Luis Leal: An Auto/Biography

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University of Texas Press, 2000 - 210 pages
Professor Luis Leal is one of the most outstanding scholars of Mexican, Latin American, and Chicano literatures and the dean of Mexican American intellectuals in the United States. He was one of the first senior scholars to recognize the viability and importance of Chicano literature, and, through his perceptive literary criticism, helped to legitimize it as a worthy field of study. His contributions to humanistic learning have brought him many honors, including Mexico’s Aquila Azteca and the United States’ National Humanities Medal. In this testimonio, or oral history, Luis Leal reflects upon his early life in Mexico, his intellectual formation at Northwestern University and the University of Chicago, and his work and publications as a scholar at the University of Illinois and the University of California, Santa Barbara. Through insightful questions, Mario García draws out the connections between literature and history that have been a primary focus of Leal’s work. He also elicits Leal’s assessment of many of the prominent writers he has known and studied, including Mariano Azuela, William Faulkner, Octavio Paz, Carlos Fuentes, Juan Rulfo, Gabriel García Márquez, Jorge Luis Borges, Tomás Rivera, Rolando Hinojosa, Rudolfo Anaya, Elena Poniatowska, Sandra Cisneros, Richard Rodríguez, and Ana Castillo.
 

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Contents

Acknowledgments
ix
Introduction
xi
Linares
1
Chicago
19
Mississippi and Emory
49
Illinois
63
AzdanPart One
97
Aztlan Part Two
137
Santa Barbara
163
Work and Reflections at Ninety
187
Notes
197
Selected Bibliography of Luis Leals Works
199
Index
203
Copyright

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Page viii - there be three times, past, present, and to come:" yet perchance it might be properly said, "there be three times; a present of things past, a present of things present, and a present of things future.

About the author (2000)

Mario T. García is Professor of Chicano Studies and History at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

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