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eminent architect, author of Sporting Architecture, &c., &c. It was however, finally and decisively rejected; the chief reason for opposing it being that a grand stand, though an acknowledged improvement and considerable assistance to most places of sport, would at Newmarket altogether alter the established system and character of the meetings. In accordance with the custom of the time some railway talk was also introduced, and a resolution passed to support (in conjunction with “King Hudson") the Newmarket and Chesterford line, provided that the promoters of it introduce such clauses as the stewards of the Jockey Club think necessary.

The late Mr. Rawlinson's horses—Coronation and Co., are advertized for sale at Hyde Park Corner, on Monday the 10th of this month. It is said £800 has already been refused for Coningsby, the yearling colt by Venison, out of the crack's dam.

The anti-thimble-rig edict appears already to be affecting the great as well as small, it being just announced on authority that Gorhambury Park--that incipient Goodwood—will no more be thrown open, as the arena for Olympic feats. The cause, though not publicly stated, is, no doubt, a considerable deficit in the premia palma.

After some doubt, we have ventured to run-up the few names quoted into a table of the business done on the Derby—a race for which Sting's performance in the Second October would (if anything more were wanting) of itself go far to establish him as the winter first favourite. The Criterion has yet, thongh—for we write in advance-to be decided; and that well over, as we rather expect it will be, what with the extra weight and work all taken into consideration, “ the next time of asking,” we calculate, will find him at some few points even below the present not-over-tempting price. Forth still has him in charge, the blue and buff party being quite content with so apt an agent. On the Cesarewitch and Cambridge it becomes us not to speak in this place, when we have “our commissioner" so eloquent on one in these presents, and to be on the other next month.

Since writing the above, we find Sting won the Criterion in a canter, but no move in the market has yet been reported. THE DERBY, 1846. October 6. October 15. October 20. October 23. October 28. (Newmkt.)

(Newmkt.) Sting.

1 Brocardo

- 1
Spithead
Arkwright
Ginger
Fancy Boy.
Iago
Hovingham

THE DERBY, 1847.-The following bets have during the month been laid on this next time but one:-10,000 to 200 agst. Col. Peels King of Naples; 10,000 to 150 agst. Lord Glasgow's Amulet colt; 10,000 to 150 agst. Lord Miltown's Cruiskeen colt; 10,000 to 150 agst. Mr. Worley's Golden Drop colt; 10,000 to 150 agst. Mr. Worley's Old Port; 10,000 to 150 agst. Mr. O'Brien's The Liberator; 5,000 to 100 agst. Lord Orford's Sister to Mango ; 5,000 to 100 agst. Lord Eglinton's Van Trump; 2,500 to 50 agst. Mr. F. R. Clarke's Miles's Boy.

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DECEMBER, 1845.

EMBELLISHMENTS.

GONE TO GROUND.--ENGRAVED BY E. HACKER, FROM A PAINT

ING BY J. BATEMAN.

FRESH WATER FARE. ENGRAVED BY J. WESTLEY, FROM A

PAINTING BY NIEMANN.

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CONTENTS.

Page. DIARY FOR DECEMBER. NEWMARKET HOUGHTON MEETING, BY CRAVEN.

351 GONE TO GROUND

357 A FORTNIGHT IN CHESHIRE: HOOTON, LISKARD, BIRKENHEAD, LIVERPOOL.-BY LORD WILLIAM LENNOX

360 FRESH-WATER FARE . ON THE GAME-LAWS, SHOOTING, ETC.-BY CECIL

. 373 THE PAST RACING SEASON.-BY CASTOR

378 WILD SPORTS IN THE FAR WEST.-BY PERCY B. ST. JOAN, ESQ.

384 SALMON FISHING IN IRELAND.BY FORSAYTH

388 RECOLLECTIONS OF OTTER HUNTING .

390 NOTITIA VENATICA.-BY R. T. VYNER, ESQ.

395 A FEW OBSERVATIONS ON THE ARGUMENTS OF THE GAMELAW REPEALERS.-BY R. B. S.

403 OXFORD PARODIES.—BY THE AUTHOR OF HINTS TO FRESHMEN,” ETC.

406 THE FIELD AND ITS ASSOCIATIONS. BY AN OLD ENGLANDER

407 THE BIRTH-DAY PRESENT.-BY AN OXONIAN

410 LITERATURE.

411 PUBLIC AMUSEMENTS OF THE METROPOLIS

415 STATE OF THE ODDS, ETC.

418

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TURF REGISTER. BROMSGROVE RIPON ASHTON AND

STALYBRIDGE MARLBOROUGH-HOYLAKE -BARNET-
STIRLING-PEMBROKESHIRE ROCHDALE-DEVON AND
EXETER-TUNBRIDGE WELLS-YORK AUGUST MEETING

PAISLEY STOURBRIDGE-HUNTING DON EGHAM
HEREFORD-SALISBURY_STOCKTON

91-96 D D

First Quar., 6 day, at 52 min. past 2 morn.
Full Moon, 13 day, at 43 min. past 6 afternoon.
Last Quar., 21 day, at 27 min. past 11 afternoon.
New Moon, 28 day, at 53 min. past 10 afternoon.

sets.

M.W.

Sun Moon High WATER D. D. OCCURRENCES.

rises and rises & London Bridge. sets.

morn. I aftern

h. m. d. h. m. h. m. h. m. 1 M Bury St. Edmunds Fair. r7 46 2 6a21 2 50 3 14 2 T Sputty Fair.

s 3 52 3 7 37 3 36 3 58 3 WROOTE HUNT STEEPLE CHASE. Ir 7 49 4 8 55 4 22 4 45 4T MORPETH COURSING MEETING. s 3 51 5 10 15 5 11 5 39 5 F RIDGWAY COURSING MEETING. r7 52 611 32 6 6 6 33 6 S Spalding Fair.

s 3 50 7 morn./ 6 58 7 29 7 5 Second Sunday in Adbent. r 7 54 8 0 46 8 2 8 35 8M NMkt. Campy. C. M. Leicester s 3 49 9 1 58 9 10 9 46 9 T Grouse-shooting ends. [Fairr 7 5610 2 910 2010 57 10W CALEDONIAN COURSING MEET. s 3 4911 4 17 11 2911 53 11 T TARLETON OPEN COURS. Mr. r7 58 12 5 23 0 25 12 F Stour port Fair.

s 3 49 13 6 24 0 49 1 11 13 s Frodsham Fair.

r 8 OF rises 1 34 1 55 14 5 Third Sunday in adbent. s 3 49 15 4a55 2 15 2 33 15 M Bridgenorth & Oakham Foirs. r 8 2 16 5 52 2 52 3 11 16 T Cambridge Term ends. [ Chases 3 4917 6 53 3 28 3 44 17 W Oxf. T. ends. S. Devon STEEPLET 8 418 7 56 4 1 4 16 18 T March C. M. Amesbury F. s 3 4919 8 59 4 32 4 52 19 FALTCAR Open COURS. MEET. r 8 520 10 3 5 10 5 28 20 s Cornen Fair. [Shortest Day.s 3 502111 8 5 46 6 7 21 Fourth Sunday in Adbent. r 8 622 morn. 6 27 6 46 22 M Newport Pagnell Fair. s 3 5123 0 15 7 9 7 36 23 T Swindon Fair.

r 8 724 1 24 8 6 8 36 24 W Hawarden Fair.

s 3 52 25 2 35 9 10 9 46 25 T Christmas Day.

r 8 826 3 49 10 20 10 56 26 F St. Stephen,

s 3 5427 5 111 29 27 S St. John.

r 8 828 6 11 0 1 0 31 28 $ First Sunday after Christmass 3 55 N sets 0 54 1 21 29 M Gargrave Fair.

r8 9 1 5 a 9 1 47 2 11 30 T Helston Fair.

s 3 57 2 6 30 2 36 3 3 311w

r 8 9 3 7 53 3 27 3 49

........ 17

STEEPLE CHASES IN DECEMBER.
Roote Hunt (Antrim)...... 3 | South Devon (two)

COURSING MEETINGS IN DECEMBER.
North Berwick & Dirleton .. 3 | Newmarket Champion 8 | Tarleton Open ......10 & 11
Spiddal...

3 & 4 Nottingham.. ....8 & 10 / South Lancashire (SouthRidgway (Southport).. 3, 4 & 5 Mountain's Town ......9 & 10 port) ....

.17 & 18 Morpeth (Bothai open).. 4 & 5 | Caledonian

........ 10 March (Cambsh.) 17, 18, & 19 Ridgway

4 & 5 Glossop (Howard's Town) 10 | Altcar (open)........ 18 & 19 Hornby Park (Catterick), North Derby (Cromford), Morpeth (Mitford), and Great Smeaton, not fixed.

NEWMARKET HOUGHTON MEETING.

BY CRAVEN.

This was a race-week, both in the letter and the spirit; it extended over six good days, and produced a vast amount of good sport. Indeed, the only objection that might be urged against it was that perhaps it gave us too much of a good thing. There are among the disciples of Young England those who contend that the races at Newmarket are too much after the toujours perdrix system. If there be such a thing as making a toil of a pleasure, to bet all day and a considerable portion of the night should seem to belong to the category. Neither did the hunger and thirst after business satisfy themselves here, for a vast number of common “Hades” were in full operation, and every contrivance of ordinary gambling was in grim requisition. Thus was there not alone the perdrix, but the pigeons and the hawks-in short, a whole aviary at work. It is a source of congratulation that this latter nuisance attracted the notice of the Jockey Club, who, " through their clerk," called the magistrates' attention to a matter in the which they ought to have ministered to themselves. One would have thought these gentlemen, living in a rural district so renowned for sporting subtleties, would have required no hint as to the mischief done by the family of accipitres ; but again, it may be urged their toleration of the “hells” arose out of their instinctive leaning towards the preservation of game.

The last week at Newmarket was ushered in with its coming events casting their shadows before—that is, those issues whereupon the too-confiding public had previously put their money to a considerable tune. The close of the Second October saw the wane of the melody; and now all was discord. Now it was announced that the lion of the Cambridgeshire-the Baron-was actually the property of another party-whence people entertained a doubt whether it was meant that he should win his engagement or not; while Alarm still remained in the hands of his Derby proprietor, who stated it was uncertain whether his horse would start for his Newmarket engagement or not. The first case excited the indignation of the sporting circles—the latter only their dissatisfaction. For myself, I cannot see one " cent" of difference between losing cash by means of a horse which comes to the post, and one that remains in the stable. It was said Mr. Greville threw out the possibility of his not running Alarm, because the public had stolen a march on him in backing his horse before he himself had "got on.” Alarm was first favourite for the Derby on his meritsand when it was known that he was in form, he had a right to be backed at the odds current on him for the Cambridgeshire Handicap -at the weight he had to carry. The fact of his being “fit” of course was made known through the touts; and then came the rush to get on him. The layers round were soon stalled off, and hinc ille lachryma." There can, however, henceforth be no scintilla of the radiance of honour obscured by the owner of a first favourite for any great race-for which the public have backed him, from his public form, for all their money-coming forward on the eve of the race, and announcing his intention of starting his horse or letting it alone, according to circumstances. I say, henceforward this must be regarded as in accordance with the chivalrous observance of the honourable obligations of horse-racing. Yet I cannot but imagine if Sting continued the ostensible property of my talented friend of Mitchellgrove up to the 25th of May next-did he, on the afternoon of that day, step forth at Tattersall's, and proclaim the possibility of his probibiting the appearance of his horse at Epsom on the afternoon of the 27th then next ensuing--that there would incontinently be a considerable shindy. I say I believe people would call him—on the strength of that notification--an old thief, an old vagabond, a septegenarian swindler, a murderer, upon the authority of Shakspeare, who declares

you take a man's life"" when ye do take the means whereby he lives.'' And I am not sure but I should subscribe to that opinion. The official treatment of the sale of the Baron was in this wise : In a paper of the day it was stated that Mr. Greville being put into possession of that fact on the conclusion of the Second October Meeting, and also that the horse had become the property of persons who were prominent in betting against him for the Cambridgeshire, being himself a backer of the horse for that event, thought the affair called for the interposition of the Jockey Club. Under the influence of that impression he went to the Messrs. Wetherby, and requested them-it was so stated—to lay his complaint before that society, and the Messrs. Wetherby accordingly gave notice to the stewards. Subsequent inquiries led that gentleman to believe that the new owners of the horse had altered their plans, and that instead of preventing the horse from starting, they had determined on running him to win. (Haud meus hic sermo." I indeed cannot well understand how Mr. Greville was to prefer a charge before his brethren of the Jockey Club, grounded on preventing a horse from starting for a race. I quote from a sporting journal merely). This so completely altered the position of things, that on the meeting of the Club on Monday in the Houghton, Mr. Greville intimated to the Messrs. Wetherby that he had no complaint to prefer. Lord George Bentinck, however, deemed it necessary that the occurrence should not pass sub silentio, especially as insinuations had been thrown out that a young gentleman, who has of late distinguished himself by the extent and spirit of his betting--this, I presume, means Mr. Clifton—had been in some way mixed up in the business. (Lord George Bentinck dealt with the matter like a man of honour and practical good sense, as he does with everything he takes in hand). On the part of that gentleman, he said he was perfectly willing to submit his betting-book to the stewards, and to show by other evidence that, as far as he was concerned, the suspicions excited were totally without foundation. Mr. Greville said he was no party to the insinuations alluded to, and, in fact, was in utter ignorance that they existed. He had no charge of any sort to prefer, and therefore he did not consider that the club was called upon to proceed farther. After some discussion, however, it was deemed proper that some declaration should be publicly made,

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