Sociology After Bosnia and Kosovo: Recovering Justice

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Rowman & Littlefield, 2000 - 183 pages
This book provides a sociological account of the events in Bosnia in the 1990s, including ethnic cleansing, mass rape, and the role of political journalists. Drawing upon a diverse group of social theorists, including Merton, Weber, and Baudrillard, Sociology After Bosnia constructs a social understanding of the experiences of people in Bosnia and the response of Western leaders to these experiences. Beyond looking at the social causes of these events, Doubt sheds light on why Bosnia and Kosovo have largely been ignored by sociologists. He shows why the personal and social tragedies of people in Bosnia and Kosovo and the world's tolerance of these tragedies challenge contemporary sociological knowledge. Doubt argues that sociologists must be willing not only to recognize this challenge, but also to respond to it in order to construct meaningfully adequate accounts of war and genocide in a postmodern era. Doing so, he contends, may yield an important and needed reconsideration of the existing body of sociologicial knowledge and a revision of how this knowledge is applied.
 

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Contents

Introduction Exploring the Prospects for Transatlantic Trade Policy Cooperation in Asia
1
II
7
III
15
IV
25
V
33
VI
49
VII
59
VIII
67
XIII
123
Piracy Protection in the Twentyfirst Century
137
XIV
147
XV
161
XVI
163
XVII
171
XVIII
173
XIX
175

X
81
XI
89
XII
107
XX
181
XXI
185
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About the author (2000)

Keith D. Doubt is associate professor of sociology at Truman State University.

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