Page images
PDF
EPUB

were not in the rudest state: for that it was more diffi. cult to make it than to build a house; therefore certainly those who made it were in possession of houses, and had this only as a hiding-place.--It appeared to me that the vestiges of houses, just by it, confirmed Dr. Johnson's opinion.

From an old tower, near this place, is an extensive view of Loch-Braccadil, and, at a distance, of the isles of Barra and South Uist; and on the land-side, the Cuillin, a prodigious range of mountains, capped with rocky pinnacles in a strange variety of shapes. They resemble the mountains near Corté in Corsica, of which there is a very good print. They

They make part of a great range for deer, which, though entirely devoid of trees, is in these countries called a forest.

In the afternoon, Ulinish carried us in his boat to an island possessed by him, where we saw an immense cave, much more deserving the title of antrum immane than that of the Sybil described by Virgil, which I likewise have visited. It is one hundred and eighty feet long, about thirty feet broad, and at least thirty feet high. This cave we were told had a remarkable echo; but we found none. They said it was owing to the great rains having made it damp. Such are the excuses by which the exaggeration of Highland narratives is palliated.There is a plentiful garden at Ulinish, (a great rarity in Sky,) and several trees; and near the house is a hill, which has an Erse name, signifying the hill of strife.where, Mr. M'Queen informed us, justice was of old administered. It is like the mons placiti of Scone, or those hills which are called laws, such as Kelly law, North-Berwick law, and several others. It is singular that this spot should happen now to be the sheriff's residence.

[ocr errors]

We had a very cheerful evening, and Dr. Johnson talked a good deal on the subject of literature. --Speaking of the noble family of Boyle, he said, that all the Lord Orrerys, till the present, had been writers. The first wrote several plays; the second was Bentley's antagonist; the third wrote the Life of Swift, and several other things; his son Hamilton wrote some papers in the Adventurer and World. He told us, he was well acquainted with Swift's Lord Orrery. He said, he was a feeble-minded man; that, on the publication of Dr. Delany's Remarks, on his book, he was so much alarmed that he was afraid to read them. Dr. Johnson comforted him, by telling him they were both in the right; that Delany had seen most of the good side of Swift, Lord Orrery most of the bad.—M'Leod asked, if it was not wrong in Orrery to expose the defects of a man with whom he lived in intimacy.-Johnson. Why no, sir, after the man is dead; for then it is done historically.” He added, “If Lord Orrery had been rich, he would have been a very liberal patron. His conversation was like his writings, neat and elegant, but without strength. He grasped at more than his abilities could reach; tried to pass for a better talker, a better writer, and a better thinker than he was. There was a quarrel between him and his father, in which his father was to blame ; because it arose from the son's not allowing his wife to keep company with his father's mistress. The old lord shewed his resentment in his will,-leaving his library from his son, and assigning, as his reason, that he could not make use of it."

I mentioned the affectation of Orrery, in ending all his letters on the Life of Swift in studied varieties of phrase, and never in the common mode of I am,&c. an observation which I remember to have been made several years ago by old Mr. Sheridan. This spe. cies of affectation in writing, as a foreign lady of distin. guished talents once remarked to me, is almost peculiar to the English. I took up a volume of Dryden, containing the Conquest of Granada, and several other plays, of which all the dedications had such studied conclusions. Dr. Johnson said, such conclusions were more elegant, and, in addressing persons of high rank, (as when Dryden dedicated to the Duke of York,) they were likewise more respectful. I agreed that there it was much better : it was making his escape from the Royal presence with a genteel sudden timidity, in place of having the resolution to stand still, and make a formal bow.

Lord Orrery's unkind treatment of his son in his will, led us to talk of the dispositions a man should have when dying. I said, I did not see why a man should act differently with respect to those of whom he thought ill when in health, merely because he was dying.Johnson. “I should not scruple to speak against a party, when dying: but should not do it against an individual.-It is told of Sixtus Quintus, that on his death-bed, in the intervals of his last pangs, he signed death-warrants.”—Mr. M'Queen said, he should not do so; he would have more tenderness of heart.-Johnson. “I believe I should not either ; but Mr. M‘Queen and I are cowards. It would not be from tenderness of heart; for the heart is as tender when a man is in health as when he is sick, though his resolution may be stronger. Sixtus Quintus was a sovereign as well as a priest ; and, if the criminals deserved death, he was doing his duty to the last. You would not think a judge died ill, who should be carried off by an apoplectick fit while pronouncing sentence of

GS

death. Consider a class of men whose business it is to distribute death :-soldiers, who die scattering bullets:- Nobody thinks they die ill on that account.”

Talking of Biography, he said, he did not think that the life of any literary man in England had been well written. Beside the common incidents of life, it should tell us his studies, his mode of living, the means by which he attained to excellence, and his opinion of his own works. He told us, he had sent Derrick to Dryden's relations, to gather materials for his Life; and he believed Derrick had got all that he himself should have got; but it was nothing. He added, he had a kindness for Derriek, and was sorry he was dead.

His notion as to the poems published by Mr. M Pherson as the works of Ossian, was not shaken here. Mr. M.Queen always evaded the point of authenticity, saying only that Mr. M'Pherson's pieces fell far short of those he knew in Erse, which were said to be Ossian's.--Johnson. “I hope they do. I am not disputing that you may have poetry of great merit; but that M.Pherson's is not a translation from ancient poetry. You do not believe it. I say before you, you do not believe it, though you are very willing that the world should believe it." -Mr. M'Queen made no answer to this.--Dr. Johnson proceeded “I look upon M‘Pherson's Fingal to be as gross an imposition as ever the world was troubled with. Had it been really an ancient work, a true specimen how men thought at that time, it would have been a curiosity of the first rate. As a modern production, it is nothing." --He said, he could never get the meaning of an Erse song explained to him. They told him, the chorus was generally unmeaning. “I take it, (said he,) Erse songs are like a song which I remember: it was composed in Queen Elizabeth's time, on the Earl of Essex; and the burthen was

“ Radaratoo, radarate, radara tadara tandore."

“But surely, said Mr. M‘Quecn, there were words to it, which had meaning.—Johnson. “Why, yes, sir ; I recollect a stanza, and you shall have it :

" O! then bespoke the prentices all,
6 Living in London, both proper and tall,
“ For Essex's sake they would fight all.
“ Radaratoo, radarate, radara, tadara, tandore.”*

When Mr. M'Queen began again to expatiate on the beauty of Ossian's poetry, Dr. Johnson entered into no further controversy, but, with a pleasant smile, only cried, “Ay, ay; Radaratoo radarate.

Thursday, 23d September.

I took Fingal down to the parlour in the morning, and tried a test proposed by Mr. Roderick M‘Leod, son to Ulinish. Mr. M'Queen had said he had some of the poem in the original. I desired him to mention any pasage in the printed book, of which he could re.

* This droll quotation, I have since found, was from a song in honour of the Earl of Essex, called “ Queen Elizabeth's Champion,” which is preserved in a col. lection of Old Ballads, in three volumes, published in London in different years, between 1720 and 1730. The full verse is as follows:

“O! then bespoke the prentices all,
“ Living in London,

and tall,
« In a kind letter sent straight to the Queen,
or For Essex's sake they wouid fight all.

“ Raderer too, tandaro te,
“ Raderer, tandorer, tan do re."

both proper

« PreviousContinue »