Life of Johnson, Volume 2

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H. Frowde, 1904
 

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Page 133 - We were now treading that illustrious island, which was once the luminary of the Caledonian regions, whence savage clans and roving barbarians derived the benefits of knowledge, and the blessings of religion. To abstract the mind from all local emotion would be impossible if it were endeavoured, and would be foolish if it were possible.
Page 387 - See, what a grace was seated on this brow : Hyperion's curls; the front of Jove himself; An eye like Mars, to threaten and command ; A station like the herald Mercury New-lighted on a heaven-kissing hill ; A combination, and a form, indeed, Where every god did seem to. set his seal, To give the world assurance of a man : This was your husband.
Page 412 - Stillingfleet 2 , whose dress was remarkably grave, and in particular it was observed, that he wore blue stockings. Such was the excellence of his conversation, that his absence was felt as so great a loss, that it used to be said, ' We can do nothing without the blue stockings;' and thus by degrees the title was established.
Page 541 - I therefore, the prisoner of the Lord, beseech you that ye walk worthy of the vocation wherewith ye are called, with all lowliness and meekness, with longsuffering, forbearing one another in love ; endeavouring to keep the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace.
Page 25 - Italy, is always conscious of an inferiority, from his not having seen what it is expected a man should see. The grand object of travelling is to see the shores of the Mediterranean. On those shores were the four great Empires of the world ; the Assyrian, the Persian, the Grecian, and the Roman. All our religion, almost all our law, almost all our arts, almost all that sets us above savages, has come to us from the shores of the Mediterranean.
Page 410 - ... from a lucky hitting upon what is strange : sometimes from a crafty wresting obvious matter to the purpose. Often it consisteth in one knows not what, and springeth up one can hardly tell how.
Page 643 - Kates, and Jennies, All the names that banish care ; Lavish of your grandsire's guineas, Show the spirit of an heir. "All that prey on vice and folly Joy to see their quarry fly : There the gamester, light and jolly, There the lender, grave and sly.
Page 26 - Then, Sir, what is poetry ? ' JOHNSON. ' Why, Sir, it is much easier to say what it is not. We all know what light is ; but it is not easy to tell what it is.
Page 437 - And sure the eternal Master found His single talent well employ'd. The busy day, the peaceful night, Unfelt, uncounted, glided by; His frame was firm, his powers were bright, Though now his eightieth year was nigh. Then, with no throbs of fiery pain, No cold gradations of decay, Death broke at once the vital chain, And freed his soul the nearest way.
Page 404 - Biron they call him; but a merrier man, Within the limit of becoming mirth, I never spent an hour's talk withal : His eye begets occasion for his wit; For every object that the one doth catch, The other turns to a mirth-moving jest ; Which his fair tongue (conceit's expositor,) Delivers in such apt and gracious words, That aged ears play truant at his tales, And younger hearings are quite ravished ; So sweet and voluble is his discourse.

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