The English Change Network: Forcing Changes into Schemas

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Walter de Gruyter, 2013 M07 5 - 426 pages

This book introduces the notion of change construction and systematically studies, within a Cognitive Grammar framework, the rich inventory of its instantiations in English, from well-known structures such as the so-called resultative construction to a variety of largely ignored types such as asymmetric resultatives, sublexical change constructions and mildly causal constructions.

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Contents

32 Gestalt versus partwhole properties
155
33 Summary
159
4 Interim conclusion
161
41 Transitivity
162
42 Resultative adjectives
165
The Force Change Schema and the Event Change Schema
173
1 The Force Change Schema
174
11 Subcategorised objects
175

3 Preview
24
Resultative constructions and change constructions
27
11 Transitive resultative constructions
28
12 Intransitive resultative constructions
33
13 Conceptual distance
40
14 Paraphrases for the resultative construction
42
15 Summary
43
2 The billiardball model
44
22 States and positions
45
23 Reverse causal ordering
47
24 Causality and manipulable entities
49
25 A first schematic representation
52
26 Summary
59
3 The change phrase
60
32 Sublexical change
63
33 LIKE change constructions
70
34 Prepositional phrases and phrasal verbs
72
35 Summary
76
Asymmetric resultatives and the change complex
79
1 Transitivity
80
12 The Direct Object Restriction
82
13 Some problematic data
86
14 Summary
91
21 Allative and ablative prepositions
92
22 Prepositions in the change complex
100
23 The problematic examples
105
24 Summary
107
When properties are not in the eye of the beholder
109
33 Goldbergs 1995 Unique Path Constraint
115
4 Conclusion
117
Motion and idiosyncrasy
119
1 The motion scenario
120
11 The motion scenario is evoked by the construction
121
12 The motion scenario is evoked by the verb
124
13 Summary
129
2 Tight links and information retrieval
130
22 Linking events
135
3 Lexical variation
137
31 Wechslers 2001 approach
140
Abovethenorm reading and tight links
178
13 Mild causality and specification
201
14 Goldbergs 1995 analysis
211
2 The Event Change Schema
218
21 Temporal coextensiveness
219
22 Temporal sequencing
227
23 The transitive Event Change Schema and subject orientation
229
3 Conclusion
238
The Event Force Change Schema and verb classes
241
1 The Event Force Change Schema
242
12 The noncausal variant
247
2 The lack of object orientation
252
21 On satisfaction and love
253
22 to the point of
260
23 Partwhole variants
264
3 On indeterminacy and complexity
271
4 Verb classes
274
41 Middle verbs
278
42 Verbs of manner of motion
279
43 Verbs of accompaniment
281
44 Emission verbs
284
45 Verbs of transformation and creation
289
5 Conclusion
292
atconstructions
297
1 The conative alternation
298
12 Van der Leeks 1996 analysis
303
2 The allative and ablative scenarios
309
Necessary contact without translational motion
314
Translational motion with necessary contact
319
3 Pesetskys 1995 paradox
323
4 Conclusion
326
Conclusion
329
2 Summary
330
Notes
351
References
379
Sources of examples
389
Index
391
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About the author (2013)

Cristiano Broccias teaches at the Universities of Genova and Pavia, Italy.

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