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CONGRESS

SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS, CIVILIAN CONSERVA

TION CORPS, FISCAL YEAR 1939

APRIL 4, 1938.—Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state

of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. WOODRUM, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted

the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. J. Res. 627]

The Committee on Appropriations, to whom was referred the joint resolution (H. J. Res. 627) entitled “Joint resolution providing an additional appropriation for the Civilian Conservation Corps for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1939," report the measure with two amendments. On page 1, line 7, strike out the year “1938" and insert in lieu thereof “1937”, and on pages 1 and 2, lines 11 and 1, respectively, strike out "not to exceed $28,000,000 of".

The joint resolution as proposed to be amended will make available to the Civilian Conservation Corps for the fiscal year 1939 an estimated unexpended balance of approximately $29,500,000 and in addition thereto a new direct appropriation of $22,000,000, a total of additional available funds for the next fiscal year of $51,500,000.

The independent offices appropriation bill for the fiscal year 1939 carries a total appropriation for this purpose of $226,331,000. This amount would provide employment for approximately 60,000 less enrollees and 7,000 less employees and would require the reduction in the number of camps to be maintained from 1,500 to 1,200 on May 31 next. The addition of this $51,500,000 will raise the total amount to be available for the fiscal year 1939 from $226,331,000 to $277,831,000. This latter sum will provide for the full complement of the 1,500 camps and render unnecessary the closing of any of the 300 camps on May 31, except on War and Navy reservations, which have not completed their work program, and will permit the furnishing of employment to the 60,000 enrollees and the 7,000 other employees who otherwise would not be continued.

With the additional sum provided by the joint resolution, the approximately $278,000,000 to be available for the Civilian Conservation Corps for the fiscal year 1939 will compare with $322,000,000 expended for that purpose for the present fiscal year (1938), $388,000,000 for the fiscal year 1937, and $488,000,000 for the fiscal year 1936.

Since the submission of the original estimate of $226,331,000 and the inclusion of that sum in the independent offices appropriation bill now pending, there has been a considerable change in the employment situation in the United States and an increase in the funds for the Civilian Conservation Corps is one of the best forms of work relief that the Government can provide. Members of the House, generally, are too familiar with the character of work performed by the corps and the value of the relief afforded to enrollees and their families to require reiteration of the facts.

If the 300 camps are not to be discontinued on May 31, the administrators of the Civilian Conservation Corps must have sufficient advance notice to enable them to rearrange their plans. Therefore, early and prompt action on the joint resolution is desirable from an administrative standpoint.

The maximum number of enrollees, exclusive of those in the Territories and in Indian camps, possible under the appropriation in the independent offices bill ($226,331,000) is 239,000. With the addition of the $51,500,000 made possible by the joint resolution, the maximum comparable number is 300,000.

The committee has been advised by the Director of the Civilian Conservation Corps that if the additional appropriation is made available as proposed by the joint resolution none of the 300 camps with an unfinished project on May 31 next, except on the War and Navy reservations, will be closed and 1,500 camps with a peak strength of approximately 300,000 enrollees will be maintained during the fiscal year 1939.

The committee recommend prompt and favorable consideration of the joint resolution.

O

CONGRESS

PROVIDING FOR THE ADDITION OF CERTAIN LANDS TO THE VICKSBURG NATIONAL MILITARY PARK, MISS.

APRIL 4, 1938.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state

of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. DEROUEN, from the Committee on the Public Lands, submitted

the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 8628]

The Committee on the Public Lands, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 8628) to provide for the addition of certain lands to the Vicksburg National Military Park, in the State of Mississippi, and for other purposes, report favorably thereon with the recommendation that the bill pass the House with the following amendments:

Page 1, line 6, beginning with the word "when" strike out up to and inclusive of the word “1888” and insert in lieu thereof the following “with donated funds”.

Page 2, strike out all of section 3.

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STATEMENT OF FACT

The purpose of the bill (H. R. 8628) is to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to acquire in behalf of the United States, by donation or purchase with donated funds, approximately 8 acres of land adjoining the Clay Street entrance to the Vicksburg National Military Park.

The situation that exists at this particular spot at the entrance to the park, is about as follows:

Clay Street, which runs east and west through the city of Vicksburg, and which is a part of U. S. Highway 80, ends within the intersection of the city limits, whereas U. S. Highway 80 continues on through the park. At this intersection, there has been erected an archway. This was done many years ago and prior to the congested traffic that is on our highways today; therefore, there was not the demand for the width and space as is required today, by reason of the enormous number of cars that go over this east and west U. S. Highway 80 at the present time. The space between the pillars of this archway is barely sufficient for the passage of two cars, in fact, were they to pass each other under it, there would not be more than 12 or 15 inches between them.

On account of this limited space in the archway, it is a great hazard on account of the number of cars traveling U. S. Highway 80, and the thousands of visitors that view this park yearly. Hence it is necessary for the Department of the Interior to acquire this small acreage, and rebuild this gateway into the park, so as to eliminate this serious traffic hazard.

A part of this acreage contains commercial property, and the other part of it is used (the topography of this section being very hilly) for the disposal of garbage and trash, which makes a very unsightly scene at the entrance of this beautiful national park.

The acquisition of these lands will eliminate the narrow roadway and archway, will eliminate the despoiling of the park's beauty by having a garbage dump in such close proximity, and permit the Department of the Interior to build an adequate and proper roadway at this entrance, bringing this roadway and entrance in conformance with the other streets and roads through the park.

The report of the Secretary of the Interior is hereinbelow set forth and made a part of this report:

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, March 2, 1998. Hon. RENÉ L. DEROUEN, Chairman, Committee on the Public Lands,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. MY DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: I have received a letter from your committee, dated February 2, enclosing a copy of H. R. 8628, entitled “A bill to provide for the addition of certain lands to the Vicksburg National Military Park, in the State of Mississippi, and for other purposes," and requesting a report thereon.

This proposed legislation would authorize the acquisition for and the addition to Vicksburg National Military Park of approximately 8 acres of land at the Clay Street entrance to the park. At present, the roadway through the arch at the Clay Street entrance to the park is very narrow and presents a serious traffic hazard. The land proposed for acquisition has been used for the disposal of garbage and trash, causing an unsightly appearance to the entrance and a menace to the health of visitors to the park. The acquisition of the above-mentioned land will enable this Department to eliminate the narrow roadway through the arch at the Clay Street entrance and will allow the construction of roadways on either side of the arch. If enacted into law, the proposed legislation would permit the widening of the approach road to the park, thereby bringing the entrance in conformity with the road system being constructed within the park. In addition to the practical value of this proposed addition to Vicksburg, the acquisition of these lands will enable the development of a more appropriate entrance to the park.

In view of the facts presented, it is recommended that H. R. 8628 be given favorable consideration by the Congress.

I have been advised by the Bureau of the Budget that the proposed legislation would not be in conflict with the program of the President if modified to provide for the acquisition of the land either by donation or by purchase with donated funds and the elimination of the authorization of an appropriation of Federal funds for the acquisition of the land and expenses in connection therewith. Sincerely yours,

Harold L. ICKES,

Secretary of the Interior. O

GRAVE MARKERS FOR DECEASED VETERANS

APRIL 5, 1938.—Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state

of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. FADDIS, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 1898)

The Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (S. 1898) to authorize the Secretary of War to furnish certain markers for certain graves, having considered the same, report favorably thereon with a recommendation that it do pass.

Under existing law, the Secretary of War is authorized to furnish only a stone marker for the grave of any deceased person for which he is authorized to provide a marker. In a number of the new memorial cemeteries, flat bronze markers are the only type of grave markers that are permitted to be used. In view of this situation, the families of many deceased veterans are prevented from obtaining a marker at Government expense, a right existing law gives them, unless they select a cemetery not requiring the use of bronze markers.

The bill S. 1898 provides that, notwithstanding any provision of existing law, the Secretary of War is authorized and directed to furnish, at the option of the relative or representative of the deceased war veteran, either a flat stone grave marker, a standard flat bronze grave marker, or an upright stone grave marker or headstone, for the grave of any deceased person for which the Secretary of War is authorized to furnish a marker or headstone. However, specific provision is made in this measure that the Secretary of War shall furnish the upright stone marker, authorized by section 4877 of the Revised Statutes, for cemeteries under the jurisdiction of the Secretary of War.

A hearing was held on this bill June 30, 1937, wbich was conducted by a subcommittee of the Senate Military Affairs Committee. The measure is sponsored by the American Legion and is endorsed by the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States. The subcommittee also had before it representatives of the War Department, as well as privato individuals who wished to be heard.

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