Vogel and Motulsky's Human Genetics: Problems and Approaches

Front Cover
The fourth, completely revised edition of this classical reference and textbook presents a cohesive and up-to-date exposition of the concepts, results, and problems underlying theory and practice in human and medical genetics. In the 10 years since the appearance of the third edition, many new insights have emerged for understanding the genetic basis of development and function in human health and disease. Human genetics, with its emphasis on molecular concepts and techniques, has become a key discipline in medicine and the biomedical sciences.

The fourth edition has been extensively expanded by new chapters on hot topics such as epigenetics, pharmacogenetics, gene therapy, cloning and genetic epidemiology. In addition a section giving an overview on the main model organisms (mouse, canine, dog, worm, fly, yeast) used in human genetics research has been introduced.

This book will be of interest to human and medical geneticists, scientists in all biomedical sciences, physicians and epidemiologists, as well as to graduate and postgraduate students who desire to learn the fundamentals of this fascinating field.

 

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Contents

History of Human Genetics
3
Chromosomes
25
Genes and
83
Modes of Inheritance
129
Conclusions
160
Linkage Analysis and Gene Clusters
163
Direct Observation of Pedigrees Statistical Analysis The Use of lod Scores
169
Multifactorial Inheritance and Common Diseases
195
Induction by lonizing Radiation and Chemicals
495
Phenylketonuria 2616000 and Hyperphenylalaninemia Other Conditions
507
Distribution of AB0 Alleles in the World Population Syphilis and Blood
541
Consanguinity Genetic Drift
549
Consanguinity Genetic Drift
570
Conclusions
580
of Certain Segments Chromosome Rearrangements in Evolution
592
Human Evolution
604

Animal Experiments
211
Distributed Characteristics
238
Conclusions
251
Genetic Diseases
257
of the Metabolic Defect Dietary Treatment of Metabolic Diseases May Be Only
296
Other Types of Hemoglobin Mutations
310
Transcription or Promoter Mutations RNA Cleavage
317
Receptors Familial Hypercholesterolemia
348
Developmental Genetics
361
Conclusions
380
Spontaneous Mutation in Germ Cells
385
Use of Chromosomal Variants and DNA Markers
392
New Research on Paternal and Maternal Age Influences Cell Divisions
405
Conclusions
426
and Tumor Formation Due to Somatic Mutation
434
Somatic Mutation Cancer and Aging
442
Conclusions
454
Conclusions
490
Conclusions
618
Research Strategies and Examples
623
Research Strategies and Examples
674
Conclusions
683
Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia
693
Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia
700
Conclusions
703
Conclusions
710
Genetic Counseling and Prenatal Diagnosis
720
Mothers at Risk for Chromosomal Malformations Screening
726
Genetic Manipulations and the Biological Future
733
Methods for Estimating Gene Frequencies
749
Data Bases and Expert Systems
757
Heritability Estimates from Twin Data
769
Genetic Counseling
775
Programs and Examples
783
Standardized Nomenclature for Human Genes
793
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Arno Gunther Motulsky was born in Fischhausen, Germany on July 5, 1923. In 1939, he was one of more than 900 Jewish refugees aboard the German liner St. Louis who were turned away from Cuba and the United States. Before returning to Germany, four countries agreed to take one-fourth of the passengers. His family was assigned to Belgium. On May 10, 1940, the Germans invaded Belgium. Even though the family had just received United States visas, they were unable to leave. Motulsky was sent to an internment camp in France. In June 1941, he left France and traveled through Spain to Portugal, where he boarded a ship to the United States. In 1942, he passed the high school equivalency tests in Chicago. He worked and began taking college courses at Central Y.M.C.A. College. In 1943, he had been accepted to medical school at the University of Illinois at Chicago. However, he was drafted and the Army sent him to Yale University to finish his premedical courses. He returned to the University of Illinois for medical school, entering as a private first class. He graduated in 1947 and took further training in internal medicine and hematology. In 1951, he was called back into the Army and assigned to Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, where he studied inherited blood disorders. He was discharged in 1953. After being discharged, he became an instructor at the University of Washington's new medical school in Seattle. He taught internal medicine and hematology. He was the founder of medical genetics and pharmacogenetics. In 1957, he started one of the first divisions of medical genetics in the United States. He was the author of more than 400 scientific articles. He and Friedrich Vogel wrote the textbook, Human Genetics: Problems and Approaches, in 1979. Motulsky died on January 17, 2018 at the age of 94.

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