Page images
PDF
EPUB
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

Boston, December 28, 1894. To the Inspectors of Prisons for Suffolk County :

GENTLEMEN : There were present at the date of your last visit, June 28, 1894:

Males.

Females.

Total.

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

4
1

Of those (lischarged, there were :
Recovered
Much improved
Improved
Not improved
Transferred
Died

13 2 2 8 8 26

هه لا ا د ا د

5 3 20

Of the deaths, one each were from old age, organic braiq disease, secondary dementia, caries of the foot, cerebral hemorrhage and polypi of bladder ; two were from chronic interstitial nephritis, three were from phthisis pulmonalis, four were from heart disease, five were from general paralysis, and six were from senile insanity.

Very l'espectfully,

T. W. FISHER,

Superintenrlent.

MARCELLA-STREET HOME.

Boston HIGHLANDS, December 28, 1894. To the Committee on Inspection of Prisons :

GENTLEMEN : The following is a report of the commitments and discharges since the date of your last inspection, June 23, 1894 : Namber remaining June 23, 1894

402 Number admitted between June 23, 1894, and December 28, 1894

185 Number discharged between June 23, 1894, and December 28, 1894

148 Number remaining December 28, 1894

439 of deaths

5 pardoned

13

O

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors]
[graphic][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

IN COMMON Council, January 3, 1895. Mr. Holden presented the following resolution :

Resolved. That the thanks of the Common Council of the City of Boston are due and are hereby tendered to President ChrisTOPHER F O'BRIEN, for the fidelity and ability with which he has discharged his duties during the municipal year now about to close; and his associates take advantage of this occasion to cordially offer him their best wishes for a future

of prosperity and happiness.

Career

Siid resolution was read.

Remarks were made by Messrs. Holden, Norris, Patterson, M. W. Collins, Callahan, Robinson, Rourke, King, Kelly, W. W. Davis, Sear's, Reidy, Everett, Marnell, Miller, Briggs, Jones, Cochran, Whelton, ('onnorton, Colby, Shaw, Browne, Leary, Bradley, Battis, and Hurley.

The resolution was then passed by a rising vote, the question being put by the Clerk of the Common Council.

The President addressed the Council in reply to the resolution, and on motion of Mr. Holden it was

Ordered, That the President be requested to furnish a copy of his closing address, that the same may be printed and bound with the city documents.

Attest:

JOSEPII O'KANE,
Clerk of the Common Council.

ADDRESS OF PRESIDENT O'BRIEN.

Mr. Clerk and gentlemen of the Common Council, after the after the passage

of the resolutions and the many kind remarks that have accompanied them, it is fitting that I should say something to you to express to you my feelings. And first, to speak generally, I wish to congratulate the members of the Common Council on the splendid work you have done in the term just drawing to a close. The many measures of importance that have been before you for action have been acted on promptly, yet not with undue haste; and although debate has often been spirited and feeling sometimes ran high, I believe that this Council has always so conducted itself as to preserve the high reputation which the Common Council as an institution has always deservedly borne among all people, except the few who do not truly understand its purpose or its usefulness. Your' votes have always represented the wishes of your

a

ever

particular constituency, and the action of the Council has always been satisfactory to the citizens as

whole. Much, valuable work has been done which is not apparent to the general public, but I know, as do many others, of the carnest, faithful, and painstaking work performed hy members of the different committees, both standing and special. For myself I thank you for your kindly words and action at this our closing session; and in all sincerity I thank you for your assistance in the conduct of our meetings. Coming to the chair, as was said by one member to-night, with youth and with perhaps less experience than any of the members of this Council appreciated – because it was the first time, when I assumed the duties of President of this Council, that I had

filled the chair at any regularly constituted parliamentary body - coming as I did without previous experience, I said then that I would endeavor to be a presiding officer impartial and dignified. This promise, to the best of my ability, I have kept. If I have failed, you have judged me, and most of you with marked tolerance for my failings. Almost at the outset I found that there was much dissatisfaction, particularly, perhaps, on account of my committee appointments. Much warmth of feeling was displayed. I was advised by a member of this Council that if I would say that I was sorry for alleged mistakes, affairs would probably go more smoothly. I believe that gentleman spoke in friendly spirit, for my good. I thanked him, and I do now; but if made mistakes they were honest mistakes, and I could not say I was sorry for what I honestly did for the best, although the result might have been unfortunate. If it has been unfortunate in some instances, it has not been wholly so for

for me, because I have learned from that experience a great deal.

While some bitter feeling was then engendered, I believe it las now almost entirely disappeared.

[ocr errors]
« PreviousContinue »