The Life of John Milton: Narrated in Connexion with the Political, Ecclesiastical, and Literary History of His Time, Volume 4

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Macmillan and Company, 1877

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Page 64 - The Tenure of Kings and Magistrates PROVING THAT IT IS LAWFUL, AND HATH BEEN HELD SO THROUGH ALL AGES, FOR ANY WHO HAVE THE POWER TO CALL TO ACCOUNT A TYRANT, OR WICKED KING, AND AFTER DUE CONVICTION TO DEPOSE AND PUT HIM TO DEATH, IF THE ORDINARY MAGISTRATE HAVE NEGLECTED OR DENIED TO DO IT.
Page 197 - I beseech you, in the bowels of Christ, think it possible you may be mistaken.
Page 440 - CROMWELL, our chief of men, who, through a cloud Not of war only, but detractions rude, Guided by faith and matchless fortitude, To peace and truth thy glorious way hast plough'd...
Page 332 - If he turn not, he will whet his sword; he hath bent his bow, and made it ready.
Page 97 - I tell you, Sir, you have no other way to deal with these men, but to break them in pieces"; and thumping upon the Council table again, he said: "Sir, . . . if you do not break them they will break you...
Page 440 - Then to advise how war may best upheld Move by her two main nerves, iron and gold, In all her equipage...
Page 428 - A little onward lend thy guiding hand To these dark steps, a little further on; For yonder bank hath choice of sun or shade; There I am wont to sit, when any chance Relieves me from my task of servile toil, Daily in the common prison else enjoin'd me, Where I, a prisoner chain'd, scarce freely draw The air imprison'd also, close and damp, Unwholesome draught.
Page 139 - O Lord, triumph over me, and let my faults by thy hand be corrected, and make not mine unjust enemy the minister of thy justice. But yet, my God, if in thy wisdom this be the aptest chastisement for my...
Page 65 - ... till from the root of Adam's transgression, falling among themselves to do wrong and violence, and foreseeing that such courses must needs tend to the destruction of them all, they agreed by common league to bind each other from mutual injury, and jointly to defend themselves against any that gave disturbance or opposition to such agreement. Hence came cities, towns, and commonwealths.
Page 200 - Our spirits are comfortable, praised be the Lord, though our present condition be as it is. And indeed we have much hope in the Lord; of whose mercy we have had large experience.

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