The Writings of James Madison: 1769-1783

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G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1900
 

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Page 35 - A DECLARATION OF RIGHTS, made by the representatives of the good people of VIRGINIA, assembled in full and free convention ; which rights do pertain to them, and their posterity, as the basis and foundation of Government. 1. That all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights...
Page 29 - There runs not a drop of my blood in the veins of any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it; I have killed many; I have fully glutted my vengeance. For my country, I rejoice at the beams of peace; but do not harbor a thought that mine is the joy of fear.
Page 40 - That religion or the duty which we owe to our Creator, and the manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence ; and, therefore, all men are equally entitled to the free exercise of religion, according to the dictates of conscience ; and that it is the mutual duty of all to practice Christian forbearance, love and charity towards each other.
Page 40 - Because we hold it for a fundamental and undeniable truth, "that Religion or the duty which we owe to our Creator and the Manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence.
Page 42 - that the legislative, executive, and judiciary departments shall be separate and distinct; so that neither exercise the powers properly belonging to the other...
Page 38 - That in all capital or criminal prosecutions, a man hath a right to demand the cause and nature of his accusation...
Page 37 - That elections of members to serve as representatives of the people in assembly, ought to be free ; and that all men having sufficient evidence of permanent common interest with, and attachment to the community, have the right of suffrage...
Page 40 - That no free government, or the blessings of liberty, can be preserved to any people, but by a firm adherence to justice, moderation, temperance, frugality, and virtue, and by frequent recurrence to fundamental principles.
Page 39 - That the freedom of the press is one of the great bulwarks of liberty, and can never be restrained but by despotic governments.
Page 395 - ... and welfare of the United States, or any of them, nor emit bills, nor borrow money on the credit of the United States, nor appropriate money, nor agree upon the number of vessels of war, to be built or purchased...

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