The Dublin University Magazine: A Literary and Political Journal, Volume 34

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W. Curry, jun., and Company, 1849
 

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Page 506 - ... sore all over his feet, that he could scarce stir. Yet he was forced to run away from a miller and other company, that took them for rogues. His sitting at table at one place, where the master of the house, that had not seen him in eight years, did know him, but kept it private ; when at the same table there was one that had been of his own regiment at Worcester, could not know him, but made him drink the King's health, and said that the King was at least four fingers higher than he.
Page 3 - ... that deep sense of voicefulness, of stern watching, of mysterious sympathy, nay, even of approval or condemnation, which we feel in walls that have long been washed by the passing waves of humanity. It is in their lasting witness against men, in their quiet contrast with the transitional character of all things, in the strength which, through the lapse of seasons and times, and the decline and birth of dynasties, and the changing of the face of the earth, and of the limits of the sea, maintains...
Page 506 - Which done, we weighed anchor, and with a fresh gale and most happy weather we set sail for England. All the afternoon the King walked here and there, up and down (quite contrary to what I thought him to have been), very active and stirring. Upon the quarterdeck he fell into discourse of his escape from Worcester, where it made me ready to weep to hear the stories that he told of his difficulties that he had passed through...
Page 510 - Burnet, who undertook to secure me against any infection, having survived the month of his own house being shut up, died himself of the plague : till the nights, though much lengthened, are grown too short to conceal the burials of those that died the day before...
Page 508 - ... spotted fever ; that she was as full of the spots as a leopard : which is very strange that it should be no more known ; but perhaps it is not so. And that the king do seem to take it much to heart, for that he hath wept before her ; but, for all that, that he hath not missed one night since she was sick, of supping with my Lady Castlemaine ; which I believe is true, for she says that her husband hath dressed the suppers every night ; and I confess I saw him myself coming through the street dressing...
Page 2 - For, indeed, the greatest glory of a building is not in its stones, nor in its gold. Its glory is in its Age, and in that deep sense of voicefulness, of stern watching, of mysterious sympathy, nay, even of approval or condemnation, which we feel in walls that have long been washed by the passing waves of humanity.
Page 511 - ... prayers, soberly to bed ; only I got into the bridegroom's chamber while he undressed himself, and there was very merry, till he was called to the bride's chamber, and into bed they went. I kissed the bride in bed, and so the curtaines drawne with the greatest gravity that could be, and so good night.
Page 511 - Thus, I ended this month with the greatest joy that ever I did any in my life, because I have spent the greatest part of it with abundance of joy, and honour, and pleasant journeys, and brave entertainments, and without cost of money; and at last live to see the business ended with great content on all sides.
Page 246 - mid their ashes expire; He sees, too, Oh, saddest! Oh, mournfullest sight! The crucifix gleam in the thick of the fight. More terrible far than the merciless steel Is the up-lifted cross in the red hand of Zeal ! Again the dream changes.
Page 381 - A quibble, poor and barren as it is, gave him such delight that he was content to purchase it by the sacrifice of reason, propriety, and truth. A quibble was to him the fatal Cleopatra for which he lost the world and was content to lose it.

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