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Misfortune.-Doubly disgraced.-No Effort to remove the Stain. ---Attacks on the Queen.

-An incongruous Mixture.-Specimen of the Ramsbottom Letters.—Hook's Scurrility.

-Fortune and Popularity.- The End...

..Page 405

SYDNEY SMITH.

The "wise Wit."--Oddities of the Father._Verse-making at Winchester.-Curate Life on

Salisbury Plain. – Old Edinburgh. — Its social and architectural Features. - Making

Love metaphysically.—The old Scottish Supper.-The Men of Mark passing away. The

Band of young Spirits.---Brougham's early Tenacity.-Fitting up Conversations." Old

Schools Ceremonies.—The Speculative Society. A brilliant Set.-Sydney's Opinion of

his Friends. -Holland House.-Preacher at the “Foundling."-Sydney's "Grammar

of Life."— The Picture Mania.—A Living comes at last. - The Wit's Ministry.---The

first Visit to Foston le Clay.-Country Quiet.—The universal Scratcher.-Country Life

and Country Prejudice. —The genial Magistrate. —Glimpse of Edinburgh Society.--Mrs.

Grant of Laggan.-A Pension Difficulty.—Jeffrey and Cockburn.- Craigcrook. --Sydney

Smith's Cheerfulness.--His rheumatic Armor. No Bishopric.--Becomes Canon of St.

Paul's.Anecdotes of Lord Dudley.-A sharp Reproof.–Sydney's Classification of So.

ciety.- Last Stroke of Humor...

433

GEORGE BUBB DODINGTON, LORD MELCOMBE.

A dinner-giving lordly Poet.-A Misfortune for a Man of Society.-Brandenburgh House.

“The Diversions of the Morning."-Johnson's Opinion of Foote.-Churchill and the

“Rosciad."-Personal Ridicule in its proper Light.-Wild Specimen of the Poet.-Wal-

pole on Dodington's “Diary." - The best Commentary on a Man's Life. - Leicester

House. -Grace Boyle.-Elegant Modes of passing Time. A sad Day.-What does Dod.

ington come here for? — The Veteran Wit, Beau, and Politician. - Defend us from our

Executors and Editors...

469

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

PAGE

BEAU FIELDING AND THE SHAM WIDOW......

(Frontispiece.)

24

VILLIERS IN DISGUISE_THE MEETING WITH HIS SISTER

LINE.........

DE GRAMMONT'S MEETING WITH LA BELLE HAMILTON

77 WHARTON'S ROGUISH PRESENT..

149 A SCENE BEFORE KENSINGTON PALACE–GEORGE II. AND QUEEN CARO

167 POPE AT HIS VILLA-DISTINGUISHED VISITORS..

186 A ROYAL ROBBER

210 SCARRON AND THE WITS-FIRST APPEARANCE OF LA BELLE INDIENNE 237 STRAWBERRY HILL FROM THE THAMES...

276 SELWYN ACKNOWLEDGES “THE SOVEREIGNTY OF THE PEOPLE” 322 THE FAMOUS "LITERARY CLUB"......

346 A TREASURE FOR A LADY-SHERIDAN AND THE LAWYER..

357 THE BEST THING BEAU BRUMMELL EVER SAID.

396 THEODORE HOOK'S ENGINEERING FROLIC....

417 A DROLL SCENE AT SYDNEY SMITH'S.....

448 SYDNEY SMITH'S WITTY ANSWER TO THE OLD PARISH CLERK.

453

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THE

WITS AND BEAUX OF SOCIETY.

GEORGE VILLIERS, SECOND DUKE OF BUCKINGHAM.

SAMUEL PEPYS, the weather-glass of his time, hails the first glimpse of the Restoration of Charles II. in his usual quaint terms and vulgar sycophancy.

“ To Westminster Hall,” says he; “ where I heard how the Parliament had this day dissolved themselves, and did pass very cheerfully through the Hall, and the Speaker without his mace. The whole Hall was joyful thereat, as well as themselves; and now they begin to talk loud of the king.” And the evening was closed, he further tells us, with a large bonfire in the Exchange, and people called out, “ God bless King Charles !”

This was in March, 1660; and during that spring, Pepys was noting down how he did not think it possible that “my Lord Protector,” Richard Cromwell, should come into power again; how there were great hopes of the king's arrival; how Monk, the Restorer, was feasted at Mercers' Hall; (Pepys's own especial); how it was resolved that a treaty be offered to the king, privately; how be resolved to go to sea with “my lord;" and how, while they lay at Gravesend, the great affair which brought back Charles Stuart was virtually accomplished. Then, with various parentheses, inimitable in their way, Pepys carries on his narrative. He has left his father's “cutting-room” to take care of itself; and finds his cabin little, though his bed is convenient, but is certain, as he rides at anchor with “my lord” in the ship, that the king “must of necessity come in,” and the vessel sails round and anchors in Lee Roads. "To the castles about Deal, where our fleet” (our fleet, the saucy son of a tailor!) “lay and anchored; great was the shoot of guns from the castles and ships, and our answers.” Glorious Samuel! in his element, to be sure.

Then the wind grew high: he began to be “dizzy and squeamish ;” nevertheless employed “ Lord's Day” in looking

14

SIGNS OF THE RESTORATION.

66

through the lieutenant's glass at two good merchantmen, and the women in them, “ being pretty handsome;" then in the afternoon he first saw Calais, and was pleased, though it was at a great distance. All eyes were looking across the Channel just then—for the king was at Flushing; and, though the “Fanatiques” still held their heads up high, and the Cavaliers also talked high on the other side, the cause that Pepys was bound to still gained ground.

Then“ they begin to speak freely of King Charles ;" churches in the city, Samuel declares, were setting up his arms; merchant-ships-more important in those days—were hanging out his colors. He hears, too, how the Mercers' Company were making a statue of his gracious Majesty, to set up in the Exchange. Ah! Pepys's heart is merry; he has forty shillings (some shabby perquisite) given him by Captain Cowes of the “Paragon;" and "my lord” in the evening “falls to singing" a song upon the Rump to the tune of the Blacksmith."

The hopes of the Cavalier party are hourly increasing, and those of Pepys we may be sure also; for Pim, the tailor, spends a morning in his cabin “putting a great many ribbons to a sail.” And the king is to be brought over suddenly, “my

” lord” tells him: and indeed it looks like it, for the sailors are drinking Charles's health in the streets of Deal, on their knees; " which, methinks," says Pepys, " is a little too much;" and “methinks” so, worthy Master Pepys, also.

Then, how the news of the Parliamentary vote of the king's declaration was received! Pepys becomes eloquent.

“He that can fancy a fleet (like ours) in her pride, with pendants loose, guns roaring, caps flying, and the loud' Vive le Roi !' echoed from one ship's company to another; he, and he only, can apprehend the joy this inclosed vote was received with, or the blessing he thought himself possessed of that bore it."

Next, orders come for “my lord” to sail forthwith to the king; and the painters and tailors set to work, Pepys superintending, “ cutting out some pieces of yellow cloth in the fashion of a crown and C. R.; and putting it upon a fine sheet”. and that is to supersede the States' arms, and is finished and set up. And the next day, on May 14, the Hague is seen plainly by us, “my lord going up in his night-gown into the cuddy.”

And then they land at the Hague; some “nasty Dutchmen” come on board to offer their boats, and get money, which Pepys does not like; and in time they find themselves in the Hague, “a most neat place in all respects;" salute the Queen of Bohemia and the Prince of Orange-afterward Wil

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