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whiskey or whiskeys, or straight malt whiskey or whiskeys, respectively."

(i) A blend of straight whiskeys, 4 blend of straight rye whiskeys, A blend of straight bourbon whiskeys, 4 blend of straight corn whiskeys, a blend of straight wheat whiskeys, and a blend of straight malt whiskeys are mixtures composed only of straight whiskeys, straight rye whiskeys, straight bourbon whiskeys, straight corn' whiskeys, straight wheat whiskeys, or straight malt whiskeys, respectively.

(i) Spirit whiskey is a mixture which contains at least 6% and less than 20% by volume of 100 proof straight whiskey or straight whiskeys and either (1) neutral whiskey, or (2) grain neutral spirits, or (3) neutral whiskey and grain neutral spirits; if such mixture at time of bottling is reduced to not less than 80° proof.

(k) Sootch whiskey is a distinctive product of Scotland, manufactured in Scotland in compliance with the laws of Great Britain regulating the manufacture of Scotch whiskey for consumption in Great Britain, and containing no distilled spirits less than three years old : Provided, That if in fact such product as so manufactured is a mixture of distilled spirits, such mixture is Blended Scotch whiskey (Scotch whiskey-A Blend).

(1) Irish whiskey is a distinctive product of Ireland, manufactured either in the Irish Free State or in Northern Ireland, in compliance with the laws of those respective territories regulating the manufacture of Irish whiskey for consumption in such territories, and containing no distilled spirits less than three years old: Provided, That if in fact such product as so manufactured is a mixture of distilled spirits, such whiskey is Blended Irish whiskey (Irish whiskey-A Blend).

(m) Canadian whiskey is a distinctive product of Canada, manufactured in Canada in compliance with the laws of the Dominion of Canada regulating the manufacture of whiskey for consumption in Canada, and containing no distilled spirits less than two years old: Provided, That if in fact such product as so manufactured is a mixture of distilled spirits, such whiskey is Blended Canadian whiskey (Canadian whiskey-A Blend).

(n) Process whiskey is a product (1) prepared by the treatment of grain neutral spirits or neutral whiskey by a mechanical or chemical process so as to give it the taste, aroma, characteristics, and chemical composition of any of the foregoing types of whiskey, and to which no rye or bourbon essence or similar whiskey flavoring

6 As amended by these Regulations effective as of Mar. 18, 1935. Prior to the amendment the words “100 proof" appeared after the words " 51% by volume of and before the words “ straight rye whiskey ", so appearing by virtue of an amendment on Mar. 15, 1935. Prior to the amendment of Mar. 15, 1935, class 2 (h), relating to

nded rye whiskey, etc., read as follows:

(h) Blended rye whiskey (Rye WhiskeyA Blend), Blended bourbon whiskey (Bourdon Whiskey-A Blend), Blended corn whiskey. (Corn Whiskey-A Blend), or Blended malt whiskey (Malt Whiskey-1 Blend), is blended whiskey which contains not less than 81% by volume straight rye whiskey or whiskeys, straight bourbon whiskey or whiskeys, straight corn whiskey or whiskeys, or straight malt whiskey or whiskeys, respectively."

o As amended on Mar. 15, 1935. Prior to the amendment class 2 (i), relating to a blend of straight whiskeys, etc., read as follows:

“(1) A blend of straight whiskeys, A blend of straight rye whiskeys, A blend of straight dourbon whiskeys, A blend of straight corn whiskeys, and a blend of straight malt whiskeys are mixtures composed only of straight whiskeys, straight rye whiskeys, straight bourbon whiskeys, straight corn whiskeys, or straight malt wbiskeys, respectively?"*

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material has been added, and (2) authorized by the Administration to be so designated upon application to it, including the submission of samples and chemical analyses therewith. The designation of such product shall include the phrase "Made from Grain Neutral Spirits (or Neutral Whiskey as the case may be) Especially Treated and Matured."

(0) Special types of whiskey.-Any person producing any distilled spirits which, as a result of treatment by a chemical or mechan. ical process, possess the taste, aroma, characteristics, and chemical composition, but do not conform to the definition, of any whiskey for which standards of identity are herein prescribed, may apply to the Administration for permission to designate such distilled spirits as whiskey of a type herein defined or of a type not so defined; and the Administration may take such action on such application as it deems fair and reasonable.

(P) Blended Scotch type whiskey (Scotch type whiskey-4 blend), is a mixture made outside Great Britain and composed of

(1) Not less than 20% by volume of 100 proof malt whiskey or whiskeys distilled in pot stills at not more than 160° proof, from a fermented mash of malted barley dried over peat fire, whether or not such proof is subsequently reduced prior to bottling to not less than 80° proof; and

(2) Not more than 80% by volume of neutral whiskey distilled at more than 180° proof and less than 190° proof, whether or not such proof is subsequently reduced prior to bottling to not less than 80° proof.

In lieu of including the word “Type.", the designation may in. clude the word "American ” at the beginning thereof, if produced in the United States; or corresponding wording if produced in any other country outside Great Britain."

Class 3. Gins: (a) Distilled gin is the distillate obtained by original distillation or redistillation of neutral spirits over or with juniper berries and other aromatics customarily used in the production of gin, and deriving its main characteristic flavor from juniper berries and reduced at time of bottling to not less than 80° proof; and includes mixtures solely of such distillates.

(b) Compound gin is the product obtained by mixing neutral spirits with distilled gin or gin essence or other flavoring materials customarily used in the production of gin, and deriving its main characteristic flavor from juniper berries and reduced at time of bottling to not less than 80° proof; and includes mixtures of such products.

(c) Distilled or Compound dry, London dry, Hollands, Plymouth, Geneva, Old Tom, Tom, and Buchu, gins are the types of gin known to the trade under such designations.

Class 4. Brandies: (a) Brandy is the distillate obtained solely from the fermented juice or mash of fruit distilled at less than 190° proof (whether or not such proof is further reduced prior to bottling to not less than 80° proof) in such manner that the distillate posses

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? As amended on Mar. 15, 1935, to take effect on June 1, 1935. Prior to the amendment, subsection (p) of section 21, class 2, did not appear in this article.

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ses the taste, aroma, and characteristics generally attributed to a brandy; and includes mixtures solely of such distillates.

(6) Brandy, without appropriate qualifying words, or Grape Brandy, is the distillate obtained from grape wine or wines under the conditions set forth in subsection (a) of this class, and includes inixtures of such distillates.

(c) Apple brandy (Apple jack), Peach brandy, Cherry brandy, Apricot brandy, Raisin brandy, and other fruit brandies are distillates obtained from the fermented juice or mash of the respective fresh or dried or otherwise treated fruits under the conditions set forth in subsection (a) of this class, and includes mixtures composed wholly of one kind of such distillates. The designation shall contain the name of the fruit used, and if other than fresh fruit is used, the word “Dried” or such other appropriate terms as may be approved by the Administration. Brandy derived from raisins shall be designated as Raisin brandy.

(d) Cognac and Cognac brandy is grape brandy distilled in the Cognac region of France, which is entitled to be designated as

Cognac” by the laws and regulations of the French Government; and includes mixtures of such brandy.

Class 5. Rum: ' (a) Rum is any alcoholic distillate from the fermented juice of sugarcane, sugarcane sirup, sugarcane molasses, or other sugarcane byproducts distilled at less than 190° proof (whether or not such proof is further reduced prior to bottling to not less than 80° proof) in such manner that the distillate possesses the taste, aroma, and characteristics generally attributed to a rum; and includes mixtures solely of such distillates.

(6) New England rum is rum as above defined, except that it is produced in the United States, is distilled at less than 160° proof, and is a straight rum and not a mixture of rums.

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• As amended on Mar. 15, 1935, to take effect on June 1, 1935. Prior to the amendment section 21, subsection (a) of class 4, read as follows:

(a) Brandy is the distillate obtained solely from the fermented juice or mash of fruit, distilled under such conditions that the characteristic bouquet or volatile favor and aromatic principals are retained in the distillate, and includes mixtures solely of such distillate.'

• As amended on Mar. 15, 1935, to take effect on June 1, 1935. Prior to this amendment section 21, class 5, read as follows:

“ Class 5. Rum. (a) Rum.-Rum is a distillate obtained solely from the fermented juice of sugarcane, sugarcane molasses, or other sugarcane byproducts, in such manner that the distillate possesses the taste, aroma, characteristics, and chemical composition generally attributed to rum, and known to the trade as such, and includes mixtures solely of such distillates.

“A distillate so obtained may be designated as Puerto Rican, Cuban, Demarara, Bar. bados, St. Croix, Jamaican, New England, Martinique, or any other type of rum, the designation of which has a geographical significance if (1) produced in conformity with the laws and regulations of the place of production, (2) conforming to the customary trade understanding of such type of rum, and (3) such additional type designation is in direct conjunction with the word “ Rum." Any rum designated in full compliance with all of the above requirements may be so designated, irrespective of the proof at which distilled and irrespective of whether or not rum essences customarily used in the territory of manufacture are added thereto.

“The provisions of the preceding paragraph are subject to the limitations of class 7 (a), relating to imitation rum, and are temporary in character and subject to revision upon the completion of pending investigations by the Administration as to several types of rum and imitation rum.

The foregoing provisions are the result of an earlier amendment on Oct. 6, 1934. Prior to this amendment, and as it read in the Standards of Identity as originally issued, section 21, class 5. read as follows:

“ Class 5. Rum. (a) Rum is the distillate obtained solely from the fermented Juice of sugarcane, sugarcane molasses, or other

sugarcane byproducts, in such that the distillate possesses the taste, aroma, characteristics, and chemical compositlon generally attributed to rum, and known to the trade as such, and includes mixtures solely of such distillate."

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(c) Puerto Rico, Cuba, Demarara, Barbados, St. Croix, St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, Jamaica, Martinique, Trinidad, Haiti, and San Domingo rum are not distinctive types of rum. Such names are not generic but retain their geographic significance. They may not be applied to rum produced in any other place than the particular region indicated in the name, and may not be used as a designation of a product as rum, unless such product is rum as defined in subsection (a).

Class 6. Cordials and Liqueurs: 10 (a) Cordials and Liqueurs are products obtained by mixing or redistilling neutral spirits, brandy, gin, or other distilled spirits with or over pure juices from fruits, flowers, plants, or other natural flavoring materials, or with extracts derived from infusions, percolations, or macerations of such materials, and to which sugar or dextrose or both have been added in an amount not less than 242% by weight of the finished product. Synthetic or imitation flavoring materials shall not be included. The presence of synthetic or imitation coloring materials shall be stated as follows: "Artificially colored."

The type of distilled spirits used for mixing or redistillation, and the percentage of each type thereof, may, but need not, be stated. Any such statement shall be substantially in accordance with the following examples: Apricot Liqueurthe distilled spirits used are all apricot brandy; Cherry Cordial—the distilled spirits used are all grape brandy; Pineapple Liqueur—the distilled spirits used are 30% distilled London dry gin, 70% neutral spirits.

(6) Sloe gin cordial or liqueur is a cordial or liqueur with the main characteristic flavoring derived from sloe berries. (c) Cordials and liqueurs shall not be designated as “ distilled

compound." (d) Dry cordials and Dry liqueurs.--The designation of a cordial or liqueur may include the word “Dry” if the added sugar and dextrose are less than 10% by weight of the finished product.

Class 7. Imitations: (a) General.-Imitations include distilled spirits of any class or type, containing added rye or bourbon essence or similar whisky flavoring material, or colored or flavored in such a manner as to simulate any other class or type of distilled spirits, and designated by the name of such other class or type of distilled spirits. The name of such other class or type of distilled spirits shall not be used to designate an imitation unless immediately preceded by the word “Imitation.” Subsections (6), (c), and (d) of this class specify imitations in addition to the foregoing.

or

10 As amended on Mar. 15, 1935, to take effect on June 1, 1935. Prior to this amendment, section 21, class 6, read as follows :

“ Class 6. Cordials and Liqueurs. (a) Cordials and Liqueurs are (1) the distillates (other than gin) obtained by distilling distilled spirits over or with fruits, flowers, plants, or other natural flavoring materials, and to which sugar and/or dextrose has been added, and includes mixtures wholly of one kind of such distillates or (2) the products (other than gin) obtained by mixing distilled spirits with Juices, essential oils, or other deriva. tives from fruits, flowers, plants, or other natural flavoring materials, and to which sugar and/or dextrose has been added.

"(b) sioe gin is a cordial or liqueur in which the main characteristic flavoring is derived in whole directly from sloe berries, and includes mixtures of such cordials or liqueurs.

"(c) Fruit gins, such as Pineapple gin, Orange gin, Cranberry gin, and Strawberry gin, are cordials or liqueurs in which the main characteristic flavor is derived in whole directly from the respective fruit, and includes mixtures composed wholly of one kind of such liqueurs or cordials, and shall be designated as Cordials Liqueurs."

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(6) Imitation brandy.-(1) Neutral spirits or other distilled spirits which have added thereto or which contain synthetic or imitation brandy, flavoring materials, (2) brandy which has added thereto neutral spirits or other distilled spirits than brandy, and (3) a distillate obtained from a fermented mash of fruit and sugar or dextrose, are not brandy, and the designation thereof shall not include the word “brandy unless immediately preceded by the word “ Imitation.” 11

(c) Imitation rim.-(1) Neutral spirits or other distilled spirits which have added thereto or which contain synthetic or imitation rum flavoring materials, and (2) rum which has added thereto neutral spirits or other distilled spirits than rum, are not rum, and the designation shall not include the word “rum” unless immediately preceded by the word “Imitation”: Provided, That if any such product is produced in Puerto Rico solely for sale and consumption within Puerto Rico and is labeled solely in Spanish, except for statement of net contents, then for the purposes of these regulations such product shall not be deemed an imitation until such time as is hereafter specified by the Administration. 11

(d) Imitation cordials and liqueurs.-Neutral spirits, brandy, gin, or other distilled spirits which have added thereto or which contain synthetic or imitation fruit, flower, plant, or other natural flavoring materials shall not include in the designation thereof the name of such fruit, flower, plant, or other natural flavoring material, unless immediately preceded by the word “Imitation.” The presence of synthetic or imitation coloring shall be stated as follows: “ Artificially Colored.”

(e) Harmless coloring or flavoring materials.-Notwithstanding the foregoing subsections of this class, the addition of harmless coloring or flavoring materials, such as burnt sugar and blending materials, in a total amount not in excess of 212% of the distilled spirits by volume, shall not alter the class or type of any distilled spirits, provided such coloring and flavoring materials do not have the effect of imitating any class or type of distilled spirits. Whether or not distilled spirits containing such materials in excess of such total amount are imitations shall be governed by the provisions of subsection (a) of this class.

(f) Distinctive names.-Any class or type of distilled spirits having a purely arbitrary or fanciful name which distinguishes the distilled spirits so named from all other distilled spirits and which does not simulate the designation prescribed herein or the customary trade name for any other distilled spirits, shall not be deemed an

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11 As amended on Mar. 15, 1934, to take effect on June 1, 1935. Prior to this amendment subsections (b), (c), and (d) of section 21, class 7, read as follows:

(0) Imitation Brandy.-- Mixtures of neutral spirits or other distilled spirits than brandy, with brandy or with other flavoring, materials, are not brandy and shall not contain the word 'Brandy' as part of their designation unless immediately preceded by the word 'Imitation.'

(0) Imitation Rum.--Mixtures of neutral spirits or other distilled spirits than rum, with rum or with other favoring materials, are not rum, and shall not contain the word Rum as part of their designation unless immediately preceded by the word Imitation.'

(d) Imitation Cordials and Liqueurs are cordials or liqueurs in which the main characteristic flavoring material is not derived in whole directly from a fruit, flower, plant, or other natural flavoring material, and which are designated in whole or in part by the name of any such fruit, Power, plant, or other natural flavoring material. The name of a fruit, flower, plant, or other natural flavoring material shall not be used to designate an imitation cordial or liqueur unless immediately preceded by the word Imitation."

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