Transgression as a Rule: German-Polish Cross-border Cooperation, Border Discourse and EU-enlargement

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LIT Verlag Münster, 2007 - 279 pages
Whereas currently, German-Polish relations are marked by irritations, the previous phase of politics and discourse from 1990 leading up to the EU-accession of Poland was marked by an increasing stress on Europe in both countries. This was connected with changing practices of cross-border cooperation as well as a change in academic border studies. Transgression as a Rule argues that resulting from this, cross-border cooperation has become a rule. The actors negotiate new, contradictory spaces for their actions: supported by the state but partly uncomfortable with it, drawing on the powerful discourse of cooperation and trying to escape from it. Their practices can also inform the practices of border studies.
 

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Contents

IV33 Aristocratic lands in uncaring hands
128
IV34 The past intrudes into the present consciousness
129
IV35 Contesting the Germanisation of the past
131
IV36 Silesia as contested
132
IV4 Borderlands
133
IV42 ReInterpreting Easternness
135
IV43 A strange country
137
IV5 The criminal landscape
138

II22 Ambiguous borderlands and borders in flux
17
II23 The role of border studies
18
II24 Border studies now and then
20
II3 Reassessing border studies
21
II32 The inside and the outside of the territorial state
23
II33 Prescribed transgressions
24
II34 Beyond the limits of border studies
26
II4 Deleuze and Guattari and border studies
27
II41 Transgression borders and the state
29
II42 Borders practice and the state
31
II43 The history of the relation between transgression and regression
32
II44 Border studies and transgression
34
III The histories of the German and Polish Other
37
II1 Histories and nationalisms of Germany and Poland
42
The butterfly and the wolf
46
creating the Self and the Other
48
III21 The creation of the Self in Germany and Poland
49
III22 The enlightened the laborious and the invention of the Polish economy
54
the Drang nach Osten
58
Mitteleuropadebates
59
III25 Polish spaces
61
redefining the relation between Self and Other
65
Poland becomes not noticeable
66
III32 National Socialism planning and the East
67
towards European discourse
71
III42 Poland after World War Two
75
The history of GermanPolish Selves and Others
78
IV Methodology
80
IV11 Defining the field
81
IV12 Encounters and interaction
82
IV2 Methods and fieldwork
84
IV22 Interviewing
87
IV23 Newspaper archive research
89
IV3 Analysis methods
92
IV32 Analysis of the interviews
94
IV33 Analysis of the newspaper articles
95
3 Finally I wrote the chapters and translated the extracts IV4 Conclusion to the methodoloy
96
V GermanPolish politics in the 1990s
98
V1 The GermanPolish border
100
V2 Geopolitical alignments
101
V3 Uneasy relations with the Other
103
V4 Polish German and Other populations
105
V5 Reconciliation and crossborder cooperation
110
V6 Conclusion
112
IV German discourse on Poland
114
IV1 First encounters with a strange land
115
IV2 Travelwriting about Germany and Poland
117
IV21 The gaze of the traveller
118
IV22 Modifications of the gaze
121
IV23 Border migrants
122
IV24 The eastern journey as a challenge to the stereotypes
123
IV3 Backwardlooking worlds
125
IV32 The unreal mode
126
IV52 Criminal flows and routes
140
IV53 Writing in the Gothic mode
141
IV54 Writing the crime out of Poland
142
IV6 Geopolitical operations
143
IV7 Good examples
145
IV72 The Oder as a symbol of change
146
The German discourse on Poland
147
VII Polish discourse on Germany
150
VII21 Historical repercussions
154
VII22 Stereotypes of Poland
155
VII23 Returning and shifting the gaze
157
Berlin as a central place
160
VII4 German and Polish borderlands
163
VII42 Lost connections and approaches rejected
166
VII43 The abandoned German borderlands
167
VII44 The connected Polish side
169
VII5 Drang nach Osten and Westen
170
The new Drang
171
Drang as flight
172
VII53 The reverse Drang
174
rewriting Polish space
177
VII61 Polands new territory of flows and connections
178
VII62 Journeys to the eastern border
182
VII7 European geopolitics
185
VII71 Poland as included and excluded in Europe
186
VII72 Realist geopolitics and other discourses
189
Polish discourse on Germany
192
VIII The micropolitics of GermanPolish relations
194
VIII11 Constructions of Silesia
195
VIII12 International Park Lower Oder
197
VIII13 City partnership KreuzbergSzczeciñ
198
VIII2 Navigating the field
200
VIII21 Defining the project at different scales
201
VIII22 Relating to other institutions in the field
207
crossborder relationships
214
VIII32 Sociological and historical narratives
216
VIII33 The functional mappings of Berlin and SzczeciĔ
220
VIII4 Challenged borders and ambiguous connections
224
VIII41 Dynamic pictures segmented landscapes
225
VIII42 To connect or not to connect
227
VIII43 Natural borders or connections
229
VIII44 Borders and relationships
234
VIII45 The role of the Other
240
VIII5 Transgression and regression
244
VIII51 The transgression of borders and history
245
VIII52 The EU as a line of flight
248
VIII53 Intangible connections
252
VIII54 Universal and everyday transgression
254
the micropolitics of cooperation
257
Crossborder cooperation and the rule of transgression
261
The GermanPolish border region
265
XI References
266
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Page 16 - It would be futile to assert that an exact Science of Frontiers has been or is ever likely to be evolved: for no one law can possibly apply to all nations or peoples, to all Governments, all territories, or all climates. The evolution of Frontiers is perhaps an art rather than a science, so plastic and malleable are its forms and manifestations.
Page 18 - Frontiers are indeed the razor's edge on which hang suspended the modern issues of war or peace, of life or death to nations.
Page 19 - ... they will hardly succeed— patience and tact, initiative and self-restraint, these are the complex qualifications of the modern school of pioneers. To these attainments should be added— for the ideal Frontier officer — a taste for languages, some scientific training, and a powerful physique. The work, which he may be called upon to perform, may be that of the explorer or the administrator or the military commander, or all of them at the same time. The soldier, perhaps more often than the...
Page 5 - The point, in brief, is to transform the critique conducted in the form of necessary limitation into a practical critique that takes the form of a possible transgression.

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