Extracts from a Journal: Written on the Coasts of Chili, Peru, and Mexico, in the Years 1820, 1821, 1822, Volume 2

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Archibald Constable, 1824
 

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Page 171 - It comes in a fine, small, black curl upon the water, when as all the sea between it and the shore not yet reached by it is as smooth and even as glass in comparison; in half an hour's time after it has reached the shore it fans pretty briskly, and so increaseth gradually till twelve o'clock, then it is commonly strongest, and lasts so till two or three a very brisk gale...
Page 255 - Iguala, about one hundred and twenty miles from Mexico, and commenced the second Mexican Revolution, by publishing a paper, wherein he proposed to the Viceroy that a new form of government should be established, independent of the mother country. As this document, which bears the title of the Plan of Iguala...
Page 164 - Guiana, that the whole passage might have formed a part of a voyage to the South Sea Islands. Nay, the Malay cast of countenance has been detected by intelligent observers among the Indians of America. In reference to those of Acapulco in the Republic of Mexico, Captain Basil Hall thus writes : " Their features and colour partake somewhat of the Malay character; their foreheads are broad and square ; their eyes small, and not deep-seated : their cheek-bones prominent, and their heads covered with...
Page 198 - I went to the Convent of La Cruz to visit a friend who was doing penance, not for a sin he had committed, but for one he was preparing to commit. The case was this : Don N. had recently lost his wife, and not choosing to live in solitude, looked about for another helpmate ; and being of a disposition to take little trouble in such a research, or, probably, thinking that no labour could procure for him any one so suitable as...
Page 167 - It is not well situated for commerce, as the country lying between it and Mexico is difficult to cross, and is not rich either in agricultural produce, or in mines. The town, at present, consists of not more than thirty houses, with a large suburb of huts, built of reeds, wattled in open basket-work to give admission to the air. It is guarded by an extensive and formidable fortress, called the Castle of San Carlos, •standing on a height, commanding the whole harbour,. The inhabitants told us, when...
Page 229 - ... of the colonies. But they lacked the influence necessary to obtain these positions. The gravest evil resulting from this exclusion of Americans was not merely that the native inhabitants of European descent were deprived of the privilege of having a part in governing themselves, but " the moral degradation consequent upon the absence of all motive to generous exertion, and the utter hopelessness that any merit could lead to useful distinction.
Page 218 - ... never stung us, though our faces and hands were covered with them. It is said, however, that there is a bee in the country which does sting ; but the kind we saw seem to have neither the power nor the inclination, for they certainly did not hurt us ; and our friends said they were always " muy manse," very tame, and never stung any one. The honey gave out a rich aromatic perfume, and tasted differently from ours ; but possessed an agreeable flavour.
Page 171 - ... do blow in the day and rest in the night, so, on the contrary, these do blow in the night and rest in the day ; and so they do alternately succeed each other. For when the...
Page 244 - ... governors, commanders of the forces, and other elevated officers, were as generally chosen from Europe by those governments, as by the court of Madrid. It was the weak policy of the parent states to discourage the production of such commodities in the colonies as they imagined would rival their own. And if the old principle, that ' the colonies existed only for the benefit of the mother country...
Page 358 - The town was almost completely deserted when we came away ; the inhabitants having, as usual, fled to Tepic, and other inland towns, to avoid the discomfort and sickness which accompany the rains. As soon as the rains subside, in the latter end of October, or beginning of November, the people return, although that is the period described as being most unhealthy, when the ground is still moist, and the heat of the sun not materially abated.

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