NATO After 2000: The Future of the Euro-Atlantic Alliance

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 2001 - 161 pages

Borawski and Young provide a serious analysis of the major issues confronting European-North American relations. They draw detailed attention to the fundamental political and military issues before the Atlantic Alliance.

They illustrate that NATO remains essential to Euro-Atlantic security. Only the Atlantic Alliance can bring to bear well-tested military capability under US leadership to promote its members security, interests, and democratic values. However, to remain vital, the Alliance must undertake a serious review of its major purposes: enlargement to the former Warsaw Pact nations, a strategic partnership with Russia, defense against weapons of mass destruction, and a more mature transatlantic relationship drawing on the lessons of the former Yugoslavia. This is an important assessment for policymakers, military planners, scholars, students, and others concerned with current European-American relations.

 

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Contents

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Copyright

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About the author (2001)

JOHN BORAWSKI is an editor of the journal Helsinki Monitor, formerly director of the Political Committee of the NATO Parliamentary Assembly in Brussels, Belgium, and security advisor to the Parliamentary Assembly of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe.

THOMAS-DURELL YOUNG is European Program Manager at the Center for Civil-Military Relations at the US Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, and formerly Research Professor at the Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College, Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania.

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