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Columbia, respectively, 40 percent and 60 percent. This proportionate arrangement thereby became permanent law.

In consideration of the United States assuming 40 percent of the expense of the District, it was further provided by the said act that on and after July 1, 1922, certain miscellaneous revenues collected by the District each year, other than taxes, should be deposited in the Treasury partly to the credit of the United States and partly to the credit of the District, the part in each case being dependent upon the proportion of the appropriations each year as paid by each.

For example, in the fiscal year, 1923, the amount credited to the United States amounted to $902,077, and in the fiscal year 1924, $860,127.

However, beginning with the fiscal year 1925, Congress abandoned the 60-40 ratio of appropriations for the District and has substituted each year since in lieu thereof a lump-sum amount as the Federal Government's part of the cost of the District government. In the enacting clause of each District appropriation act, commencing with 1925, appears language under which the District receives credit for the full amount of these miscellaneous revenue collections, this being necessary to overcome the permanent law in the act of June 29, 1922, requiring these collections to be divided between the United States and the District. In other words, when Congress departed from the observance of that part of the act of June 29, 1922, providing for the payment of appropriations on a 60-40 basis, by the substitution of a lump sum each year, it also departed from that part of the said act requiring certain miscellaneous revenues to be divided between the two governments by including in each annual appropriation act of the District language under which the District received credit for the entire collections of these miscellaneous revenues.

It is proposed by title XI of the bill to repeal those portions of the act of June 29, 1922, that fix a percentage ratio of 60–40 as the basis for appropriating for the expenses of the District of Columbia, and for the division of the miscellaneous revenues between the District of Columbia and the United States, in the same ratio. The repeal of such portions of the act of June 29, 1922, will obviate the necessity of continuing the practice of carrying a saving clause in the annual appropriation acts of the District of Columbia.

The portions of the act of June 29, 1922, repealed by the bill are as follows:

[That, annually, from and after July 1, 1922, 60 per centum of such expenses of the District of Columbia as Congress may appropriate for shall be paid out of the revenues of the District of Columbia derived from taxation and privileges, and the remaining 40 per centum by the United States, excepting such items of expense as Congress may direct shall be paid on another basis;] that after June 30, 1922, where the United States is the owner of ground or the holder thereof in trust for the public, upon which improvements have been made at the joint expense of the United States and the District of Columbia, the revenues therefrom shall first be used to pay the United States 3 per centum of the full value of the ground as a ground rent, and the remainder shall be divided between them in the same proportion that each contributed to said improvements, and for such purposes the Assessor for the District of Columbia shall fix the full value of the ground after he has first made oath that he will fairly and impartially appraise the same; and that after June 30, 1922, any revenue derived from any activity or source whatever, including motor-vehicle licenses, not otherwise herein disposed of, which activity or source of revenue is appropriated for by both the United States and the District of Columbia, shall be divided between the two in the same proportion that each has contributed thereto;

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TITLE XII. Tax on BEER

Title XII imposes a tax of 50 cents a barrel on beer sold in the District of Columbia. At the present time there is no tax upon beer in the District of Columbia, although a similar tax is imposed in most every State of the Union and a substantial amount of revenue is raised thereby.

It is estimated that a tax of 50 cents a barrel on beer sold in the District of Columbia will raise additional revenue amounting to $200,000.

O

PER CAPITA PAYMENT TO RED LAKE BAND OF

CHIPPEWA INDIANS

APRIL 8, 1938.—Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state

of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. GEHRMANN, from the Committee on Indian Affairs, submitted

the following

REPORT

(To accompany H. R. 8936]

The Committee on Indian Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 8936) authorizing a per capita payment of $25 each to the members of the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians from the proceeds of the sale of timber and lumber on the Red Lake Reservation, having considered the same, report thereon with a recommendation that it do pass with the following amendments;

On page 1, line 10, strike the numerals “25” and insert in lieu thereof the numerals "15".

Amend the title so as to read: A bill authorizing a per capita payment of $15 each to the members of the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians from the proceeds of the sale of timber and lumber on the Red Lake Reservation.

In the timber fund of the Treasury of the United States, from which this payment is to be made, there is $208,633.98 as of February 1, 1938, which is money belonging to the Red Lake Band of Indians, placed there by operation of their sawmill. The payment of $15 to each member of the tribe, of which there are approximately 2,000 persons, would not exceed $30,000 and such payment would leave a capital of over $175,000, which in the opinion of your committee is more than a necessary amount to be withheld. All of the Red Lake Indian organizations concur with this opinion.

This proposed bill received the unanimous vote of your committee.

8. Repts., 76–3, vol. 219

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