The life of Samuel Johnson, Volume 2

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User Review  - browsers - LibraryThing

One of the best books to just start browsing. I probably pick this up for a 20-minute entertainment as much as any other in my library. Read full review

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User Review  - MrsLee - LibraryThing

Obviously, this rating is for myself alone. Two stars in my library means that I did not like the book, but that someone else might. In this case, I found Boswell to fawning for my enjoyment, and ... Read full review

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Page 721 - No man was more foolish when he had not a pen in his hand, or more wise when he had.
Page 777 - The busy day, the peaceful night, Unfelt, uncounted, glided by; His frame was firm, his powers were bright, Though now his eightieth year was nigh. Then, with no throbs of fiery pain, No cold gradations of decay, Death broke at once the vital chain, And freed his soul the nearest way.
Page 728 - It may indeed be observed, that in all the numerous writings of Johnson, whether in prose or verse, and even in his Tragedy, of which the subject is the distress of an unfortunate Princess, there is not a single passage that ever drew a tear.
Page 545 - SIR, — That which is appointed to all men is now coming upon you. Outward circumstances, the eyes and the thoughts of men, are below the notice of an immortal being about to stand the trial for eternity before the Supreme Judge of heaven and earth. Be comforted : your crime, morally or religiously considered, has no very deep dye of turpitude. It corrupted no man's principles ; it attacked no man's life. It inv-olved only a temporary and reparable injury.
Page 561 - Why, Sir, you find no man, at all intellectual, who is willing to leave London. No, Sir, when a man is tired of London, he is tired of life ; for there is in London all that life can afford.
Page 736 - It may be justly supposed that there was in his conversation, what appears so frequently in his letters, an affectation of familiarity with the great, an ambition of momentary equality sought and enjoyed by the neglect of those ceremonies which custom has established as the barriers between one order of society and another. This transgression of regularity was by himself and his admirers termed greatness of soul. But a great mind disdains to hold any thing by courtesy, and therefore never usurps...
Page 645 - Why, yes, Sir; it is to be admired. I value myself upon this, that there is nothing of the old man in my conversation. I am now sixty-eight, and I have no more of it than at twenty-eight.
Page 455 - No servants will attend you with the alacrity which waiters do, who are incited by the prospect of an immediate reward in proportion as they please. No, sir ; there is nothing which has yet been contrived by man, by which so much happiness is produced as by a good tavern or inn.
Page 650 - ... I shall not be in town to-morrow. I don't care to know about Pope.' MRS. THRALE (surprised as I was, and a little angry) : ' I suppose, sir, Mr. Boswell thought, that as you are to write Pope's Life, you would wish to know about him.' JOHNSON: 'Wish! why yes. If it rained knowledge, I'd hold out my hand ; but I would not give myself the trouble to go in quest of it.
Page 499 - Mr. Wilkes was very assiduous in helping him to some fine veal. "Pray give me leave, Sir: — It is better here — A little of the brown — Some fat, Sir — A little of the stuffing — Some gravy — Let me have the pleasure of giving you some butter — Allow me to recommend a squeeze of this orange; — or the lemon, perhaps, may have more zest." — "Sir, Sir, I am obliged to you, Sir...

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