The works of the English poets. With prefaces, biographical and critical, by S. Johnson, Volume 49

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Page 4 - This having reach'd, his brass-hoof'd steeds he reins, Fleet as the winds, and deck'd with golden manes. Refulgent arms his mighty limbs infold, Immortal arms of adamant and gold. He mounts the car, the golden scourge applies, He sits superior, and the chariot flies : His whirling wheels the glassy surface sweep ; The...
Page 271 - Shall he whose vengeance forms The forky bolt, and blackens heaven with storms, Shall he prolong one Trojan's forfeit breath ? A man, a mortal, pre-ordain'd to death ! And will no murmurs fill the courts above ? No gods indignant blame their partial Jove)' ' Go then (return'd the sire) without delay, Exert thy will : I give the fates their way.
Page 232 - And stretch'd the servant o'er his dying lord. As when a flame the winding valley fills, And runs on crackling shrubs between the hills; Then o'er the stubble up the mountain flies, Fires the high woods, and blazes to the skies, This way, and that, the spreading torrent roars : So sweeps the hero through the wasted shores...
Page 347 - Nineteen one mother bore — Dead, all are dead! How oft, alas ! has wretched Priam bled ! Still one was left, their loss to recompense; His father's hope, his country's last defence.
Page 336 - Lo! the sad father, frantic with his pain, Around him furious drives his menial train: In vain each slave with duteous care attends, Each office hurts him, and each face offends. "What make ye here, officious crowds!
Page 141 - ... plains, And give Achilles all that yet remains Of his and our Patroclus—" This, no more The time allow'd: Troy thicken'd on the shore.
Page 220 - In hope the realms of Priam to enjoy, And prove his merits to the throne of Troy? Grant that beneath thy lance Achilles dies, The partial monarch may refuse the prize; Sons he has many; those thy pride may quell: And 'tis his fault to love those sons too well.
Page 274 - Nor oath nor pact Achilles plights with thee : Such pacts as lambs and rabid wolves combine, Such leagues as men and furious lions join, To such I...
Page 326 - Helen, with the solemnities of the funeral. The time of twelve days is employed in this book, while the body of Hector lies in the tent of Achilles. And as many more are spent in the truce allowed for his interment. The scene is partly in Achilles
Page 230 - Mean intercourse of obloquy and pride! I know thy force to mine superior far; But heaven alone confers success in war: Mean as I am, the gods may guide my dart, And give it entrance in a braver heart." Then parts the lance: but Pallas...

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