A Tour Through the Highlands of Scotland, and the Hebride Isles in MDCCLXXXVI

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J. Walter, 1787 - 379 pages
 

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Page 1 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses, whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings. Far from me and...
Page 108 - Out of one of the beds on which we were to repose started up, at our entrance, a man black as a Cyclops from the forge.
Page 26 - In, Length of the cave from the rock without - 371 6...
Page 21 - ... of folid unformed rock, above thefe, the ftratum which reaches to the foil or furface of the ifland, varied in thicknefs, as the ifland itfelf formed into hills or vallies...
Page 21 - Compared to this what are the cathedrals or the palaces built by men! mere models or playthings, imitations as diminutive as his works will always be when compared to those of nature.
Page 22 - Hill more agreeable, the whole is lighted from without ; fo that the fartheft extremity is very plainly feen from without, and the air within being agitated by the flux and reflux of the tides, is perfectly dry and wholefome, free entirely from the damp vapours with which natural caverns in general abound.
Page 21 - ... arrived than we were struck with a scene of magnificence which exceeded our expectations...
Page 34 - ... as if the fabric of the world had been in great diforder. He did not think there had been fo many people in the world as in the city of Glafgow ; and it was a great myftery to him to think what they could all defign by living fo many in one place.
Page 62 - ... from the whole, though he often thinks proper to deny it to particulars ; yet this partial failure (for which we fee no natural...
Page 35 - ... with iron nails, he could not forbear laughing, and thought it the most ridiculous thing that ever fell under his observation. He longed to see his native country again, and passionately wished it were blessed with ale, brandy, tobacco, and iron, as Glasgow was.

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