its utility, i.

448 ; ii. 204; iii. 233 ; v. 56.
- Johnson's advice to a young lady on

keeping one, iv. 71.

[ocr errors]

K.

Jubilee, . 71.

Kings, their situation, i. 437, 454; ii.
Judges, private life of, iii. 92.

38, 456; iv. 417.
- trading, iii. 218.

King's-Head Club, i. 163.
why they should not hold their places Kippis, Dr. Andrew, ii. 127 n., 323 n.;
for life, iii. 229.

iv. 25, 25 n.
Judgment, iii. 236.

- his biographical catechism, v. 292.
Junius, ii. 121, 122; iv. 246; v. 201. Knapton, Messrs., the booksellers, i. 157.
Justamond, John Obadiah, iii. 472 n. Kneller, Sir Godfrey, iv. 92, 92 n.
Juvenal, iii. 56; iv. 111, 224.

Knight, Lady, i. 214, 221; ü. 25.
- Halliday's notes on, Johnson's high her description of Johnson's political
opinion of, v. 332.

principles, i. 214 n.
- her account of Mrs. Williams, i. 221 ;

ii. 25 n.
Knitting, iv. 97 ; v. 183.

Johnson's attempt to learn, iii. 233 n.
Kaimes, Henry Home, Lord, i. 119; Knowledge, i. 430; ii. 209 n.; iii. 233,
ii. 54, 90, 189, 498; ii. 62.

336, 401; iv. 194.
- his Elements of Criticism,' i. 403; every day, the best, iv. 19.
iv. 102.

Knowles, Mrs. Mary, the quakeress, iii.
- his “Sketches of Man,' iv. 102, 206, 440, 442; iv. 143, 145, 147, 152.
219.

- her dialogue with Johnson respecting
Kearney, Rev. Dr. Michael, i. 144 n.; the quakers, iv. 157, 157 n.
iv. 122 n., 183 n., 278, 442 n.

Knox, John, the reformer, ii. 297.
Kearsley, Mr., the bookseller, i. 190; iv. Rev. Vicesimus, an imitator of John-

son's style, i. 198 n.; v 239.
Kedleston, the seat of Lord Scardale, iii. Mr. John, a bookseller, his account of
129; iv. 8.

Johnson's Journey to the Hebrides,'
Kellie, Thomas, sixth Earl of, iv. 20 n., iii. 179.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

441 n.

[ocr errors]

190 n.

L.

Kelly, Hugh, iii. 478, 479; v. 227.

· Johnson's prologue to his Word to

the Wise,' jii. 478.
- some account of, v. 321 n.
Kemble, John Philip, v. 130, 132 n.

some account of, v. 130 n.
Charles, v. 131 n.
Kempis, Thomas à, iv. 81, 81 n.
Ken, Bishop, iv. 17 n. ; v. 186 n.
Kennedy, Rev. Dr., Johnson's dedication

to his "Astronomical Chronology,' i.
356.

Dr., his tragedy, iv. 94.
Kennicot, Dr. Benjamin, his Collations,

i. 386; ii. 277.
- some account of, i. 386 n.
Kenrick, Dr. William, his attack on

Johnson's Shakspeare, i. 516; ii. 63,

499, 499 n. ; iv. 112.
Kepple, Lady Elizabeth, ii. 94.
Kerr, Mr. James, ii. 275.
Kettel, Dr. Ralph, i. 257.
Kilmorey, John, tenth Viscount, iii. 131 ;

iv. 207; v. 134.
Kindersley, Mr., v. 128.
Kindness, v. 32; iv. 33.
King, Rev. Dr., i. 266, 268 n., 337; iii.

Labefactation of all principles in the

• Beggars' Opera,' ïi. 242.
La Bruyère, iii. 234 n.
Lactantius, iii. 496.
Lade, Sir John, Johnson's advice to his

mother, iv. 19.
- some account of, iv. 19 n.

Johnson's verses on his coming of age,

v. 324.
Laertius, Diogenes, iv. 345.
Land, iii. 382.
Landlords, ii. 103, 425, 456, 521, 532 ;

iv. 104.
Langley, Rev. Mr., iii. 128.

Charles, esq., the husband of Alley

Croker,' iv. 107 n.
Langton, Bennet, esq., i. 19, 78, 231,

249, 322, 347, 370, 487 n., 489, 490;
ii. 16, 17, 45, 64, 69 n., 85, 122,
231 n., 239 n., 245 11., 249 n., 323 n.,
341, 438 ; iii. 122, 123, 174, 236, 252,

343 n., 411 n., 457, 467,
iv. 9, 37 n., 76, 105, 116, 137, 158 n.,
174 n., 177 n., 215 n., 227, 31), 448,
470; v. 114, 116, 126, 177, 317.
some account of, i. 231 n.; v. 317.
Johnson's letters to, i. 273, 313, 322,
323, 347 ; ii. 16, 17, 45, 122, 133,
137; iii. 123, 237, 252, 487; iv.

320 1.2

492

239 n.
on the happiness of a future state,

iv. 147.
- Archbishop, his · Essay on Evil,' iv.

276 n.
some account of, i. 266 n.
Lord, his · Life of Locke,' i. 466.

232; v. 2, 17, 126, 161, 267, 276.
- his Collectanea of Johnson's sayings,

iv. 333.

n.;

[ocr errors]

Langton, Miss Jane, v. 168.

Johnson's letter to, ii. 129.
Peregrine, esq., his admirable and

Lay patronage, Johnson's argument in

defence of, ii. 546.
Laziness, ii. 455; iii. 389, 397.
Lea, Rev. Samuel, i. 26.
Learning, ii. 294, 314; iii. 73, 239.
- more universally diffused than formerly,

v. 98.
Leasowes, iii. 157.
Lectures, on the practice of teaching by,

ii. 7 ; iv. 466.
Lee, Alderman, iii. 440, 440 n.

Arthur, esq., iii. 431.

John, esq. the barrister, iv. 79, 79 n.
Leechman, Dr. William, ii. 303; iii. 65.

his work on prayer, ii. 303, 303 1.
Leeds, Francis, fifth Earl of, lines on his

marriage, iv. 346.
Legitimation by subsequent marriage, iii.

344, 344 n.
Leibnitz, ii. 148, 514.
Leicester, Robert Dudley, Earl of, iii. 137.
Leisure, the source of intellectual improve-

ment, ii. 207.
Leith, ii. 289.
Leland, Rev. Dr. Thomas, i. 503; ii. 240;

iii. 476 ; iv. 167.
Leland's 'Itinerary,' iii. 144 n.
Lenox, Mrs. Charlotte, i. 208, 243, 287,

336, 356 ; iii. 165 ; iv. 341; v. 172.
- Johnson writes • Proposal for pub-

lishing her works, iii. 165.
· Leonidas,' Glover's, ii. 348.
Leslie, Charles, v. 186 n.

some account of, v. 186 n.
Letter-writing, iv. 476.
Letters, the sanctity of private, ii. 59.

none received in the grave,' v. 469.
Levellers, i. 460.
Lever, Sir Ashton, v. 243, 243 n.
Levett, Mr. Robert, i. 136 n., 137, 175,

217; ii. 4, 201; iv. 2, 73, 181, 231,
243, 288, 466 ; v. 99, 113.
- Johnson's letters to, iii. 145, 264, 456.
his death, v. 11.

Johnson's verses to the memory of, v. 11.
Lewis, David, his lines to Pope, v. 203,

203 n.
some account of, v. 203 n.

Mr. F., i. 202.
Lexicography, more difficult of execution

than poetry, iii. 526.

Lexiphanes, Campbell's, ii. 44.
Libels, ii. 523 ; iii. 319, 380, 464.

genteel economy, ii. 17 n.
Bishop, i. 232 n.
Language, v. 100.
- origin of, v. 84.

of an ancient author, not to be modern-

ised, v. 212.
- on writing verses in a dead, iii. 246.
Languages, i. 469 ; ii. 28, 82, 148 ; ii.
291, 400.

Irish and Gaelic, the same, ii. 149, 149 n.
- Chinese, iv. 205.
· Irish, ii. 149.
- poets the preservers of, iii. 400.

the pedigree of nations, ii. 448.
Lapidary inscriptions, inaccuracy of, iv.

238.
Lascaris's Grammar, the first book printed

in the Greek character, iii. 158 n.
Latin epitaphs, ii. 384 n.
La Trobe, Rev. Mr., v. 322, 322 n., 472.
Laud, Archbishop, his Diary, ii. 201.
Lauder, William, his forgery against

Milton, i. 205 ; iv. 409.
Lauderdale, Earl of, ii. 336; iii. 387.
• Laughers,' the, utility of associating with,

v. 61.
Laurel, the, i. 160 n.
Law, iii. 316.

profession of, iv. 30, 31 n.
Johnson's intention of studying, i. 504.
his opinions as to the study and practice
of, ii. 9, 20, 48, 202, 262, 283, 321,
540, 542,546; iii. 247, 316, 386, 424,
466 ; iv. 30, 213, 376, 444, 478.
arguments on several cases, ii. 179, 540.
See Argument.
- Cicero's defence of the study of, ii. 49 n.
Law, Dr. Edmond, Bishop of Carlisle, iv.
294, 294 n.
William, v. 186 n., 194.
his Serious Call' the first occasion of
Johnson's thinking in earnest of re-
ligion, i. 39; iv. 555.
the finest piece of hortatory theology

in any language, i. 381.

some account of, i. 381 n.
Lawrence, Sir Thomas, i. 324 n.
- Dr. Thomas, i. 325; iii. 171 n., 387,

460; iv. 297, 303, 304, 320, 468 ;
v. 15, 21, 99, 109.
Johnson's letters to, iii. 171; iv. 297;

v. 16, 17 n.
- Johnson's letters to his daughter, v. 17 n.

his death, v. 16, 109 n.
Laws, iii. 302, 390.
Lawyers, ii. 10; iv. 165, 444.
- not to be censured for multiplying

words, iv. 444.
- on their soliciting practice, iii. 317.
Lawyers, Sunday consultations of, iii. 249.

from the pulpit, iii. 425.
- on the character of the dead, iii. 380.
Liberty, ii. 62, 233; iv. 77, 254.

political, ii. 62.
- of conscience, ii. 234.

of conscience and liberty of teaching,
distinction between, v. 96.
of the press, ii. 62; iii. 380.

of the pulpit, iii. 425.
- and necessity, iv. 440.

-

6

« PreviousContinue »