Human Genetics: The Molecular Revolution

Front Cover
Begins with molecular characterization of the human genome (rather than the conventional descriptions of Mendelian inheritance, pedigree analysis, and chromosome abnormalities), and maintains this emphasis on understanding human genetics in molecular terms throughout. Suitable as a text for biology
 

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Contents

The Molecular Era
5
Summary
24
References
35
Mapping by somatic cell genetics Mapping
37
Gene Mapping by In Situ Hybridization
45
Isolation of Individual Chromosomes
50
Restriction Maps and Contig
56
References
62
SOME MOLECLILAR
202
Gene Therapy
204
Traditional Treatment Modalities
213
Growth Promoters
219
Tumor Suppressor Genes
231
Functions of ProtoOncogenes
237
The Role of Oncogenes in Tumor
244
B Cells and the Antibody Response
250

Humans
69
Linkage Analysis with Autosomal
75
Box 43 Gene Mapping by Xray Zapping
84
Identifying the Genetic Basis
91
Mutation
114
The Impact of Mutation on Disease
130
Somatic Mutation in Humans 134 Molecular Explanations of Dominance
163
Mutations Involving One or a
185
Adult Screening
192
Monoclonal Antibodies
258
The Major Histocompatibility Complex
264
Summary
270
Examples of Xlinked Diseases
285
The Mitochondrial Genome
296
Summary
302
Organization of the Human Genome
309
Summary
316
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Edwin H. McConkey is a molecular biologist who began his career in science as a herpetologist. At the University of California, Berkeley, he became interested in molecular aspects of development, which evolved into an emphasis on protein synthesis under the influence of James Watson at Harvard University. After many years at the University of Colorado, his interests focused on human genetics, and he now specializes in comparative studies on the human and chimpanzee genomes, with the goal of understanding the genetic basis of human uniqueness.

Edwin H. McConkey is a molecular biologist who began his career in science as a herpetologist. At the University of California, Berkeley, he became interested in molecular aspects of development, which evolved into an emphasis on protein synthesis under the influence of James Watson at Harvard University. After many years at the University of Colorado, his interests focused on human genetics, and he now specializes in comparative studies on the human and chimpanzee genomes, with the goal of understanding the genetic basis of human uniqueness.

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