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LIQUID AIR IN DERMATOLOGY: ITS INDICATIONS AND LIMITATIONS. By Henry H. Whitehouse, M.D., New York. Reprinted from Journal American Medical Association, August 3, 1907.

AN UNUSUALLY EXTENSIVE FOLLICULITIS: ITS CONNECTION WITH SO-CALLED TUBERCULIDES. By William B. Trimble, M.D., New York. Reprinted from Journal of Cutaneous Diseases, June, 1907.

THE ETIOLOGY OF CERTAIN CASES OF LEFT-SIDED INTRA-ABDOMINAL SUPPURATION-ACUTE DIVERTICULITIS. By George Emerson Brewer, M.D., New York. Reprinted from American Journal of Medical Sciences, October, 1907. THE TREATMENT OF GONORRHOEAL EPIDIDYMITIS. By Julius J. Valentine, M.D., New York. Reprinted from New York Medical Journal, July 27,

1907.

First District Branch of the Medical Society of the State of New York.First annual meeting, held October 28, 1907, the President, Dr. Charles E. Nammack, in the chair.

DIFFICULTIES OF PROCURING PURE MILK.

Dr. H. J. Shelley of Middletown read this paper. He said that in Middletown the attempt had been to get macroscopical rather than microscopical clean milk, and examinations of the farms and dairies had been made. Much has been accomplished by the various boards of health, but the amount of legislation yet to be enacted was appalling. Cleanliness was the great thing aimed at. In the summer of 1906 the conditions were such that the Health Officer made a visit to most of the dairies supplying the city with milk, and then existing conditions were brought be

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fore the local board. Notices to clean up and keep clean were issued. In the fall of 1906 a milk ordinance was passed, which brought about better conditions on the farms and a purer milk for the consumer. The milk producer had to issue a statement to the Board of Health, as follows: Where was the dairy located? How many persons were employed? Were they all in good health? If not, what was the nature of the disease or affection? How was the stable lighted, ventilated and drained? Were the walls whitewashed, and how often? How often did they clean the stable? How many cubic feet of air space did the cow stable contain? How often and where did they remove manure? What did they use for bedding? How many cows did they usually keep? Did they know they

were all healthy? What did they feed them when not in pasture? Did they keep the cows clean, and how? Did they clean the udder and surrounding parts before milking? Did they use milking garments? Where did they keep the cans during milking? Where was the milkroom located with respect to the stables? How did they clean their cans, pails and utensils? Did they do anything to sterilize them? If so, what? What was the source of water supply and where was it situated? Did they dispose of their milk? If so, to whom? Did they peddle their own milk from wagons? Rules and regulations were issued by the Board of Health. The room in which the cows were kept should contain at least 500 cubic feet for each cow housed therein, and should be ventilated and lighted and have a dry, well-drained floor, and be cleaned each day, the manure being removed at least 20 feet from the barn at each cleaning. The ceiling and side walls should be whitewashed twice each year and be kept free from dust, cobwebs and filth at all times. No swine should be kept in the same room with the cows. No musty or dirty litter should be used for bedding. The food and water given the cows should be at all times pure and wholesome and subject to the approval of the Board of Health. All cows 'should be free from stable filth and loose dirt, and the milkers should have clean hands and clothing at the time of milking. Milk should be removed immediately after being drawn from each cow to a wellventilated milk room separate from the stable-room, and there aerated and cooled before being placed in cans. Milk should be strained through a cotton flannel or other equally efficient strainer, which should be renewed as often as necessary to be efficient. All strainers should be cleansed and sterilized after each milking.

All vessels having contained milk should be washed clean and sterilized after each milking or using. Milk delivered in bottles should be bottled in the milkroom, at the dairy or creamery, and bottles should be cleaned and sterilized at the dairy or creamery, even though having been washed by the customers, and no milk should be sold dipped from cans and poured into other vessels. No milk bottles, tickets or other things should be taken from a house while it was under quarantine for a contagious disease. No milk tickets should be used by customers more than once. All wagons, sleighs or other vehicles from which milk was delivered should be kept cleaned in a manner satisfactory to the Board or its authorized agent. All wagons upon which milk was brought from the dairy or from which it was delivered to customers should be kept covered to protect the milk from the rays of the sun, in a manner satisfactory to the Board or its authorized agent. In closing he quoted Dr. Henry Enos Tully as follows: "What has been said goes to prove that the problems involved in the production of a pure market milk are difficult of solution. Eternal vigilance, elimination of politics, a well-equipped laboratory, with a competent head of that department ; veterinary inspection, proper laws and ordinances, education of the public and a public demand for pure milk, milk commissions, and education of dairymen, soliciting their co-operation rather than antagonism, may produce a fairly good supply. However, it cannot be too forcibly impressed that there may be adequate laws governing chemical standards, etc.; no good will be accomplished until inspection can be carried to the dairy, there to include regulation of everything pertaining to the herd, feed, production and handling of milk and its shipment and handling until it reaches the consumer."

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4a Allgemeine Wiener Medizinische Zei-
tung. Vienna. W., $6-50c.

6 American Journal of Dermatology and
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58a Deutsche Medizinische Wochenschrift. 68 Hahnemannian Monthly. Philadelphia. Berlin. W., $7.20-25c.

$3-30c.

68a Heilkunde. Vienna. M., $3-30c.
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64d Gazetta Medica Lombarda. Palermo. W., $4.50-20c.

64e Gazette Médicale de Paris. France. M., $1.50-25c.

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64k Gaz. Med. di Roma R

Semi-m.,

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66c Giornale Italiano d. Malat. Ven. ed. Pel
le Milan. Bi-m., 18 lire.
67 Good Health. Battle Creek. M., $1-
10c.

67a Hahnemannian Advocate. Chicago.
M., $2.50-25c.

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78d Journal des Maladies Cutanées et Syphilitiques. Paris. M., $4-40c.

W.,

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