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hibition is held in July annually. The library alluded to above as belonging to the Latin School Association is one of great value, containing, as it does, one of the choicest collections of classical works in the country,the editions being the most desirable, and the books of reference the rarest and most valuable. All persons connected with the school have the free use of these books; and, for purposes of consultation, the library has proved to be of much use and value. The walls of the several rooms are adorned with photographic views of interesting ruins and works of art, and with large maps of the countries mentioned or described in the Greek and Latin works read at the school. These, besides answering the purpose of adornment, serve as important means for the conduct of the school, and assist greatly as illustrations, besides adding much to the comfort and general edification of the pupils. The same may be said of the magnificent models of ancient ruins which ornament the great hall, and also of the large collection of stereoscopic views of classical objects, which are of the most entertaining character. The Association, which constantly keeps in view the good of the school, from year to year adds to the attractions already displayed in the rooms, and to the number of choice volumes in the classical library.

The chief object of the school, as has been stated before, is to prepare young men for college and the high pursuits of life; and, therefore, boys are admitted to the school at the early age of ten years, when properly qualified, after having passed a satisfactory examination. Although a large portion of time in this school is devoted to the study of the Greek and Latin

languages, nevertheless the more elementary branches of a good English education have their special attention. The French language is taught to pupils of a proper grade by the usual instructors of the school, who are aided in giving the proper pronunciation by a native Frenchman. The regular course of instruction at the school is six years; nevertheless a pupil of good intelligence can, with proper diligence, gain promotion to a higher class, and save one or more years of schooling. Sometimes, however, it occurs, that a boy of feeble constitution requires more time for the completion of his studies, in which case he is allowed to remain in the school a year or more additional for that purpose.

The number of instructors is not fixed, but varies with the number of boys attending the school. At the accession of the present master in 1851, the number of pupils was one hundred and thirty-one, requiring four instructors only. At present, after a lapse of ten years, the number of pupils is more than twofold that of the year 1851, having increased to two hundred and sixty-three ; which gives employment to a master, sub-master, and five ushers, all of whom must have had a collegiate education. In addition to these, there is a teacher of the French language, a native of France, who pronounces the language in its greatest purity. The school is now under the charge of Mr. Francis Gardner, the well known scholar, who has held the position of master for the last ten years, and to whom is due, in no small degree, the reputation which the institution has acquired for its high standard of excellence. He is assisted by Mr. Edward H. Magill, the sub-master, who has exhibited great efficiency in his

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present position, and met with distinguished success, and also by five ushers (the full complement), who are using their best endeavors for the good of the school, and the advance of their pupils in learning.

During the year ending in July, 1861, the number of scholars registered amounted to two hundred and fortyeight, of whom seventy-one were admitted during the year. Of this last number thirty-two were received from private schools and thirty-nine from the public schools of the city. Those from the latter source are arranged in the following list according to the school from which they came, with the average ages of those from each of the schools, being all who were offered for examination:

High School, 3 boys, average age 16 years.
Adams

10
Bigelow none offered.
Boylston none offered.
Brimmer 66

101
Chapman

none offered.
Dwight

13
Eliot
3 boys,

13
Lawrence

12 Lincoln 2 boys,

12
Lyman

12
Mayhew
1 boy,

10
Phillips

114 Quincy

141 The following items of statistics were collected for the school-year terminating in July, 1861. Sixty-six boys were discharged from the school. The largest number of pupils present at any one time was two hun

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dred and thirty-four. The largest average attendance for any one month was in October, when the number amounted to two hundred and twenty-seven, the average attendance for the whole year being two hundred and fourteen. These facts bear a good comparison with those exhibited in past years, and are of a very satisfactory character.

In May last the Lawrence prizes were awarded to the successful competitors. In the Appendix of this document of which this report forms a part, will be found a correct list of these prizes, and to whom they were severally awarded. The origin of these prizes has been stated at full in a previous report, and is repeated in this for the information of those persons who may not have preserved a copy of the report in which it was given. It is as follows:

“ In 1844, the late Hon. Abbott Lawrence made a donation of a fund of $2,000, the income of which is annually payable to the chairman of the committee of the school for the time being, for distribution in prizes for the general encouragement of the scholars, in such way as the committee of the school shall consider advisable. Both of these funds are safely invested in City of Boston five per cent. stock, and yield a very acceptable sum for the purposes for which the money was given, which is expended in books selected by the successful competitors for the school honors. The public exhibition for the determining by trial to whom the prizes for the best efforts at declamation shall be awarded, and also for proclaiming the awards of the literary prizes, and those for meritorious and exemplary conduct, fidelity, and punctuality, as well as for general excellence in the various departments, is held during the month of May; and on the Saturday preceding the third Wednesday in July, the annual school exhibition takes place, in the hall belonging to the school; on which last occasion the Lawrence prizes, together with the Franklin medals, are distributed by the chairman of the committee of the school."

The proceeds of the Latin School Prize Fund was also distributed in prizes in accordance with the condition of the donation ; for, as has been stated heretofore, in the year 1819, several gentlemen of Boston, whose sons had been educated at the school, or who had received the same advantages themselves, having the welfare of the public schools at heart, and particularly of this, contributed a sum of money, now amounting to $1,050, as a fund, the income of which is for annual distribution in prizes among the most deserving scholars in the school.

Once in five weeks the parents and friends of the pupils are invited to be present at a public debate by members of the first class, and to witness the proficiency of the young gentlemen in declamation, those boys who have excelled at the private exercises of the school being selected from the several classes for the purpose. Without doubt the great interest that is felt by the pupils of the school in declamation and public debate arises from the beneficial effects of the public Saturdays. As an evidence of the proficiency in declamation attained by the pupils it is only necessary to state the fact, that while for the last ten years the school has contributed an average of about one-seventh of the pupils to each of the freshmen classes in Har

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