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PEARSON. Facts about Milk. United States Department of Agriculture, Farmers' Bulletin 42 (1906).

SHERMAN. Seasonal Variations in the Composition of Cows' Milk. Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. 28, pages 1719–1723 (1906). Sanitary Milk Production. Report of a Conference appointed by the Commissioners of the District of Columbia. United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Animal Industry, Circular 114 (1907).

Corr. The Origin, General Plan, and Scope of the Medical Milk Commission. Proceedings of the American Association of Medical Milk Commissions, Vol. 1, pages 10-17 (1908).

HAECKER. Investigation in Milk Production. Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station, Bulletin 106, pages 147-169 (1908).

KASTLE.

On the Available Alkali in the Ash of Human and Cows' Milk and its Relation to Infant Nutrition. American Journal of Physiology, Vol. 22, pages 284-308 (1908).

PENNINGTON. Bacterial Growth and Chemical Changes in Milk kept at Low Temperatures. Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 4, pages 353-393 (1908).

VAN SLYKE. Conditions affecting the Proportions of Fat and Proteins in Cows' Milk. Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. 30, pages 1166-1186 (1908).

COLWELL and SHERMAN. Chemical Evidence of Peptonization in Raw and Pasteurized Milk. Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 5, pages 247251 (1909).

AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION. Standard Methods for the Bacterial Examination of Milk. American Journal of Public Hygiene, August, 1910. Also available in reprint form.

HARDING, WILSON and SMITH. The Modern Milk Pail. New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Bulletin 326 (1910).

KERR. The History, Development, and Statistics of Milk Charities in the United States. United States Public Health Service, Public Health Reports, Vol. 25, pages 1351-1367 (1910).

LANE and PARKS. Improved Methods for the Production of Market Milk by Ordinary Dairies. United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Animal Industry, Circular 158 (1910).

Proceedings, Conference on Milk Problems held in New York City, December, 1910. Published by the New York Milk Committee (1910-1911). AYERS and JOHNSON. Bacteriology of Commercially Pasteurized and Raw Market Milk. United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Animal Industry, Bulletin 126 (1911).

ECKLES and REED. Causes of Variation in Milk Production by Dairy Cows. Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station, Research Bulletin 2 (1911). FINGERLING. Influence of Food Poor in Calcium and Phosphorus upon Milk Production. Landwirtschaftliches Versuchs-Stationen, Vol. 75, pages 1-152 (1911).

HARDING. Publicity and Payment based on Quality as Factors in Improving a City Milk Supply. New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Bulletin 337 (1911).

LINDSEY. Influence of Protein Feeding on Milk Production. Massachusett
Agricultural Experiment Station, Report 23, Part 3, pages 86-121
(1911).
LUXWOLDA.

Growth and Action of Certain Milk Bacteria at Different
Temperatures. Centralblatt für Bakteriologie und Parasitenkunde,
II Abth., Vol. 31, pages 129-175 (1911).

MILNER. The Use of Milk as Food. United States Department of Agriculture, Farmers' Bulletin 363 (1911).

NEW YORK MILK COMMITTEE. Completion of a Successful Practical Experiment in Milk Production. 5th Annual Report, pages 25-30 (1911). NORTH. Pasteurization of Milk in the Bottle on a Commercial Scale. Medical Record, July 15, 1911.

SCHÖLBERG and WALLIS. Chemical Changes produced in Milk by Bacteria and their Relation to the Epidemic Diarrhea of Infants. Local Governments Boards Medical Officers Report, 1911, pages 504-543 (1911). WHITAKER. The Extra Cost of Producing Clean Milk. United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Animal Industry, Circular 170 (1911).

AYERS. The Pasteurization of Milk. United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Animal Industry, Circular 184 (1912).

HOPKINS. Influence of Accessory Constituents of Diet upon Growth. Journal of Physiology, Vol. 44, pages 425-460 (1912).

JORDAN. The Case for Pasteurization. Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 59, pages 1450-1457 (1912).

NEW YORK MILK COMMITTEE. Infant Mortality and Milk Stations. Special Report (1912).

Report of the Commission on Milk Standards. United States Public Health Service, Public Health Reports, Reprint No. 78 (1912).

ROGERS. Bacteria in Milk. United States Department of Agriculture, Farmers' Bulletin 490 (1912).

ROGERS and DAVIS. Methods of Classifying the Lactic Acid Bacteria. United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Animal Industry, Bulletin 154 (1912).

ROGERS. Directions for the Home Pasteurization of Milk. United States
Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Animal Industry, Circular 197
(1912).
SCHORER. Experimental Studies on Milk, with Especial Reference to the
Uniformity of Different Grades of Milk and the Effects of Storage upon
Certified, Inspected, and Pasteurized Milks. Journal of Infectious
Diseases, Vol. 11, pages 295-337 (1912).

AYERS and JOHNSON. A Study of the Bacteria which Survive Pasteurization.
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Animal Industry,
Bulletin 161 (1913).

ECKLES and SHAW. Influence of Breed and Individuality and the Stage of Lactation upon the Composition and Properties of Milk. United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Animal Industry, Bulletins 155, 156, 157 (1913).

LYTHGOE. Quality of the Massachusetts Milk Supply as shown by the Inspection of the State Board of Health. Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, Vol. 5, pages 922–927 (1913).

MEIGS and MARSH. The Comparative Composition of Human Milk and of Cows' Milk. Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 16, pages 147-168 (1913).

SCHRYVER. On the Clotting of Milk. Proceedings of the Royal Society, London, Series B, Vol. 86, pages 460-481 (1913).

UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE. Second Report of Commission on Milk Standards. Public Health Reports, Vol. 28, pages 1733-1756 (August 22, 1913).

WING. Milking Machines: Their Sterilization and their Efficiency in Producing Clean Milk. Cornell Experiment Station, Circular 18, pages 65-74 (1913).

BOWEN. The Cost of Pasteurizing Milk and Cream. United States Department of Agriculture, Bulletin 85 (1914).

KUDLICH and SACHS. Biological Reactions of Raw and Cooked Milk. Zeitschrift für Immunitâtsforschung und experimentelle Therapie, Vol. 20, pages 317-335 (1914).

MCCOLLUM.

The Value of the Proteins of the Cereal Grains and of Milk for Growth. Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 20, pages 323-334 (1914).

PALMER and ECKLES. Carotin, the Principal Natural Yellow Pigment of Milk Fat. Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 17, pages 191-250 (1914).

PALMER and COOLEDGE. Lactochrome, the Yellow Pigment of Milk Whey. Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 17, pages 251–264 (1914).

AYERS. The Present Status of Pasteurization of Milk. United States Department of Agriculture, Bulletin 342 (1915).

AYERS and JOHNSON. Pasteurizing Milk in Bottles and Bottling Hot Milk Pasteurized in Bulk. United States Department of Agriculture, Bulletin 24o (1915).

AYRES and RUPP. Alkali-forming Bacteria Found in Milk. Science, Vol.
42, pages 318-319 (1915).
OSBORNE, VAN SLYKE, LEAVENWORTH, and VINOGRAD. Some Products of
Hydrolysis of Gliadin, Lactalbumin, and the Protein of the Rice Kernel.
Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 22, pages 259–280 (1915).
OSBORNE and WAKEMAN. Some New Constituents of Milk. First Paper.
The Phosphatides of Milk. Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 21,
pages 539-550 (1915).

VAN SLYKE and BOSWORTH. Condition of Casein and Salts in Milk. Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 20, pages 135-152 (1915).

BOSWORTH and VAN SLYKE. A Comparison of the Composition of Cows' Milk, Goats' Milk and Human Milk. Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 24, pages 187-190 (1916).

HOLT. Digestion of the Proteins of Milk and their Rôle in Infant Nutrition. Archives of Pediatrics, Vol. 33, pages 13-19 (1916).

OSBORNE and WAKEMAN. Some New Constituents of Milk. Second Paper. The Distribution of Phosphatides in Milk. Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 28, pages 1-10 (1916).

BROWN and EKROTH. Chemical Quality of New York City Market Milk. Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, Vol. 9, pages 299-301 (1917).

ECKLES and PALMER. Influence of the Age of the Cow on the Composition

and Properties of Milk and Milk Fat. Journal of Agricultural Research, Vol. 11, pages 645-658 (1917). Chemical Abstracts, Vol. 13, page 2936. HARDING, BREED, STOCKING, and HASTINGS. What is Meant by Quality in Milk? Journal of Dairy Science, Vol. 1, pages 199-217 (1917). JORDAN and SMITH. Goats' Milk for Infant Feeding. New York Agricultural Experiment Station (Geneva), Bulletin 429 (1917).

HART and STEENBOCK. Milk Necessary for the Nation's Welfare. Wisconsin Agricultural Experiment Station, Bulletin 291 (1918).

OSBORNE and WAKEMAN. The Proteins of Cows' Milk. Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 33, pages 7-18, 243–252 (1918).

RUEHLE, BREED, and SMITH. Milking Machines: III, As a Source of Bacteria in Milk; IV, Methods of Maintaining in a Bacteria-free Condition. New York State Agricultural Experiment Station (Geneva), Bulletin 450, pages 113-181 (1918).

SHERMAN. Place of Milk and Vegetables in the Diet. American Medicine, Vol. 13, pages 361-369 (1918).

BAILEY. The Babcock Test for Butter Fat in Milk. Journal of Dairy Science, Vol. 2, pages 331-373 (1919).

EMMETT and LUROS. Is Lactalbumin a Complete Protein for Growth? Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 38, pages 147-160 (1919).

-. The Stability of Lactalbumin to Heat. Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 38, pages 257-266 (1919).

FERRY. The Food Value of Milk. Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, Bulletin 215, 30 pages (1919).

HASTINGS. Comparative Value of Qualitative and Quantitative Bacteriological Methods as Applied to Milk with Special Consideration of the Methylene Blue Reduction Test. Journal of Dairy Science, Vol. 2, pages 293-311 (1919).

PALMER and SCOTT. The Physico-chemical State of the Proteins in Cows' Milk. Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 37, pages 271-284 (1919).

SMITH. Observations on the Pasteurization and Subsequent Handling of Milk in City Milk Plants. Journal of Dairy Science, Vol. 2, pages 487-503 (1919).

VAN SLYKE and BOSWORTH.

The State of Proteins in Cows' Milk. Jour

nal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 37, pages 285-286 (1919).

BAIN and POSSON. Requirements and Cost of Producing Market Milk in Northwestern Indiana. United States Department of Agriculture, Bulletin 858 (1920).

BREED and STOCKING. The Accuracy of Bacterial Counts from Milk Samples. New York Agricultural Experiment Station (Geneva), Technical Bulletin 75 (192o).

BRIGHT. Milking Machines: V, The Production of High Grade Milk with Milking Machines under Farm Conditions. New York Agricultural Experiment Station (Geneva), Bulletin 472 (1920).

DUTCHER, ECKLES, DAHLE, MEAD, and SCHAEFER. The Influence of Diet of the Cow upon the Nutritive and Antiscorbutic Properties of Cows' Milk. Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 45, pages 119–132 (1920). HART, STEENBOCK, and ELLIS. Influence of Diet on the Antiscorbutic Potency of Milk. Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 42, pages 383396 (1920).

HASTINGS and DAVENPORT. The Relative Value of the Methylene Blue Reduction Test, the Bromothymol Blue Test and the Bromocresol Purple Test in Determining the Keeping Quality of Milk. Journal of Dairy Science, Vol. 3, pages 353–366 (1920).

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