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AMENDING DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA ALCOHOLIC

BEVERAGE CONTROL ACT

APRIL 18, 1938.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state

of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. McGEHEE, from the Committee on the District of Columbia,

submitted the following

REPORT

(To accompany H. R. 9417]

The Committee on the District of Columbia, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 9417) to amend the District of Columbia Alcoholic Beverage Control Act, having considered the same, report it back to the House with the recommendation that it do pass.

When the original District of Columbia Alcoholic Beverage Control Act was enacted on January 24, 1934, the railroads attempted to have included therein a provision to permit them to secure general licenses covering their dining and club cars at an annual fee. This was necessary because the railroads would not want to assume responsibility of selling liquors in cars which are changed daily in their runs, unless they obtained a license for every car where such liquor might be sold in the District of Columbia. The Pennsylvania Railroad alone operates 190 dining cars, exclusive of club and lounge cars, any one of which might be operated in the District of Columbia for 1 day or one run, and in order to secure a license for each car, it would be necessary for the Pennsylvania Railroad to pay an annual license fee of $3,800 for dining cars alone. In the rush of enactment of this law, the desired provision was not included, and as a result that railroad, which merely desires to meet the wishes of its patrons in the matter, has never sold liquor in the District of Columbia because the fees are prohibitive.

This situation has resulted in inconvenience to the traveling public, some of whom arrive at the train some time ahead of departure and proceed to the dining car for a cocktail which cannot be furnished until the train has passed out of the District limits.

This bill merely adds to the existing District of Columbia Alcoholic Beverage Control Act the right of a railway company to secure a blanket license for all of its cars upon the payment of an annual fee

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of $60. It does not change the act further, except as to fees for individual cars, which are reduced from $20 to $10.

The amount of $60 per company and $10 per car was determined upon at a round-table conference among representatives of the various railroad and steamboat companies involved and the corporation counsel, and will result in an increase in the revenues derived by the District of Columbia from such license fees.

The States of Maryland and New Jersey charge an annual fee of $150, and the State of Delaware, $100 per railroad. In all these States the mileage involved is many times that which exists within the District of Columbia limits. No railroad has a run in the District of over 7 miles.

The bill reported has the approval of all the railroads operating passenger service in the District of Columbia, the Norfolk and Washington Steamboat Co., and the Pullman Co. It has been orally approved by the Corporation Counsel of the District of Columbia after consultation with members of the Alcoholic Beverage Control Board.

In accordance with paragraph 2a of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, changes in existing law are shown as follows:

The second paragraph of subsection (g), section 11, of the Alcoholic Beverage Control Act is amended by striking out the words "$20 per annum" and inserting "$10 per annum" in lieu thereof, then adding the following:

Provided, That such a license may be issued to any company engaged in interstate commerce covering all dining, club, and lounge cars operated by such company on railroads within the District of Columbia upon the payment of an annual fee of $60.

Subsection (b) of section 11 of the act is amended by adding the following: : Provided, That such a license may be issued to any company engaged in interstate commerce covering all dining, club, and lounge cars operated by such company on railroads within the District of Columbia upon the payment of an annual fee of $30.

Subsection (d) of section 14 of the act is amended by adding at the end of the first sentence the following: except that a company engaged in interstate commerce may file one application for a license for the operation thereunder of all of its dining, club, and lounge cars operated on railroads within the District of Columbia.

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PROVIDING FOR CIVILIAN NAVAL TRAINING, AND FOR

OTHER PURPOSES

APRIL 18, 1938.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state

of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. KNIFFIN, from the Committee on Naval Affairs, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 9965]

The Committee on Naval Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 9965) to provide for civilian naval training, and for other purposes, having considered the same, report it to the House with an amendment and the recommendation that the bill do pass.

Amend as follows:

Page 3, line 9, after the words "Marine Corps”, insert the words "and Navy and Marine Corps Reserve”.

The purpose of this bill is to authorize the Secretary of the Navy to provide naval training both ashore and afloat for such civilians as may be selected for such training upon their own application.

This legislation parallels for the Navy the civilian military training camps conducted by the Army. These latter are specifically covered by the act of June 3, 1916, as amended, and the act of March 4, 1923, as amended (U. S. C., title 10, secs. 442, 454, and 455). Under the provisions of these statutes, the Army enrolls each year a specified number of young men, depending upon the amount of appropriation made therefor, for 30 days' military training and sends them to various Army posts and training camps for this purpose. They do not become members of the Army, the Army Reserve, or National Guard, nor do they assume any obligations for Federal service beyond the 30-day training period for which enrolled. They receive no pay while performing this training duty, but are furnished transportation to and from the camps, subsistence, clothing (uniform), bedding, and shelter. The law also permits the expenditure of funds for the necessary preparation of camp sites. The annual supply bill for the War Department contains an appropriation for this specific purpose.

courses:

There is no such law covering similar training of civilians by the Navy. Under the provisions of the basic Naval Reserve Act of February 28, 1925 (Ù. S. C., title 34, ch. 15), members of the Naval Reserve may be given training duty either with or without pav or allowances. In order to give training similar to that of the civilian military training camps, it would be necessary to enlist these young men in the Naval Reserve. Such enlistments would have to be for a period of 4 years and would carry with it obligation to respond to call for active service in the event of war or a national emergency.

It is important to the naval defense that there be a source of supply from which additional men may be procured, at least partially trained and available for immediate duty in the event of a national emergency. The most economical and satisfactory way of accomplishing this would be a system of training paralleling the civilian military training camps of the Army, except that each period of training should be 45 days instead of 30 days. If this legislation is enacted it is planned to provide the following

(a) The basic course for enlisted personnel for physically fit male citizens of the United States, 16 to 20 years of age, previous military training not required. Applicants must possess average general intelligence, be able to read and write English, have completed the equivalent of a high-school education, and be of good moral character. This course provides preliminary naval training including physical development, boat drills, athletics, squad and company drill, marksmanship, first aid, sanitation, personal hygiene, courtesy, discipline, and studies in citizenship. Those taking this course will be allowed to qualify for the next higher or advanced course.

(6) The advanced course for enlisted personnel will be conducted for those men who have successfully completed the basic training course at naval training stations. The purpose of this course is for the applicant to obtain a knowledge of such subjects as navigation, signals, radio, clerical work, shipboard routine, steam and electrical engineering and ship drills. Candidates will be allowed to specialize in branches desired if found qualified.

(c) The basic course for officers for physically fit male citizens of the United States, 18 to 23 years of age, and who have completed a sophomore year in college, university, or technical school. This will consist of 45 days of intensive training and instruction as embryo officers. It will include seamanship, ordnance, navigation, and engineering, small arms and infantry.

(d) Advanced course for officers between the ages of 19 and 25 years, who have qualified in the basic course. This second period on ships afloat will be a continuation of their training on shore, and will include officer's training on shipboard. Officers who complete the advanced course will be encouraged to take correspondence courses in professional subjects with a view to qualifying for commissions in the Naval Reserve.

Under the provisions of this bill the Government would furnish uniforms, subsistence, and transportation via the most usual and direct route. The Government will pay all necessary expenses---transportation to and from point of training, shelter, food, uniforms, and medical attention. The Government will not pay men in training:

In the event this bill should be enacted, it is planned to enroll 2,500 of these young men (500 to be college sophomores) during the

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