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THE FINE ARTS.

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The Start FOR THE MEMORABLE DERBY OP 1814. — In our May Number, we stated that this remarkable sporting subject had

put on canvass by the celebrated painter in that branch of art, Mr. Herring, and purchased from him at a sporting price, by the Messrs. Fores of Piccadilly, for the purpose of being, engraved, This most interesting work, to all who are concerned in the national sport of horse-racing, is now in course of publication ; and we can unhesitatingly say, that it is by many degrees the most splendidly coloured print ever executed in this country. As they have been so lately alluded to in these pages, we do not think it necessary here to enter into its details; but in the present condition of the turf, when things connected with it have apparently come to the worst, we would say to every turfite, “Go and look at that sketch-as graphic as 'the writing on the wall’—of the first great crash of the thunderstorm, which we trust has cleared the racing atmosphere;—go, and look at it; and if you come away without a copy, you have less zeal and less taste than we could desire to give you discredit for.”

STATE OF THE ODDS, &c.

It would be altogether inconsistent with the space and character of this paper to attempt to enter into any detail of the serious matters that have lately been discussed in the racing world, and we must therefore confine ourselves to a record of the different sentences passed, taking them in chronological order. The first, known as “the Old England affair,” a decision, we may add, in which every honest man must concur, runs thus :

"The Stewards of the Jockey Club having attended at Messrs. Weatherby's office, in Burlington-street, on Saturday the 31st of May, and by adjournment on Monday the 2nd of June, to hear a charge brought by Mr. Gully against Mr. J. F. Bloodsworth and William Stebbings, of having conspired to bet against Old England for the Derby, in connection with William Day, and through information clandestinely derived from him, and subsequently to lame, or, by other means, to prevent the said horse running for that race ; having heard the confession of William Day, and the evidence of William Barrett, jun., and of John Day, sen., are satisfied that Messrs.

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THE START FOR THE MEMORABLE DERBT O: jmeno
May Number, we stated that this remarkable surur: --
been put on canvass by the celebrated painter i la
Mr. Herring, and purchased from him at a spurtir,
Messrs. Fores of Piccadilly, for the purpose
This most interesting work, to all who are concu
sport of horse-racing, is now in course of pa:

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unhesitatingly say, that it is by many degree 14
coloured print ever executed in this countri
lately alluded to in these pages, we do no: *
enter into its details; but in the present cu
things connected with it have apparentis coup !
say to every turfite, “Go and look a: Luz
'the writing on the wall'—of the fire 2 =.
storm, which we trust has cleared the facer
look at it; and if you come away withus
and less taste than we could desire to 215.

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STATE OF TEL

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"The Stewards in Burlington-st the 2nd of June worth and Will the Derby, in c derived from hii horse running

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y of a change, almost in every ind, on the close it of the business. ssionals; and con

Bloodsworth and Stebbings did conspire to bet against Old England. That commu. nication was kept up by Stebbings writing letters through Bloodsworth to William Day, which letters were sent under cover to William Barrett, jun., of Stockbridge, for several months. It appeared that William Day and William Barrett, jun., did, on different occasions, meet Stebbings at Bloodworth's house in London, and at other places, to carry out their plans. It was also positively stated by William Day and William Barrett, that Stebbings did, at Bloodsworth's house, recommend that the horse's foot should be bruised by striking it with a hard stone, or by tying a handkerchief round the leg and striking the sinew with a stick, and if that was not sufficient, that he, Stebbings, could easily get a powder which, being mixed with the corn, would stop him. They added that Bloodsworth was averse to the last part of this proposal, saying it was a lagging affair. Messrs. Bloodsworth and Stebbings denied the whole story of having desired William Day to maim the horse, but admitted that they had betted largely against Old England in consequence of the information they had obtained from William Day; and Stebbings acknowledged that he had received full information from William Day for several years as to the qualities and condition of horses in John Day's stables, and had betted largely for himself and for William Day in consequence of such information.

6. The Stewards therefore order

" That J. F. Bloodsworth, William Stebbings, and William Day be warned off

the course at Newmarket, and out of the Coffee-room Yard there, and that

William Day be not permitted to ride in any race at Newmarket. “They also recommend the proprietors and stewards of all race courses where the

rules of the Jockey Club are in force, to prevent them from appearing on
such courses.

STRADBROKE.
“Signed Rosslyn (for the Marquis of Exeter).

Geo. Anson."

Following closely on William Day's case, we have the curious, almost inexplicable libel started and supported with such extraordinary pertinacity by that really great ornament to the turf, as far as horsemanship was concerned, his brother John. The judgment passed here will be found to be equally severe. There is, however, a very general feeling abroad that in this instance justice should be tempered, and the term of banishment from “the means whereby he gets his bread” limited to a certain period, instead of hanging over the offender for life. Still, perhaps, the public do not know the worst; and all we can say on this head is one word to the injured gentleman, Mr. Crommelin. This, it will be recollected, is the second very unpleasant affair in which his name has been mixed up within only the last few months, and we certainly think that if, as it is reported, he has it in his power to publish the whole of the evidence, it would be but an act of justice to his own reputation to do so without delay. It is wonderful the odd suppositions and reports these secret investigations give rise to. At present, all we have "upon authority” is as follows :

“ The Stewards of the Jockey Club, assisted by the Marquis of Normanby and Col. Peel, having met on Saturday the 14th of June, and again, by adjournment, on Tuesday the 17th, and Wednesday the 18th, to inquire into a charge preferred against Mr. Crommelin, came to the following decision :

"• We have examined into the charge against Mr. Crommelin, of having offered John Day, jun., a large bribe to procure the defeat of the horse then called the Melody colt, in the Derby of 1810. This charge, founded upon a statement made to Mr. Etwall, the proprietor of the horse, by John Day, jun., was supported only by his own evidence, which we find to be utterly unworthy of belief, contradicted as it

Fas on many important points by letters in his own handwriting of that date, ad. dressed to Mr. Crommelin, and produced by him.

" • It having been necessary, for Mr. Crommelin's defence, that he should place these letters in evidence before us, we further find from their contents, that subsequent to this period both John Day, sen., and John Day, jun., had not only continued but increased their intimacy with Mr. Crommelin, whom one accused and the other believed capable of such atrocious villany, and that to this person John Day, jun., was in the habit of confiding the secrets of the stable.

"The nature of this connexion appears to us to have been discreditable to all the parties concerned, but considering the length of time that has elapsed since these transactions occurred, we think it unnecessary now to take any further steps with respect to this part of the case, than to give the strongest expression of our opinion, that such a connexion as has been established is calculated to destroy that confidence in the faithful attention of public trainers to the legitimate interests of their several masters, on the security of which the continued prosperity of the Turf can alone rest.

" • John Day, jun., having before us endeavoured to support a criminal charge by wilful falsehood, we direct that he be warned off the course at Newmarket, and out of the Coffee-room yard there, and be not permitted to ride in any race at Newmarket.

" " We also recommend the proprietors and stewards of all race-courses where the rules of the Jockey Club are in force, to prevent him from from appearing on such courses.

" (Signed) • STRADBROKE • NORMANBY
• EXETER

J. PEEL.'

. GEORGE ANSON ** June 18, 1845."

“Doctots differ" is an old saying that will be found to apply equally to horse-doctors and man-doctors. Mr. Barrow and Mr. Bartlett stopt an unfortunate man in a highly creditable endeavour to pay his debts, with, moreover, an excellent chance of profiting something further, by a prompt and decided avowal that the agent employed was not qualified, and that the master, in fact, was trying on a stale trick, that has failed signally in two or three recent instances. The accused was Mr. Wagstaff, his mare the Queen of Cyprus, and the charge so confidently disposed of, that she was four instead of three years old-a decree that stayed Lord George Bentinck in his offer to take her in lieu of nine hundred pounds, with the proviso of another thousand if she won the Oaks. And now, when Mr. Wagstaff, in all the strength of innocence, presses for further confirmation, lo! Messrs. Field, Spooner, and Symonds, the very heads of their professions, declare the mare to be just the age in which she was entered! Of a truth there can be very little truth in a horse's mouth, or not too much in—we need not say more. Something in the way of compensation for a certain nine hundred, and a thousand in perspective, will surely be forwarded by those learned veterinarians--Barrow and Bartlett.

A subscription or tithe gathering has been started to defray the costs, after deducting what was allowed by law, incurred by the owner of the actual winner in bringng the Running Rein matter to a successful issue. The amount is £3,065; and it is confidently expected, that every gainer by Orlando's victory will send in his proportion of the sum. The winnings already declared are £31,658. A very

few words will suffice for the Derby settling. By way of a change, it was one of the best ever known. Those who had to pay, almost in every case did so : and, as a natural sequitur, the book winners found, on the close of the Tuesday, the pocket could correspond in its account of the business. The heaviest winners, as a class, are of course the professionals; and con

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