The Works of Hubert Howe Bancroft: History of Central America. 1882-87

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A. L. Bancroft, 1887
 

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Page 529 - Granada, by the present stipulation, the perfect neutrality of the before-mentioned isthmus, with the view that the free transit from the one to the other sea may not be interrupted or embarrassed in any future time while this treaty exists; and, in consequence, the United States also guarantee, in the same manner, the rights of sovereignty and property which New Granada has and possesses over the said territory.
Page 529 - And, in order to secure to themselves the tranquil and constant enjoyment of these advantages, and as an especial compensation for the said advantages, and for the favors they have acquired by the 4th, 5th and 6th articles of this treaty, the United States guarantee, positively and efficaciously, to New Granada...
Page 737 - The discovery of an Indian passage is the true key to the maritime movements of the fifteenth and the first half of the sixteenth centuries.
Page 742 - Immediately after the passage by the Senate, at a former session, of the resolution requesting the President to consider the expediency of opening negotiations with the governments of other nations, and particularly with the Governments of Central America and New Granada...
Page 558 - Colombia, with her constantly recurring squabbles, better able to fulfil any international obligations she might assume in the premises. Without intending to cast any slur upon her, or to doubt her honorable intentions, all — herself among the number — must own that it would be extremely dangerous to lean on so weak a reed. The question therefore occurs, and must soon be solved, What is to be the future status of the Isthmus ? A strong government is doubtless a necessity, and must be provided...
Page 700 - The government of New Granada guarantees to the government of the United States that the right of way or transit across the .Isthmus of Panama, upon any modes of communication that now exist or that may be hereafter constructed, shall be open and free to the government and citizens of the United States...
Page 725 - ... bottom-width; and the expense of the inland portions would also, by reason of the greater depth of excavation, be increased in a still higher ratio. Colonel Childs seems sensible of the inadequacy of a canal of the proposed dimensions, but thinks that by changes in model, etc., ships of great size could be built to pass a 17-foot canal.
Page 656 - They are chiefly found upon the Pacific ranges or groups of mountains, while the gold- washings, if not the gold mines proper, are most numerous on the Atlantic slope. The silver is found in various combinations, with iron, lead, copper, and, in a few instances, with antimony. Chlorides of silver are not uncommon, and rank among the richest ores in the country.
Page 529 - The United States guarantee, positively and efficaciously, to New Granada, by the present stipulation, the perfect neutrality of the before-mentioned Isthmus, with the view that the free transit from the one to the other sea may not be interrupted or embarrassed in any future time while this treaty exists...
Page 728 - They conclude that, judging from the data, without presuming to vouch for their accuracy, the work is practicable, "and would not be attended with engineering difficulties beyond what might naturally be expected in a work of this magnitude ;" that the surveys have every appearance of accuracy, and they are satisfied of the perfect fairness and candor of Colonel Childs ; that the works are generally sufficient for the purpose they are intended to answer ; and " that the estimates, upon the present...

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