The Lady's Token, Or Gift of Friendship

Front Cover
Cotesworth Pinckney
J. Buffum, 1848 - 128 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 81 - And with them the Being Beauteous Who unto my youth was given, More than all things else to love me, And is now a saint in heaven. With a slow and noiseless footstep Comes that messenger divine, Takes the vacant chair beside me, Lays her gentle hand in mine. And she sits and gazes at me With those deep and tender eyes, Like the stars, so still and saint-like, Looking downward from the skies.
Page 107 - They say there is a young lady in [New Haven] who is beloved of that Great Being, who made and rules the world, and that there are certain seasons in which this Great Being, in some way or other invisible, comes to her and fills her mind with exceeding sweet delight...
Page 12 - Thus star by star declines, Till all are passed away, As morning high and higher shines, To pure and perfect day ; Nor sink those stars in empty night, But hide themselves in heaven's own light.
Page 108 - He is, to be raised up out of the world and caught up into heaven, being assured that He loves her too well to let her remain at a distance from Him always. There she is to dwell with Him, and to be ravished with His love and delight forever. Therefore, if you present all the world before her, with the richest of its treasures, she disregards it and cares not for it, and is unmindful of any pain or affliction.
Page 108 - She has a strange sweetness in her mind and singular purity in her affections, is most just and conscientious in all her conduct; and you could not persuade her to do anything wrong or sinful if you would give her all the world, lest she should offend this Great Being. She is of a wonderful sweetness, calmness and universal benevolence of mind, especially after this Great God has manifested Himself to her mind.
Page 107 - Being, in some way or other invisible, comes to her and fills her mind with exceeding sweet delight and that she hardly cares for anything except to meditate on Him, that she expects after a while to be received up where He is, to be raised up out of the world and caught up into heaven, being assured that He loves her too well to let her remain at a distance from Him always.
Page 80 - Shadows from the fitful fire-light Dance upon the parlor wall; Then the forms of the departed Enter at the open door; The beloved, the true-hearted, Come to visit me once more; He, the young and strong, who cherished Noble longings for the strife, By the roadside fell and perished, Weary with the march of life!
Page 47 - The Night is mother of the Day, The Winter of the Spring, And ever upon old Decay The greenest mosses cling. Behind the cloud the starlight lurks, Through showers the sunbeams fall ; For God, who loveth all His works, Has left His hope with all...
Page 59 - She was raving with frenzy for reason had long since left its throne and her, a victim of madness. She came up to me, wild with insanity. I pointed to the glorious sun in the west, and in a moment she was calm ! She took...
Page 72 - Who loved thee so fondly as he ? He caught the first accents that fell from thy tongue, And joined in thy innocent glee.

Bibliographic information