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gents had

noon," and said he would “hunt his hunds till he was blin'.” Nothing was heard of the Cutitfat Hounds and their “ worthy master” for some time, at least not by us, until by accident we took up a paper published in the Squire's neighbourhood, and saw the account of the day's run mentioned above; we thought it was a hoax, and we have our doubts yet. It was afterwards seen in a London paper, and given forth to the world as a great feat of these hounds. We have had an account of the true day's sport from a person who was an eye-witness to most part of it, and we will see how it tallies with the published account. 'It seems “ M. Pill Thickset, Esq." and the

other gentlemen' are sporting gents, and the inost determined adherents of the Squire, in fact are great friends of bis, for Stumble does not care much who are his friends, if they only agree

with him, and are willing, after drinking and smoking all day, to drink and smoke all night. Well, Mr. Thickset and his friend and the Squire had made a night of it at Aylford, and on the next morning the hounds were advertised to meet at Drubhem Hall. Thickset and his friend had a fancy for a day's hunting, and they were anxions about the weather; it was not propitious, however, for at daylight it was a “black frost;" no one could ride, no dogs could run. Any one who knows the nature of frosts will be aware that what is called a “black frost” is one of the severest kind. Stumble thought it best to “make another day of it" instead of hunting; but the come out from the neighbouring town on purpose for a hunt, and a hunt they must have some way or other, they care nothing about frosts. By maneuvring they got the "worthy master” to order out the dogs, and away they went “pipe in mouth.” The Squire remarked on the way, “ It's see damned slape (slippery) ay can hardly stund, an ay wad'nt like to ride." No one thought of riding-in fact, no one who had any sense would have expected hounds to throw off on such a day, it was so hard and slippery, and the “ brilliant field assembled” consisted of our three worthies and their sticks. They drew Bydone Wood and found immediately;" this we believe was true enough, but our heroes, if we may so call them, lost the hounds shortly after, and did not again see them until some of them had crossed the River Deepe in pursuit of the fox; they came up with by far the greater portion of the dogs, who had not courage to swim the river on so cold a day; they could not be persuaded at all to follow further. The river could not be got across without getting wet up to the waist, and our friends had not got their blood up to sufficient heat, and therefore thought it better to leave the dogs that had crossed alone, and they would soon come back. Stumble seeing that some of those about him had cut themselves with running, thought they had better drop for the day, and as they were near “Oad Nanny Brewker's," they would go in and have a “pint" till the other dogs “cast up;" accordingly they went into “ Oad Nanny's,” and drank sundry quarts of beer and “half glasses” of brandy, and smoked innumerable pipes of tobacco. With an eye to business, one of the sporting gents proposed they should play at “ pitch and toss," as it was a slow work' drinking and nobody saying anything, for it appears they were remarkably silent. The table

was put out of the way, and at it they went upon the floor, first for halfpence, and then for glasses round,” and when they had got the steam up again, Mr. Thickset said he would jump either of the others over the table for a “sov.” The bet was taken: Mr. Thickset put off his coat and looked nervous-principally about the “sov.” we should think, for if we could only have looked into his pockets, we would have found no sovereign there-he took a spring up to try whether he could do it or not, and then swung his arms fiercely about, until he knocked a pot of ale out of old Nanny Brewker's hands, and then away he went at the “ rasper,” as he called it : next he was seen lying on the floor, with the table on the top of hin, and one of his eyes looking inflamed, which, as you watched it, seemed undergoing some process of colouring generally attained by what Grantley Berkeley calls a “punch ;” in the end it turned out to be one of the finest specimens of a black eye

that we have seen. Before order was restored after this mishap of Mr. Thickset's, the hounds (that would not cross the river, and which were prowling about the inn) gave mouth, and on our sporting gents rushing out, they found them in full view after the fox, which the other few dogs had again brought into their neighbourhood; he was nearly “used up," and the fresh dogs getting laid on, of course sealed his doom; they killed him in five minutes, and the three worthies had the pleasure of being in at the death and “brushing him.” They had got so jolly, and were so elated with getting the brush, that it was determined amongst them that, like sportsmen of old, they should have the fox's head put into a can of beer, and then drink it with the head swimming about in it; this was done by way of a “finish,” and it says much for their stomachs that none of them were sick after following this old fashion. Mr. Thickset, next day, on his appearing in his usual places of resort, was questioned by his friends as to the reason for his having his eye in mourning; and, putting as good a face upon the matter as he could with his damaged one, he told them that he had had “ a devil of a hunt with the Cutitfat Hounds, and how he was going to clear on his horse two hedges at once, one on each side of a narrow lane, but which it seems was too much, and so his horse came down and pitched biin on to a hedge-stake in the second fence, which nearly put his eye out; but nevertheless he was in at the death, although nearly killed himself.” This story passed current with his friends, but whether there was one amongst them who thought it a hoax too good to be kept secret, or whether it was M. Pill Thickset, Esq., himself who wished to see his name in the newspapers, for

“ 'Tis pleasant sure to see one's name in print,'' we do not know ; but whoever it was who composed the very excellent account of the sport, at which no one was present all the time, the local papers are, in the first instance, indebted to him, and in the next place, the Editor of a sporting paper is indebted to him for making

paper the vehicle to distribute this “ Pill” (whether Morrison's or Thickset's) to the world; but if it is expected to be swallowed quietly, we are afraid they are in the wrong box.”

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frans of his far Stumble = Sessite all day, to drink and ed as friend and the Squire

et the next burning the seasoning, and they were soxious in the easies, brate, for at daylight it as an ines could run. Ang me he se il be see that what is called ==this seases Stumble thought it best => make me seal of hunting; but the gents had come out for the Son purpose for a hunt, and a es les mes be see the care nothing about fress Bs maneuring these teadmaster to order out tre des ani anathe went pipe in mod The Squire the ad ce te is second stage Stopery) ay can farly stead,

ale nie we are hages of riding – fact, no ese she had any sense would hare expected bounds to throw off on such a day, it was so bed and pers, and the “ brilliant field assembled consisted of our te sorties and their sils "They drew Bydone Wood and found immediately; this we believe was true enough, but our beroes, if we may so call them, lest de hounds shortly after, and did not again see them until some of the had crossed the River Deepe in parsuit of the fox ; they came with by far the greater portion of the dogs, who had not courtesy swim the river on so cold a day; they could not be persuaded and to follow further. The river could not be got across withont et, wet up to the waist, and our friends had not got their blood up sufficient heat, and therefore thought it better to leave the dogs till had crossed alone, and they would soon come back. Stumble to ing that some of those about him had cut themselves with raming thought they had better drop for the day, and as they want « Oad Nanny Brewker's," they would go in a the other dogs" cast up;" accordi Nanny's," and drank sundryp brandy, and smoked innumer business, one of the spor "pitch and toss," as it ing anything, for it a

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A VISIT TO JACKSON'S HUNTING AND GENERAL

RIDING SCHOOL, HARROW ROAD.

BY LORD WILLIAM LENNOX.

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There is an old saying, that “half the world (alluding to the London world) are not aware of what the other half are about;" and certainly we plead guilty to the above remark; for, after a long life in the metropolis, we were not made acquainted until last week with the existence of Jackson's Hunting and General Riding School. It may be true, that "not to know Jackson was to be ourselves unknown;" still such was the startling fact; and nothing but the arrival of a friend of ours from the country would have relieved us from this state of barbarism. Our friend (we always adopt the editorial plural) was anxious to purchase a couple of hunters; and hearing that Mr. Jackson had a long string of first-rate nags, we proceeded to his grounds. Anxious to adopt an old joke, and “ do the thing han'som,we ensconced ourselves in a very good-looking, patent, Hansom cab, with an ondeniable varmint, thoroughbred stepper, in it, and an out-and-out "jarvy;" and desired him to drive to the Hunting Grounds. Passing along Oxford Street, or Hawksvut Street as he called it, thereby changing every original letter in the name, we entered the Bayswater Road, and made the best of our way to the Black Lion Lane; here we made a short turn to our right; and proceeding through new streets, reached the spot we sought for. Some few years ago, Jackson's Hunting Ground was a few miles out of town; now you have brick and mortar the whole way. Upon approaching this sporting locale, the country appears quite open to the eye; and we were fancying ourselves some miles distant from the metropolis, when a whiz and a smoke broke the enchantment, and we found ourselves close to the Great Western Railroad. After anathematizing modern improvements, and condoling over the innovation of steam and iron, we entered Mr. Jackson's arena. At the door of a small pavilion, on the left-hand side as you enter, we found the presiding genius. He received us most cordially, and ordered his ostler to parade his numerous stud before us. The grounds consist of a large grass ridge and furrow field, bounding which is a gallop, inclosed by a railing; and at the ex· tremity is another inclosed gallop, upon which may be found every species of fence, from a simple hurdle to a broad ditch and stakebound fence. There is the stone wall, the five-barred gate, the brook, the fence, the in-and-out clever, the water, and stiff-bound inclosure. The stables are excellent; and the riding-school is a model of perfection. The ride is covered over; while the interior circle, or rather oblong, is a garden filled with the choicest flowers: here, also, are every sort of leaps, from the two-foot hurdle to a double post and rail. Mr. Jackson gives lessons in equitation; and I cannot con

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