Obstacles to Peace

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Houghton Mifflin, 1917 - 486 pages
 

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Page 350 - Once to every man and nation comes the moment to decide, In the strife of truth with falsehood, for the good or evil side; Some great cause, God's New Messiah, offering each the bloom or blight, Parts the goats upon the left hand and the sheep upon the right; And the choice goes by forever 'twixt that darkness and that light.
Page 8 - And out of the ground made the LORD God to grow every, tree that is pleasant to the sight, and good for food ; the tree of life also in the midst of the garden, and the tree of knowledge of good and evil.
Page 213 - Conventions, it is especially forbidden -- a. To employ poison or poisoned weapons; b. To kill or wound treacherously individuals belonging to the hostile nation or army.
Page 440 - They look up with their pale and sunken faces, And their look is dread to see, For they 'mind you of their angels in high places, With eyes turned on Deity. "How long...
Page 447 - It completely reverses all the political relations of the United States, and will form a new epoch in our political course. . . . There is on the globe one single spot, the possessor of which is our natural and habitual enemy.
Page 447 - There is on the globe one single spot, the possessor of which is our natural and habitual enemy. It is New Orleans, through which the produce of threeeighths of our territory must pass to market, and from its fertility it will ere long yield more than half of our whole produce, and contain more than half of our inhabitants.
Page 448 - The day that France takes possession of New Orleans, fixes the sentence which is to restrain her forever within her low-water mark. It seals the union of two nations, who, in conjunction, can maintain exclusive possession of the ocean. From that moment we must marry ourselves to the British fleet and nation.
Page 486 - Hold Thou Thy Cross before my closing eyes : Shine through the gloom, and point me to the skies ; Heaven's morning breaks, and earth's vain shadows flee ; In life, in death, O Lord, abide with me.
Page 100 - I do not believe for a moment that at the end of this war, even if we stood aside and remained aside, we should be in a position, a material position, to use our force decisively to undo what had happened in the course of the war, to prevent the whole of the West of Europe opposite to us if that had been the result of the war falling under the domination of a single power, and I am quite sure that our moral position would be such as to have lost us all respect.
Page 232 - The inhabitants of a territory which has not been occupied, who, on the approach of the enemy, spontaneously take up arms to resist the Invading troops without having had time to organize themselves in accordance with Article I, shall be regarded as belligerents if they carry arms openly and if they respect the laws and customs of war.

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