Salonica, City of Ghosts: Christians, Muslims and Jews, 1430-1950

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HarperCollins, 2004 - 525 pages
The history of a rarely written about, bewilderingly exotic city: 500 years of clashing cultures and peoples, from the glories of Suleiman the Magnificent to its nadir under Nazi occupation. Salonica is the point where the wonders and horrors of the Orient and Europe have met over the centuries. Written with a Pepysian sense of the texture of daily life in the city through the ages, and with breathtakingly detailed historical research, Salonica will evoke the sights, smells, habits, songs and responses of a unique city and its inhabitants. The history of Salonica is one of forgotten alternatives and wrong choices, of identities assumed and discarded. For centuries Muslims, Christians, and Jews have succeeded each other in ascendancy, each people intent on erasing the presence of their predecessors, and the result is a city of cultural traditions and memories of extreme violence and genocide, one that sits on the overlapping hinterlands of both Europe and the East.

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User Review  - vguy - LibraryThing

The perfect book to read on first visit to 'thessaloniki. Unfolds the many layers of this extraordinary "border town", and how the complexity got shaved away over the course of the 20th century by ... Read full review

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User Review  - TrgLlyLibrarian - LibraryThing

I learned a lot from this book, and I admire Mazower's ability to form such a complete account of Salonica. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
Conquest 1430
15
Mosques and Hamams
31
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Mark Mazower is a professor of history at Princeton University and has recently been appointed professor of history at Birkbeck College, London. He is the author of several books, most recently Dark Continent: Europe's Twentieth Century.

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