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WAR DEPARTMENT CIVIL FUNCTIONS APPROPRIATION BILL, FISCAL YEAR 1939
Comparative statement of the amounts appropriated for the fiscal year 1938, the Budget estimates for the fiscal year 1939,

and the amounts recommended in the accompanying bill for 1939

REGULAR ANNUAL APPROPRIATIONS

Object

Appropriations, 1938

Budget estimates,

1939

Amount recommended

in bill for 1939

Increase (+) or
decrease (-). bill
compared with 1938

appropriation

Increase (+) or decrease (-), bill compared with 1939 Budget estimates

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3 $30,000,000 in Public Works chapter of Budget, and $2,800,000 in H. Doc. 521. The amount of $70,020,000 excludes $280,000 transferred to First Deficiency Appropriation Act, fiscal year 1938.

* Exclusive of reappropriation of $24,000,000 and $280,000 transferred to First Deficiency Appropriation Act, fiscal year 1938.
6 And $30,000,000 by allotment of Emergency Relief Appropriation, 1937.
• $50,000,000 in Public Works chapter of Budget and $32,000,000 in H. Doc. 594.
? And $7,500,000 by transfer and $15,000,000 by allotment of Emergency Relief Appropriation, 1937.
8 $26,000,000 in Public Works chapter of Budget and $5,000,000 in H. Doc. 594.

• $106,000,000 in Public Works chapter of Budget. Excludes $280,000 transferred to First Deficiency Appropriation Act, fiscal year
1938.

10 And reappropriation of $24,025,000.

1 And reappropriation of $25,000. 2 $16,500 in H. Doc. 534.

Comparative statement of the amounts appropriated for the fiscal year 1938, the Budget estimates for the fiscal year 1999, and the amounts recom

mended in the accompanying bill for 1999Continued

PERMANENT AND INDEFINITE APPROPRIATIONS

Amount recommended

Increase (+) or decrease (-), amount recommended com

pared with 1938 appropriations

Increase (+) or decrease (-), amount recommended compared with 1939 Budget estimates

Corps of Engineers:
Funds contributed for flood control,

Mississippi River.

11 $242, 000

$160, 000

$160,000

- $82, 000

Funds contributed for flood control,

Sacramento River..

12 641, 000

258, 000

258, 000

- 383, 000

Object

Appropriations, 1938

Budget estimates, 1939

for 1939

Funds contributed for river and harbor

improvements..

123, 500

100, 000

100, 000

-23, 500

[blocks in formation]

11 Revised amount for 1938, $117,432.
12 Revised amount for 1938, $858,000.
13 Exclusive of $7,500,000 by transfer and $45,000,000 by allotment of Emergency Relief Appropriation, 1937.

14 $106,000,000 in Public Works Chapter of Budget. The amount of $197,534,087 excludes $280,000 transferred to First Deficiency
Appropriation Act, fiscal year 1938.
16 And reappropriation of $24,025,000.

O

CONTROL OF SOIL EROSION, ETC., ON LANDS WITHIN

BOUNDARIES OF CACHE NATIONAL FOREST, UTAH

APRIL 18, 1938.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state

of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. DoXEY, from the Committee on Agriculture, submitted the

following

REPORT

(To accompany 8. 2221)

The Committee on Agriculture, to whom was referred the bill (S. 2221) to facilitate the control of soil erosion and flood damage originating upon lands within the exterior boundaries of the Cache National Forest in the State of Utab, having considered the same, report thereon with a recommendation that it do pass.

The action of the committee is based primarily upon recent hearings held by a special subcommittee on this bill and a companion measure, H. R. 7334, by Representative Murdock of Utah, together with the favorable reports made sometime ago by the Departments of Agriculture and of the Interior, which are printed below as follows:

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,

Washington, May 27, 1937. Hon. ELLISON D. SMITH, Chairman, Committee on Agriculture and Forestry,

United States Senate. DEAR SENATOR Smith: Receipt is acknowledged of your letter of April 22 transmitting a copy of the bill (S. 2221) to facilitate the control of soil erosion and flood damage originating upon lands within the exterior boundaries of the Cache National Forest in the State of Utah, and requesting the views of this Department thereon.

The economy of northern Utah is primarily one of agriculture, all lands suitable for tillage being rather intensively utilized for farm-crop production. The agriculture of the region is almost wholly dependent upon artificial irrigation. In relation to the need the water resources are relatively limited, making their careful conservation and use a matter of vital necessity to the dependent communities, the counties, and the State.

The Cache National Forest as initially established more than a quarter-century ago by reservation of part of the public domain, embraced parts of the important watersheds, but by no means the most vital parts. Due to long continued and extensive use of the timber and forage resources and lack of organized effort to prevent forest fires much of the land outside of the national forest had been depleted of its original forest and vegetative cover. The water-conservation potentiality of the soil, therefore, had been greatly reduced and the less stable soils were subject to serious erosion, frequently occurring in the form of mudflows or landslides which caused serious damage to life, property, and public utilities.

The various ager cies of the city of Ogden, Utah, and of the large number of lesser towns and villages to the north thereof, repeatedly have petitioned that their watersheds be included within the Cache National Forest. These petitions have been subscribed to not only by the officials of the various local agencies of Government but also by the officers of the representative private groups most directly concerned. The primary value of the land is for grazing and timber production and as a source of water supply but under proper management it would also be of high social value for recreational use, the protection of wildlife resources, etc. In large part the land is overgrazed and subject to destructive timber cutting and serious soil erosion. Its actual value has not been specifically determined but it is estimated to range from 50 cents to $5 per acre with an average of perhaps $2.50 to $3 per acre. In the light of the experience already gained in the management of related lands now within the Cache National Forest there is every probability that management of this land largely would safeguard and enhance its high social and economic values.

Studies conducted in 1930 by a commission appointed by the then Governor of the State, George H. Dern, demonstrated rather convincingly that the serious floods and mudflows almost invariably originated upon depleted lands, seldom, if ever, upon lands supporting adequate forest or vegetative covers. That fact gave strong impetus to local efforts to effectuate the proper protection of watersheds.

The most recent move to that end has been the addition to the Cache National Forest by Executive order of May 22, 1936, of sections or parts of sections containing unappropriated public lands. However, the lands thus added constitute widely isolated islands of Federal management mingled with larger acreages in private ownership and upon which there has been no constructive control. In view of that fact, the inclusion of the lands within the national forest will not accomplish the desired purposes unless some means is established by which the intermingled private lands progressively can be brought under permanent public management.

The bill S. 2221 proposes to make available for the acquisition of such lands all that part of the entire receipts of the Cache National Forest which is proportionate with that part of the forest which is situated in the State of Utah. Normally 25 percent of said receipts would be paid each year to the State for distribution to the counties, 10 percent would be made available for expenditure by the Secretary of Agriculture in the construction or maintenance of roads or trails, and 65 percent would be retained in the Treasury. In effect then, the use of the entire receipts would mean that the counties would contribute 25 percent to the cost of acquisition and would waive beneficial expenditures amounting to 10 percent additionally. Progress in acquisition would be governed wholly by the degree to which revenues were produced by the National Forest lands. For the fiscal year 1936, the total receipts from the Cache National Forest were $18,926.40. Approximately 50 percent of the gross area is in the State of Utah. The total amount which would be available for land acquisition if the bill S. 2221 were enacted into law therefore would be approximately $9,500 per year. Within the Utah part of the Cache Forest the lands in other than Federal ownership aggregate 215,787 acres, of which the major part eventually should be acquired by the Federal Government.

In the opinion of this Department the adequate protection of the watersheds involved is a matter of vital economic and social interest. The means of bringing it about as proposed by the pending bill seems equitable and effective. The. Department of Agriculture therefore recommends the favorable consideration of the bill by your committee.

Upon reference of the Bureau of the Budget as required by Budget Circular 336 under date of May 21, 1937, the Acting Director thereof advised the Department of Agriculture that “there would be no objection to the submission of the proposed report to the committee." Sincerely,

H. A. WALLACE, Secretary.

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