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WORKS BY PROFESSOR BERNHARD TEN BRINK.

EARLY ENGLISH LITERATURE.

Vol. I. To Wyclif. Translated into English by Horace

M. KENNEDY. 35. 6d. Vol. II. Wyclif, Chaucer, Earliest Drama, Renaissance.

Translated by W. CLARKE ROBINSON, Ph.D. 35. 6d. Vol. III. From the Fourteenth Century to the Death of BOHN'S STANDARD LIBRARY

Surrey. Translated by L. DORA SCHMITZ. 35. 6.1. "It is an immense gain that the most authoritative account of a very important century of English literature is at last accessible in an English dress; and we are delighted to welcome it.”—Journal of Education.

A volume which no student of English literature can afford to neglect, that no reader will hasten to lay down."-Educational Review.

The account given of Chaucer is, in combined breadth and delicacy, in keen comprehension both of the man and of the contemporary conditions by which his life and work were determined, unsurpassed, if it be equalled.”—Professor Herford, in The Bookman.

“This luminous and authoritative history of an interesting period in our literature.”Guardian.

“The volume as a whole will greatly increase the estimation in which Professor Ten Brink's name and authority are held by all students of English literature."-Scotsmin.

35. 6.1.

FIVE LECTURES ON SHAKESPEARE. Trans

lated by Julia FRANKLIN. "A study of Shakespeare and his work by one of the most learned and competent of foreign authorities on English literature."Times.

“These genuinely inspiring lectures . .. make one of the best short introductions to the spirit of Shakespeare that has ever been written.”Manchester Guardian.

“This volume represents the ripest thought of a peculiarly diligent and sympathetic student of our literature. Professor Ten Brink not only worthily maintains the traditions of German Shakesperian criticism from Lessing onwards, but also satisfies the expectations aroused by his c'assical volumes on our early writers. It would be, perhaps, rash to say that the present account of Shakespeare is so remarkable as his incomparable study of Chaucer, but that is due rather to the intrinsic difficulty of extracting such valuable critical ore from so well-worked a mine rather than to any diminution of his accustomed penetration and thoroughness.” —Cambridge Review.

LONDON: GEORGE BELL AND SONS,

YORK STREET, COVENT GARDEN.

HISTORY OF

ENGLISH LITERATURE

(FROM THE FOURTEENTH CENTURY TO THE

DEATH OF SURREY)

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