ONE HUNDRED YEARS ' PROGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES:

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 413 - O men with sisters dear! O men with mothers and wives! It is not linen you're wearing out, But human creatures' lives! Stitch stitch stitch In poverty, hunger, and dirt, Sewing at once with a double thread, A Shroud as well as a Shirt!
Page 85 - ... a custom loathsome to the eye, hateful to the nose, harmful to the brain, dangerous to the lungs, and in the black stinking fume thereof, nearest resembling the horrible Stygian smoke of the pit that is bottomless.
Page 31 - Such was the condition of things with regard to this, and most other farm implements, at the close of the last and beginning of the present century, or till within the last forty or fifty years.
Page 227 - ENLARGED THE RESOURCES OF HIS COUNTRY, INCREASED THE POWER OF MAN, AND ROSE TO AN EMINENT PLACE AMONG THE MOST ILLUSTRIOUS FOLLOWERS OF SCIENCE AND THE REAL BENEFACTORS OF THE WORLD.
Page 227 - Not to perpetuate a name Which must endure while the peaceful arts flourish. But to show That mankind have learnt to honour those Who best deserve their gratitude, The King, His Ministers, and many of the nobles And commoners of the realm, Raised this monument to JAMES WATT, Who, directing the force of an original genius Early exercised in...
Page 24 - It will not be doubted that, with reference to either individual or national welfare, agriculture is of primary importance. In proportion as nations advance in population, and other circumstances of maturity, this truth becomes more apparent, and renders the cultivation of the soil more and more an object of public patronage.
Page 142 - Individuals who were depressed with poverty and sunk in idleness, have suddenly risen to wealth and respectability. Our debts have been paid off; our capitals have increased, and our lands trebled themselves in value. We cannot express the weight of the obligation which the country owes to this invention. The extent of it cannot now be seen.
Page 100 - Ibs. of bone dust is sufficient to supply three crops of wheat, clover, potatoes, turnips, &c., with phosphates. But the form in which they are restored to a soil does not appear to be a matter of indifference. For the more finely the bones are reduced to powder, and the more intimately they are mixed with the soil, the more easily are they assimilated.
Page 134 - No returns from the Governor of Connecticut. But we find by some accounts that the produce of this Colony is timber, boards, all sorts of English grain, hemp, flax, sheep, black cattle, swine, horses, goats, and tobacco. That they export horses and lumber to the West Indies, and receive in return sugar, salt, molasses, and rum. We likewise find that their manufactures are very inconsiderable ; the people being generally employed in tillage, some few in tanning, shoemaking, and other handicrafts ;...
Page 88 - O'er mount and vale, where never summer ray Glanced, till the strong tornado broke his way Through the gray giants of the sylvan wild ; Yet many a sheltered glade, with blossoms gay. Beneath the showery sky and sunshine mild, Within the shaggy arms of that dark forest smiled XXX.

Bibliographic information