The Art of Correspondence: English and French

Front Cover
Meline, Cans and Company, (etc., etc.), 1850
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

From a son expressing his satisfaction with his employ
24
The fathers answer
26
Réponse du père
27
From a gentleman to a friend announcing an accident
28
From a lady just married to her friend
30
Reply
34
Réponse
35
From a gentleman requesting a favour
36
The friends answer complying
38
The friends answer refusing
40
Answer
44
Réponse
45
To wish a happy new year
46
From a gentleman going to London
48
Complaining of long silence
50
Answer
52
Réponse
53
Informations on going to London
54
Answer
58
Réponse
59
From a gentleman in London
60
On duelling
64
A loccasion dun duel
65
Announcing the illness of a son
66
On a journey to Marseilles
68
To a nephew
72
Answer 16
74
On a young man who frequented gam bling houses
76
On the English language
78
To excuse a person
80
Answer
82
To propose a shooting excursion
84
Answer
86
Réponse
87
To ask advice on marriage
88
Answer
90
On an accident at a shooting party
92
Answer
96
Advice concerning the English language
98
Answer
100
From a friend at London
102
From a young man requesting permission to learn drawing
104
For obtaining a situation
108
To a friend after a journey
110
Concerning want of punctuality
112
Advice on going to London
116
To ask a favour
120
Answer
122
To a young man on breaking his word
124
To a young man on early rising
128
From a young man who had offended his father
130
The fathers answer
132
From an Englishman residing in France
134
To ask advice after an imprudence
140
Answer
144
From a young nian who had lost money at a gambling house
146
Answer
148
From a young man dissatisfied with his situation
152
From a young lady to her mamma
154
Dune jeune dame à sa mère
155
Invitation to pass a winter at Paris
156
Answer
158
From a young man just arrived at New York
162
Another letter from the same
164
A proposal to exchange sons for a time
166
cards notes etc
186
Lord Chesterfield to Madam
194
Lord Chesterfield à madame
195
to S Dayrolles Esq
198
JII to Madam
200
to Madame de Tencin
202
From Lord Byron to T Moore Esquire
204
Lord Chesterfield to Madame de Tencin
206
Lord Byron to Doctor Pigot
208
Lord Byron to Mr Dallas
210
Lady Montague to Lady Rich
212
Lord Byron to T Moore
214
Lord Byron to Walter Scott
216
Walter Scott to Lord Byron
220
Lord Byron 10 Mr Hopner
222
Lady Montague to the Countess of Mar
224
to Mr Pope
226
From Mr Pope to Lady Montague
228
From Mr Shenstone to a friend
230
From Lady Catesby to Lady Campley
232
Madaine de Sévigné to Mr de Pompone
234
Mr Sterne to Mr Foley at Paris
236
to Mr Foley
240
M Sterne à M Foley à Paris 257
241
to Mrs F
242
XXIJI From W Irving to the editor of a Maga zine
244
Mr Sterne lo Mrs Sterne
246
to Mr Panchard
248
to the same
250
to his banker at Paris Ib XXVIII 10 Mrs Sterne
254
From Sam Foote to his mother
258
Mr Sterne to Mr Foley at Paris Ib XXX From J Howell Esq lo H W
260
From the same to the same
262
to Mr R Floyd
264
to Mr W B Ib XXXIV to Mr Stone
266
Mr Locke to Mr Molyneux
270
Dr Molyneux to Mr Locke
272
Le docteur Molyneux à M Locke
273
From Mr Pope lo H Cromwell Esq
274
Mr Addison to Mr Pope
276
From the celebrated Dr Franklin to a young lady on the death of her squir rel
278
Mr Steele to Mr Pope
282
Mr Sheridan to Mr John King
284
Mr Gray to the Duke of Grafton Ib XLIII Dr Herring Archbishop of Canterbury to W Duncombe
286
to W Duncombe
288
Dr Johnson to Miss Boothby
290
From Mr J Hooke to Mr Spencer
292
From Dr Johnson to Miss Boothby
296
Dr Johnson to Mr Elphinstone
298
From Mr D Hume to a friend
300
Lord Byron to his mother
304
An order with news of a failure
318
Commande avec avis dune faillite
319
Answer of the wholesale dealer
324
To request payment of an account
352
Pour demander le payement dun compte
353
The attorneys answer
362
Reply to the complaint
368
Advice concerning different articles
374
EXPLICATION sur des lettres de change
377
MODELS of Bills of Exchange Parcels Accounts current
380
VOCABULARY of commercial terms
403
Tableau des monnaies anglaises réduites en argent
413
TABLE of English money reduced to French currency
414
Réponse pour accuser réception de

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 235 - Il faut que je vous conte une petite historiette, qui est très-vraie, et qui vous divertira. Le roi se mêle depuis peu de faire des vers ; MM. de Saint-Aignan et Dangeau lui apprennent comment il faut s'y prendre. Il fit l'autre jour un petit madrigal , que lui-même ne trouva pas trop joli. Un matin il dit au maréchal de Gramont : M.
Page 235 - Le maréchal, après avoir lu, dit au roi : Sire, Votre Majesté juge divinement bien de toutes choses ; il est vrai que voilà le plus sot et le plus ridicule madrigal que j'aie jamais lu.
Page 235 - Monsieur le maréchal, lisez, je vous prie, ce petit madrigal, et voyez si vous en avez jamais vu un si impertinent. Parce qu'on sait que depuis peu j'aime les vers, on m'en apporte de toutes les façons.
Page 218 - ... with a tone and taste which gave me a very high idea of his abilities and accomplishments, which I had hitherto considered as confined to manners, certainly superior to those of any living gentleman.
Page 296 - Having carried on my work thus far with so little obligation to any favourer of learning, I shall not be disappointed though I should conclude it, if less be possible, with less ; for I have been long wakened from that dream of hope, in which I once boasted myself with so much exultation. My Lord, your lordship's most humble, most obedient servant,
Page 10 - Its first and fundamental requisite is, to be natural and simple ; for ,a stiff and laboured manner is as bad in a Letter as it is in Conversation. This does not banish sprightliness and wit. These are graceful in Letters, just as they are in Conversation ; when they flow easily, and without being studied ; when employed so as to season, not to cloy. One who, either in Conversation or in Letters, affects to shine and to sparkle always, will not please long. The style of Letters should not be too...
Page 107 - Le verbe coûter, étant neutre, n'a point de participe ; cepen» dant plusieurs personnes écrivent : Les vingt mille francs que ' cette maison m'a COÛTÉS ; les efforts que ce travail m'a COÛTÉS, la «peine qu'il m'a COÛTÉE. L'exactitude grammaticale exige : Les » vingt mille francs que cette maison m'a COÛTÉ ; Les efforts, la « peine , que ce travail m'a COÛTÉ.
Page 207 - ... d'oser me déterminer à vous envoyer cette lettre. Je sentais toute l'indiscrétion d'une telle démarche, et à quel point c'était abuser de la bonté que vous avez eue pour moi pendant mon séjour à Paris, que de vous la redemander pour un autre; mais sollicité vivement par une dame, que son mérite met à l'abri des refus, et porté d'ailleurs à profiter du moindre prétexte pour rappeler un souvenir qui m'est si précieux que le vôtre, le penchant, comme il arrive presque toujours,...
Page 207 - VIII, 98. écrit-il, j'ai longtemps balancé avant que d'oser me déterminer à vous envoyer cette lettre. Je sentais toute l'indiscrétion d'une telle démarche, et à quel point c'était abuser de la bonté, que vous avez eue pour moi pendant mon séjour à Paris, que de vous la redemander pour un autre ; mais, sollicité vivement par une dame, que son mérite met à l'abri des refus, et porté, d'ailleurs, à profiter du moindre prétexte, pour rappeler un souvenir qui m'est si précieux que le...
Page 218 - He said his own opinion was nearly similar. In speaking of the others, I told him that I thought you more particularly the poet of Princes, as they never appeared more fascinating than in Marmion and the Lady of the Lake.

Bibliographic information