Page images
PDF
EPUB

Longwood-avenue Bridge (over Muddy river and Boston & Albany R.R.).

The original wooden structure was built in 1857, and rebuilt in 1877. The present masonry arches were erected in 1899 by the Park Departments of Boston and Brookline, and are maintained jointly by them.

Malden Bridge (from Charlestown to Everett).

This is a wooden pile bridge with a retractile steel draw, and was rebuilt in 1900–01. Only ordinary repairs have been made; the northerly side of the draw should be repainted. The bridge is in good condition.

Massachusetts-avenue Bridge (over Boston & Albany R.R.).

This is an iron bridge, built in 1876. It was thoroughly repaired in 1893, with the exception of the wooden fences. These fences are now in very poor condition, and should be rebuilt, and the sidewalks should be resurfaced.

Massachusetts-avenue Bridge (over Providence Division, New

York, New Haven & Hartford R.R.).

This is an iron bridge, built in 1876. The woodwork was renewed in 1901, and the ironwork cleaned and painted. The bridge is now in good condition.

Mattapan Bridge (from Dorchester to Milton).

The Metropolitan Park Commission acquired the site of the old bridge in February, 1901, the city having previously maintained the part within its limits. The old iron bridge was removed during the past year, and it has been replaced by a three-arch bridge, built of concrete and steel beams, with granite facing. The arches are semi-circular, two spans being 14 feet and one 50 feet; the bridge has one 56-ft. roadway and two 12-ft. sidewalks; it was built by the commission, and is completed with the exception of surfacing the roadway.

Meridian-street Bridge (from East Boston to Chelsea).

This is a wooden pile bridge, with a wooden turn-table draw on a pile foundation. The original structure was built in 1858. It was rebuilt soon afterwards, and was widened and rebuilt in 1884, excepting the draw, which was built in 1875–76. The chords of the draw were rebuilt in 1896; few repairs have been made ; The waterways are in poor condition; some of the piles should be replaced; the ribbons, caps, planking and irons need renewal in places; the wharf should be ledecked; the fascias on the sidewalks are getting poor; the stringers and bulkhead at the Boston end of the channel need strengthening; the draw should be furnished with some new rack; the track is getting much worn ; one pile under the sidewalk should be spliced ; one of the main truss-rods is broken, and a new one should be furnished; the pier is in poor condition.

Milton Bridge (from Dorchester to Milton).

The city maintains the part within its limits. The original structure is very old. It was widened in 1871–72. The older part of this bridge was built of stone, and the widening is an iron structure on stone columns. The westerly sidewalk was rebuilt on new iron girders and floor beams in 1900. The fences have been painted, and some repairs made on one sidewalk. The bridge should be painted, and the sidewalk planking on the down-stream side of the bridge should be renewed in part; one of the cap-stones over the first waterway is cracked.

Mt. Washington-avenue Bridge (over Fort Point Channel).

This is a wooden pile bridge, with an iron draw. It was built in 1854, and rebuilt in 1870–71. This bridge is in poor condition. It has the only draw of importance in the city that is moved by hand-power; the draw-pier is in poor condition, and is so low that it is covered with water at every high course of tides; the sidewalks, draw landings, roadway planking on draw, bracing on bents, roadway pavement, and the fender-guards are in very poor condition; the waterways are out of repair; the foundation of the house is in poor condition.

The Secretary of War has ordered the draw way to be widened from 43 feet 7 inches to 50 feet by December 31, 1903. If this bridge is to be kept open it should be rebuilt.

Neponset Bridge (from Dorchester to Quincy).

The city maintains the part within its limits. The original structure was built in 1802, and the present one in 1877. The draw is too heavy to be handled by hand, and should be replaced by a turn-table draw. General repairs have been made, including planking and capsills on the up-stream pier. The up-stream draw-arm is bent and should be repaired; the piers and fender-guards need extensive repairs; the blocking, planking, stringers near the gudget,ns and gears, and the bearing-plate at the abutment are in poor condition, and should be renewed. *

Neptune-road Bridge (over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn R.R.).

This is an iron bridge, built in 1887–88, and is maintained by the Park Department. The roadway planking should be renewed; otherwise the bridge is in good condition.

Newton-street Bridge (over Providence Division, New York, New Haven & Hartford R.R.).

This is an iron bridge, built in 1872. During the past year new stringers were put in where needed and an entire new deck put on. The ironwork was also thoroughly cleaned and painted. The bridge is now in good condition for a structure of its age.

Norfolk-street Bridge (over Midland Division, New York, New Haven & Hartford R.R.).

This is a new through lattice girder bridge built by the railroad company under the decree of the Superior Court abolishing the grade crossings at Blue Hill avenue and Oakland street, and was opened to public travel in 1902.

It consists of two riveted lattice girders of 130 feet span and 22 feet high between centres of chords. The roadway is 34 feet wide in the clear, and there are two sidewalks each about 6 feet wide. The floor beams are built steel beams, ranging from 20 inches to 30 inches in depth, and the roadway stringers are 6-inch by 14-inch hard pine resting on angle seats. The roadway planking is in two courses, the lower being 3-inch hard pine and the upper 2-inch spruce. The sidewalk stringers are 4-inch by 12-inch hard pine and the planking 2-inch hard pine.

The surface of the bridge is maintained by the city, and the rest of the structure by the railroad company. The bridge is in good condition, but the approaches, especially that at the north end of the bridge, have not been put in satisfactory condition for public travel.

North Beacon-street Bridge (from Brighton to Watertown).

The city maintains the part within its limits. This is a wooden pile bridge with a wooden leaf draw. The original structure was built in 1822, and the present one in 1884. A new deck of 4-inch spruce was laid on the bridge, and new stringers were added where needed between the abutment and the draw arms, and a few piles that had begun to decay were strengthened. The bridge is in poor condition; the sidewalk planking, the draw planking, three draw arms, and some of the adjoining stringers should be renewed; the draw pier is in very poor condition, and the upper part should be rebuilt, and many of the piles in the bridge have begun to decay.

North Harvard-street Bridge (from Brighton to Cambridge).

The city maintains the part within its limits. This bridge was originally built in 1662, and was rebuilt, except the piling, in 1879; the draw was built in 1891. The bridge is in the care of the Commissioners for the Boston and Cambridge bridges; the city pays one-half the cost of maintenance. New rails were put on the draw fence, and the bridge has been painted. The bridge is in poor condition, and should be rebuilt and replaced with a wider structure, more in keeping with the improvements recently made in the vicinity.

Oakland-street Bridge (over Midland Division, New York, New Haven & Hartford R.R.).

This is a new steel plate girder bridge built under the decree of the Superior Court abolishing the grade crossing at this point. It was built by the railroad company, and was opened for travel in the fall of 1902. The surface of the bridge is maintained by the city and the rest of the structure by the railroad company. It is in good condition.

Perkins-street Foot-bridge (over the B. & M. R. R. and B. & A. R.R. in Charlestown).

This bridge was built in 1900, and opened to travel February 2, 1901; it has two spans of wooden stringers and one of steel Pratt trusses. The surface is maintained by the city, the rest of the structure by the railroad companies. It should be painted.

Prison-Point Bridge (from Charlestown to Cambridge).

This bridge was originally built in 1833, and the present structure was built in 1876–77. It is a wooden pile bridge, with an iron leaf draw. The bridge is in the care of the Commissioners for the Boston and Cambridge bridges; the city pays one-half the cost of maintenance. The bridge is in poor condition, and repairs have been made only when absolutely needed, as the bridge will soon be replaced by a new structure; the Boston & Maine R.R. have begun to build a temporary bridge around this one, to be used while the new bridge is being built.

Public Garden Foot-bridge.

This is an iron bridge. It was built in 1867, and was thoroughly repaired in 1887. It is now in good condition.

Scarboro’ Pond Foot-bridge (in Franklin Park).

This is an elliptical masonry arch of 40 feet span and 8 feet 3 inches rise. It was built in 1893, and is maintained by the Park Department.

Shawmut-avenue Bridge (over Boston & Albany R. R. and Providence Division, N. Y., W. H. & H. R.R.).

This is an iron bridge, built in 1871. A thorough examination of this bridge was made in March, 1902, which showed that the ironwork over the main tracks of the Boston & Albany Railroad was so badly eaten away that it was not deemed safe for the traffic coming on it. A special report was made to the Superintendent of Streets under date of March 22, 1902, calling attention to the condition of this bridge and recommending that certain repairs be made at once. In accordance with this recommendation the flooring over the main tracks of the B. & A. R.R. was removed and the angle iron seats for the stringers were reinforced by timber blocking resting on the bottom flanges of the girders. New stringers were put in where needed and the lower planking renewed.

These repairs can be considered as only putting the bridge temporarily in a safe condition, and the recommendation made at that time is here renewed, “that the bridge should be rebuilt within the next two years.” At the time these repairs were made the cast-iron parapet was removed from the girder on the westerly street line. This girder was found to be so badly rusted that it was deemed prudent to

« PreviousContinue »