Who Influenced Whom?: Lessons from the Cold War

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University Press of America, 2002 - 260 pages
Urging the rejection of the realist paradigm of international relations that rested upon assumptions of balance of power concepts, the author examines eight case studies from the Cold War as a move towards setting international relations concepts with more "utility" in influencing other countries. Superpower relations with Syria, Turkey, Ethiopia, and Guinea are explored in terms of strategic relationship concepts. Taiwan and Cuba were chosen as cases in which superpowers established a relationship to a small country in order to protect it from an ideological rival. Finally, the cases of Yugoslavia and Uganda were selected as being examples where a superpower established a relationship with a country in order to gain at the expense of the other superpower. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR.
 

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The book does not state the facts as they are. I have just read the USA-Turkish relations and is totally pro-turkish. If you are not bothered to say the truth and things how they really are, why bother on writing books about it? I have said it again to others as well. One day someone that is actually coming from the area will see it. 

Contents

The Rise of the Realist Paradigm
1
Strategic Cases
13
Syria and the Superpowers
15
Turkey and the United States
39
Ethiopia and the United States
59
Guinea and the Soviet Union A Case of Defiance
83
Ideological Cases
99
Taiwan and the United States A Case of Manipulated Values
101
Uganda and the Soviet Union A Case of Idiosyncratic Action
177
Analysis
197
A Theory of Influence
199
Lessons from the Cold War
209
The Post Cold War World
217
The New World Order as Status Quo Ante
219
Conclusion
227
Postscript
233

Cuba and the Soviet Union A Case of Airing Dirty MarxistLeninist Laundry
125
Political Cases
149
Yugoslavia and the United States A Case of Mutual Influence
151

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About the author (2002)

Dale C. Tatum is Professor of Political Science at Chaffey College, California.

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