The Works of Alexander Pope, Esq, Volume 9

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J. and P. Knapton, 1751 - 372 pages
 

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Page 83 - As to the return of his health and vigour, were you here, you might inquire of his haymakers ; but as to his temperance, I can answer that (for one whole day) we have had nothing for dinner but mutton broth, beans and bacon, and a barn-door fowl.
Page 94 - I remember, when I was a little boy, I felt a great fish at the end of my line, which I drew up almost on the ground, but it dropt in, and the disappointment vexes me to this very day ; and I believe it was the type of all my future disappointments.
Page 125 - I wish you had a little villakin in his neighbourhood ; but you are yet too volatile, and any lady with a coach and six horses would carry you to Japan.
Page 64 - IT is a perfect trouble to me to write to you, and your kind letter left for me at Mr. Gay's affected me so much, that it made me like a girl. I cannot tell what to say to you ; I only feel that I wish you well in every circumstance of life...
Page 191 - Imagination has no limits, and that is a sphere in which you may move on to eternity; but where one is confined to truth, or, to speak more like a human creature, to the appearances of truth, we soon find the shortness of our tether. Indeed by...
Page 34 - I have often endeavoured to establish a friendship among all men of genius, and would fain have it done : they are seldom above three or four contemporaries, and if they could be united, would drive the world before them.
Page 161 - It is not now indeed a time to think of myself, when one of the nearest and longest ties I have ever had, is broken all on a sudden by the unexpected death of poor Mr. Gay. An inflammatory fever hurried him out of this life in three days.
Page 94 - I have read my friend Congreve's verses to Lord Cobham, which end with a vile and false moral, and I remember is not in Horace to Tibullus, which he imitates, " that all times are " equally virtuous and vicious," wherein he differs from all poets, philosophers, and Christians that ever writ.
Page 95 - I will further tell you, that all my endeavours, from a boy, to distinguish myself, were only for want of a great title and fortune, that I might be used like a Lord by those who have an opinion of my parts whether right or wrong, it is no great matter, and so the reputation of wit or great learning does the office of a blue ribbon, or of a coach and six horses.
Page 213 - My servants are sensible and tender of me; they have intermarried, and are become rather low friends than servants, and to all those that I see here with pleasure, they take a pleasure in being useful.

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