Investigation of Concentration of Economic Power, Issue 1; Issue 4; Issues 9-11

Front Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1940
 

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Contents

Prices and quality grades for specified brands of canned foods
77
Extent of consumer brand preference for prepared foods
79
Comparison of wholesale prices of identical substances sold under proprietary and nonproprietary names
81
Comparison of retail prices of drugs cosmetics and foods with the costs of their ingredients
82
Relation of price flexibility to importance of brand preference
86
Comparison of quoted prices for sulphuric acid with prices actually paid by a large buyer
99
CHAPTER IV
109
Average retail value and sales of selected electrical appliances
112
Number sold and retail value average reali
113
Saturation of the market
118
statistical data on p 262 in appendix III
119
Household equipment ownership by income groups vacuum
126
Average expenditures by families of employed wage earners and clerical workers by economic level
130
Distributive margin of electric refrigerators
144
Distributive margins
145
Replacement sales as a percent of total sales of electric refrigerators
148
Estimated durability of electric refrigerators
149
138
155
List prices of electric refrigerators 1938principal companies
162
Percent of concentration 1937
163
Average expenditures by families of employed wage earners and clerical workers by economic level
164
Flexibility of commodity prices measured by various criteria 172189
172
Geographic Practices in American MarketsContinued
180
Flexibility of commodity prices measured by various criteria ranked in ten groups for each criterion in order of increasing flexibility 190210
190
2744 Correlation tables of commodities distributed according to their ranks by two criteria of wholesale price flexibility 211228
211
Timing of predepression peak 1929 to 1931 compared with timing of depression low 1932 to 1934
212
Timing of predepression peak 1929 to 1931 compared with post depression peak 1936 to 1938
213
Timing of depression low 1932 to 1934 compared with post depression peak 1936 to 1938
214
3134 Frequency of change compared with amplitude of cyclical move ment 215218
215
Frequency of change compared with timing of predepression peak 1929 to 1931
219
Frequency of change compared with timing of postdepression peak 1936 to 1938
221
Amplitude of cyclical movement compared with timing of predepres sion peak
222
Amplitude of cyclical movement compared with timing of depression low 1932 to 1934
223
Frequency of change compared with change per change
224
Amplitude of cyclical movement compared with change per change
225
Frequency of change compared with aggregate change less net change
227
Frequency of change compared with timing of predepression peak
237
PART III
347
CHAPTER II
355
Retail prices of nationally advertised analgesic tablets June 1929
356
Retail prices of nationally advertised analgesic tablet June 1929 to
362
Retail prices of standard liquid laxative July 1936 to March 1939
365
Retail prices of nationally advertised analgesic tablets
366
Retail prices of nationally advertised shaving article
367
Retail prices of nationally advertised cold remedy
368
substitute brands in chain and independent storesJune 1939
371
Retail prices of drug sundry nationally advertised brand and substi tute brands in chain and independent storesJune 1939
372
substitute brands in chain and independent storesJune 1939
373
stitute brands in chain and independent storesJune 1939
374
Retail prices of oral antiseptic nationally advertised brand and sub
375
distributors brands charged by two mail order houses
376
distributors brands charged by two mail order houses
377
Retail prices of liquid laxative B nationally advertised brand and distributors brands charged by two mail order houses
378
Retail prices of liquid laxative nationally advertised and substi tute brands in chain and independent stores June 1939
379
Comparison of full list prices with contractual minimum prices
383
Distribution of retail prices quoted by drug stores for 13 items selling between 10 and 50 cents
385
Wholesale and retail margins for nationally advertised pharmaceutical A
390
B
392
Wholesale and retail margins for nationally advertised drug sundry
393
Wholesale and retail margins for nationally advertised toiletry A
395
Wholesale and retail margins for nationally advertised toiletry B
396
Wholesale and retail margins for a nationally advertised toiletry C
397
Wholesale and retail margins for nationally advertised cosmetic A
398
Wholesale and retail margins for nationally advertised cosmetic B
399
Terms of sale for cosmetic C
400
Wholesale and retail markups for 8 nationally advertised products
401
Maximum and minimum retail markups for 132 products sold by a large drug manufacturergroup I
403
Maximum and minimum retail markups allowed by 12 cosmetic manufacturers on their various price lines
404
Retail margins on products in the drug trade in California under the California fair trade law July 1936
405
Minimum retail margins on selccted wellknown advertised drug products in California under the California fair trade law July 1936
406
126127
126
iiiiii
183
APPENDIX III
iii

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 48 - ... dividends upon stock of other corporations, joint stock companies or associations, or insurance companies, subject to the tax...
Page 38 - For the purpose of this section two or more domestic corporations shall be deemed to be affiliated (1) if one corporation owns directly or controls through closely affiliated interests or by a nominee or nominees substantially all the stock of the other or others, or (2) if substantially all the stock of two or more corporations is owned or controlled by the same interests.
Page 94 - personal service corporation" means a corporation whose income is to be ascribed primarily to the activities of the principal owners or stockholders who are themselves regularly engaged in the active conduct of the affairs of the corporation and in which capital (whether invested or borrowed) is not a material income-producing factor...
Page 112 - That (a) the actual cash value of patents and copyrights paid in for stock or shares in such corporation or partnership, at the time of such payment, shall be included as invested capital, but not to exceed the par value of such stock or shares at the time of such payment, and...
Page 48 - ... the amount received as dividends upon the stock or from the net earnings of any corporation, joint stock company, association, or insurance company, which is taxable upon its net income as hereinafter provided...
Page 5 - To meet the situation I have described, there should be a thorough study of the concentration of economic power in American industry and the effect of that concentration upon the decline of competition.
Page 61 - heavy industries,' changes in methods of selling, and the widening use of corporate forms of business organization are bringing, if they have not already brought, the era of competitive capitalism to a close.
Page 91 - ... higher minimums than they desired in some instances. The committees are not permitted, supposedly, by law to dictate what the minimum prices shall be, but they are doing just that by refusing to approve contracts containing prices which do not give the retailer what they consider to be a fair profit margin. In most cases the committees are insisting on a mark-up of at least 20 percent and usually 33% per cent.
Page 39 - As used in this paragraph, the term "railroad" includes a street, suburban, or interurban electric railway, or a street or suburban trackless trolley system of transportation, or a street or suburban bus system of transportation operated as part of a street or suburban electric railway or trackless trolley system. As used in this subsection (except in paragraph (3)) the term "stock" does not include nonvoting stock which is limited and preferred as to dividends.
Page 68 - ... (2) Corporations which have invested earnings in securities or other properties unrelated to their normal business activities. (3) Corporations which have advanced sums to officers or shareholders In the form of loans out of undistributed profits or surplus from which taxable dividends might have been declared. (4) Corporations, a majority of whose stock is held by a family group or other small group of individuals, or by a trust or trusts for the benefit of such groups.

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