The Correspondence of the Late John Wilkes: With His Friends, Volume 3

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R. Phillips, 1805
 

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Page 170 - God for those very verses, at a time when I was absent, and dangerously ill from an affair of honour. The charge too he knew was false, for the whole ridicule of those two pieces was confined to certain mysteries, which formerly the unplaced and unpensioned Mr. Pitt did not think himself obliged even to affect to believe. He added another charge equally unjust, that I was the...
Page 273 - Esq., a member of this house, who hath, at the bar of this house, confessed himself to be the author and publisher of what this house has resolved to be an insolent, scandalous, and seditious libel; and who has been convicted in the Court of King's Bench of having printed and published a seditious libel, and three obscene and impious libels; and, by the judgment of the said court, has been sentenced to undergo twenty-two months' imprisonment, and is now in execution under the said judgment, be expelled...
Page 181 - He had in his hand a long list of questions, regularly numbered. He began,
Page 14 - I observed, that I was a private English gentleman, perfectly free and independent, which I held to be a character of the highest dignity ; that I obeyed with pleasure a gracious sovereign, but would never submit to the arbitrary dictates of a fellow-subject, a lord-steward of his household ; my superior indeed in rank, fortune, and abilities, but my equal only in honour, courage, and liberty.
Page 1 - Unhappy Stuart! harshly though that name Grates on my ear, I should have died with shame To see my king before his subjects stand, And at their bar hold up his royal hand; At their commands to hear the monarch plead, By their decrees to see that monarch bleed.
Page 68 - No. 45, is a false, scandalous, and seditious libel, containing expressions of the most unexampled insolence and contumely towards his majesty, the grossest aspersions against both Houses of Parliament, and the most audacious defiance of the authority of the whole legislature...
Page 19 - Bagshot to settle articles of faith, but points of honour, that indeed I had no fear of dying, but I enjoyed life as much as any man in it, that I was as little subject to be gloomy, or even peevish, as any Englishman whatever, that I valued life, and the fair enjoyments of it so much, I would never quit it by my own consent, except on a call of honour.
Page 16 - I neither would own, nor deny it; if I survived, I would afterwards declare, not before. Soon after he grew a little cooler, and in a soothing tone of voice said, I have never, I believe, offended Mr. Wilkes: why has he attacked me? he must be sorry to see me unhappy.
Page 178 - Mr. Churchill thanked me, said she then waited for him, that he only came for a moment to ask me how I did, and almost directly took his leave. He went home immediately, secured all his papers, and retired into the country. The messengers could never get intelligence where he was.

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