The American Dictionary of Criminal Justice: Key Terms and Major Court Cases

Front Cover
Scarecrow Press, 2005 - 513 pages
2 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
The Third Edition of The American Dictionary of Criminal Justice in hardback is an ideal reference volume for libraries, agencies, and offices that serve those who need ready access to criminal justice information. Like any good dictionary, this resource will assist practitioners as well as students in writing reports and papers and understanding terminology in journal articles. Over 5,000 terms, concepts, and names are included in the new edition, as well as over 125 new U.S. Supreme Court cases. The dictionary's interdisciplinary approach greatly enhances its effectiveness as a "one-stop" resource. Students will no longer need to waste precious study time seeking out definitions in numerous specialized sources. Many definitions are accompanied by examples from the research literature, illustrating how the terms apply in particular contexts. Key terms cut across the following areas: criminal law, criminal justice, forensics, gangs, computers and computer crime, criminal investigations, criminology, criminological theory, corrections, probation and parole, courts and sentencing, rules of criminal procedure, constitutional law, policing and police-community relations, jails and prisons, white-collar crime, sodomy laws, civil rights, tort law, victimization, juvenile law, Section 1983 actions, capital punishment, electronic surveillance, fines and asset forfeiture, deadly force, search and seizure, wrongful convictions, the Prison Litigation Reform Act of 1995, and the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996. The dictionary includes numerous illustrations, figures, and tables that provide users with visual portrayals of important criminal justice facts. A comprehensive listing of over 30 doctoral programs in criminal justice is provided, together with useful contact information. An extensive listing of Internet sites is provided for locating useful information regarding important topics associated with law enforcement, the courts, and corrections. Also featured are listings of all pr
 

What people are saying - Write a review

Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

Great gift

User Review  - Gina F. - Overstock.com

Bought one for my neice and her boyfriend who are criminal justice majors. They use it all the time in their studies. Read full review

Good school guide

User Review  - Gina F. - Overstock.com

Bought these for my neice and her boyfriend who are criminal justice majors. They use them all the time in rheir studies. Read full review

Contents

Reading Citations in Cases
275
Cases
279
Summary of Case Index Topics
469
Case Index by Topic
471
References
489
Appendices
491
PhD Programs in Criminal Justice
493
Internet Connections
495
Criminological Theory
498
Juvenile Justice
499
Recidivism Research
501
Selected Professional Organizations and Agencies
502
Federal and State Probation and Parole Agencies
504
Regional Departments of Corrections Telephone Fax and Internet Contacts
512

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2005)

Dean John Champion is professor of criminal justice at Texas A&M International University in Laredo, TX. Dr. Champion has taught at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, California State University-Long Beach, and Minot State University.
He has written more than 30 texts and edited works and maintains memberships in 11 professional organizations. He is a lifetime member of the American Society of Criminology, the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, and the American Sociological Association. He is former editor of the ACJS/Anderson series on Issues in Crime and Justice (1993-1996) and the Journal of Crime and Justice (1995-1998). He is a contributing author for the Encarta Encyclopedia 2000 for Microsoft. He was the visiting scholar for the National Center for Juvenile Justice in 1992 and is president of the Midwestern Criminal Justice Association.

Bibliographic information