Elementary Meteorology

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Ginn & Company, 1894 - 355 pages
 

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Page 14 - Every particle of matter, in the universe, attracts every other particle with a force, which is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.
Page 311 - These sea-breezes do commonly rise in the morning about nine o'clock, sometimes sooner, sometimes later ; they first approach the shore so gently, as if they were afraid to come near it, and ofttimes they make some faint breathings, and, as if not willing to offend, they make a halt, and seem ready to retire. I have waited many a time, both ashore to receive the pleasure, and at sea to take the benefit of it. It comes in a fine small black curl upon the water...
Page 312 - Land-breezes are as remarkable as any winds that I have yet treated of ; they are quite contrary to the sea-breezes ; for those blow right from the shore, but the sea-breeze right in upon the shore ; and as the sea-breezes do blow in the day and rest in the night, so, on the contrary, these do blow in the night and rest in the day, and so they do alternately succeed each other. For when the sea-breezes have performed their offices of the day, by breathing on their respective coasts, they, in the...
Page 312 - It comes in a fine, small, black curl upon the water, when as all the sea between it and the shore not yet reached by it is as smooth and even as glass in comparison ; in half an hour's time after it has reached the shore it fans pretty briskly, and so increaseth gradually till twelve o'clock, then it is commonly strongest, and lasts so till two or three a very brisk gale...
Page 312 - ... shore not yet reached by it is as smooth and even as glass in comparison ; in half an hour's time after it has reached the shore it fans pretty briskly, and so increaseth gradually till twelve o'clock, then it is commonly strongest, and lasts so till two or three a very brisk gale ; about twelve at noon it also veers off...
Page 27 - Calorie or kilocalorie is the amount of heat needed to raise the temperature of a kilogram of water by one degree Celsius.
Page 139 - The heat which is expended in changing a body from the solid to the liquid state, or from the liquid to the gaseous state, is called latent heat.
Page 27 - British thermal unit, the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a pound of water one degree Fahrenheit (from 63F to 64F).
Page 312 - ... o'clock in the morning, in the interval between both breezes ; for then it is commonly calm, and then people pant for breath, especially if it is late before the sea-breeze comes, but afterwards the breeze allays the heat.

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