Page images
PDF
EPUB
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

The above shows that of the whole number of those whose occupations are given, Laborers make 42.45 per cent. Traders and Tailors each 5.03 per cent. ; Clerks 3.04 per cent. ; Printers and Shoemakers each 3.01 per cent. ; Mariners 2.05 per cent. ; Merchants, Waiters, and Stonecutters each 1.08 per cent.; and Painters, Truckmen, Carpenters, and Machinists each 1.05 per cent. The aggregate number of these 14 classes amounts to 244, making 69.12 per cent. of all the males dying from Consumption, while the remaining 50 classes, represented by 109 persons, make 30.87 per cent.

Convulsions-Contribute 109 to the bill of mortality,

1857.]

CITY REGISTRAR'S REPORT.

47

of which number, the children of foreigners furnish 87. The preceding year there were 128 deaths from this cause, the victims being in like proportion from the same classes.

Cholera Infantum. The deaths thus specified amount to 207, or nearly 4.87 per cent of all the deaths. Of this number, children of foreign parentage comprise 151, while only 53 were children of native parentage.

CroupPresents a diminished number in this report, 120 against 145 the preceding year. The children of foreigners furnish 94 or 78.33 per cent of the mortality from this cause.

Debility.--Fifty-five deaths thus designated appear in this year's table, the same number that occurred in 1855. Little reliance can be placed upon the cause of death thus specified.

Dysentery and Diarrhoea-Contribute 123 and 25 respectively to the past year's mortality, a decrease of 18 of the former, and an increase of one of the latter, compared with the number recorded in 1855.

Infantile Diseases.-Deaths from diseases incident to infancy amount to 222, or nearly 5.22 per cent of all the deaths. The previous year, this class of diseases made 6.81 per cent.

Dropsy-Seventy nine deaths are reported, four less than occurred in 1855, 36 being of native born persons, the same number of foreign born, and seven recorded as children of foreign parents.

Dropsy in Head.There is but little variation in the number that die from this cause from year to year. Like “ Disease of the Bowels,” it is a convenient term by which to designate those dying from unknown causes. The present record shows that 162, or 3.80 per cent. of the entire mortality, died from this disease in 1856, of whom those of foreign parentage number 115, or 70 per cent. of the entire mortality from this cause.

Childbirth.Of the 36 deaths from diseases incident to childbirth, 26 were foreign born females, and only 10 American. Nearly the same difference existed in the record of 1855, and exhibits a result contrary to the popular belief, that foreign born females possess more vigorous and enduring physical organizations than those born here. The premature resumption of domestic labors, and exposure, by foreign born females after childbirth, undoubtedly are the chief causes of this disparity.

Erysipelas-Furnishes a reduced number in this year's table-26 against 36 the year before. This is the same number that died of it in 1852, and is the smallest number reported in any one of the preceding seven years.

Typhoid Fever.—Seventy instances of death from this disease are noted in this year's table, 8 less than occurred in the preceding year, of which Americans contribute 42, and foreigners 28, about the same proportion recorded in last report. Of deaths from Typhus Fever, the present record shows a decrease of one half.

Diseases of the Heart.- Of the class of diseases thus denominated, embracing Pericarditis, and others not specifically ascertained, 115 are reported, an increase of 20 over the number recorded the preceding year. These diseases comprise 2.70 per cent. of all the deaths. Americans furnish 63 instances, foreigners 44, and children of foreigners 8.

Homicides.Deaths from violence are 3 less than were recorded in last report.

Hooping-Cough.But 57 deaths from this cause are recorded this year, 21 less than in 1855, only 12 of which were children of American parents.

Intemperance.—The number thus recorded is 36, an increase of 5 over the number reported the year before. For each of the last seven years, deaths from this cause have appeared as follows :—15, 12, 17, 22, 28, 45, 31, a gradual increase, the largest number being in 1854. Of the whole number recorded this year, 13 were American born.

Diseases of the Liver—Have caused 32 deaths the past year. As this much-abused organ is often made to bear more than its proper proportion of the diseases of the human subject, every report which locates the cause of death in it, is to be closely scrutinized. As it is the prime point of attack from the combined forces of syrups and pills, it may not, perhaps, be wondered at if it should be subject to about half of the diseases that afflict mankind.

Diseases of the Lungs.—Of this class of diseases 261 deaths have occurred, an increase of 35 over the number reported the previous year, and embraces Pneumonia, Congestion of Lungs, and some specified as “ Diseases of the Lungs." These diseases have been very fatal this

year, and contribute 6.13 per cent to the entire mortality: Americans furnish 100 to the number of victims, foreigners 50, and children of foreigners 111. With the exception of the months of June, July, and August, the deaths from these diseases were very evenly distributed throughout the remaining nine months.

Marasmus.—There are recorded 89 instances of death from this cause. The same suspicion attaches to this

term, so far as affects this report, as to the others before alluded to. It is gratifying to see, however, that 77 cases less of this disease are subjected to suspicion this year than were recorded the year before.

Measles. There has been a slight increase in the number of deaths from this cause the present year, 77 being the number, of which children of foreign parents furnish 61, or 79.22 per cent. of the total amount.

Old Age.—The instances thus reported in this year's table are but 57, 13 males and 44 females, 24 less than the number recorded the year before ; 37 were American born, and 20 foreign born. The average age of both the native and the foreign males was 85 years. Foreign females average 85 years, and the American females but 83.

Paralysis and Pleurisy give 39 and 53 respectively to the bill of mortality, an increase in the number of each.

Scarlatina.--Next to Consumption, this disease has been the most destructive, enrolling in its list of victims no less a number than 362, or 8.51 per cent of all the deaths. It has been prevailing since March last, in which month 10 deaths occurred, gradually increasing, with slight variations, to the end of December, in which month 115 deaths occurred. Two-thirds of the deaths from this disease took place in wards 1, 2, 3, 9, 11 and 12, while only 8 happened in ward 4. It may be interesting to tabulate the instances, as follows:

[graphic][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][ocr errors][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][ocr errors]
« PreviousContinue »