The Miscellaneous Writings and Speeches of Lord Macaulay

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Longmans, Green, and Company, 1889 - 784 pages

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Page 421 - When a murmuring sound broke out, and swelled into a shout Among the godless horsemen upon the tyrant's right. And hark! like the roar of the billows on the shore, The cry of battle rises along their charging line! For God! for the cause! for the Church! for the laws!
Page 439 - To my true king I offered free from stain Courage and faith ; vain faith, and courage vain. For him, I threw lands, honours, wealth, away, And one dear hope, that was more prized than they. For him I languished in a foreign clime, Grey-haired with sorrow in my manhood's prime ; Heard on Lavernia Scargill's whispering trees, And pined by Arno for my lovelier Tees ; Beheld each night my home in fevered sleep, Each morning started from the...
Page 97 - Artaxerxes' throne; To sage Philosophy next lend thine ear, From heaven descended to the low-roofed house Of Socrates, see there his tenement, Whom well inspired the oracle pronounced Wisest of men; from whose mouth issued forth Mellifluous streams that watered all the schools Of Academics old and new, with those Surnamed Peripatetics, and the sect Epicurean, and the Stoic severe...
Page 157 - ... proceed far, before their progress is indicated by any public measure. An intimate knowledge of the domestic history of nations is therefore absolutely necessary to the prognosis of political events. A narrative, defective in this respect, is as useless as a medical treatise which should pass by all the symptoms attendant on the early stage of a disease and mention only what occurs when the patient is beyond the reach of remedies.
Page 591 - Lord John Russell moved for a Committee of the whole House to take into consideration the state of Ireland.
Page 155 - He considers no anecdote, no peculiarity of manner, no familiar saying, as too insignificant for his notice which is not too insignificant to illustrate the operation of laws, of religion, and of education, and to mark the progress of the human mind.
Page 271 - And this is the more extraordinary because he did not seclude himself from the public gaze like those Oriental despots whose faces are never seen, and whose very names it is a crime to pronounce lightly. It has been said that no man is a hero to his valet; and all the world saw as much of Louis XIV.
Page 156 - ... coquetry, the caprice, the petty malice of Anne, the haughty and resolute spirit of Henry. We have no hesitation in saying that a great artist might produce a portrait of this remarkable woman at least as striking as that in the novel of Kenilworth, without employing a single trait not authenticated by ample testimony.
Page 156 - But a truly great historian would reclaim those materials which the novelist has appropriated. The history of the government, and the history of the people, would be exhibited in that mode in which alone they can be exhibited justly, in inseparable conjunction and intermixture. We should not then have to look for the wars and votes of the Puritans in Clarendon, and for their phraseology in Old Mortality ; for one half of King James in Hume and for the other half in the Fortunes of Nigel.
Page 240 - When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him.

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