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" HAD rather believe all the fables in the legend, and the Talmud, and the Alcoran, than that this universal frame is without a mind: and, therefore, God never wrought miracles to convince atheism, because his ordinary works convince it. "
Essays, Moral, Economical, and Political - Page 82
by Francis Bacon - 1812 - 295 pages
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England: With a Life of the ...

Francis Bacon, Basil Montagu - 1848
...little credit with him. when he thus began one of his essays, ' I had rather believe all the fables la the Legend, and the Talmud, and the Alcoran, than that this universal frame is without a mind.' " 1 have a copy of this edition. A letter of the Lord Bacon's, In French, to the Marquess Flat, relating...
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The Harvard Classics, Volume 3

1909
...XVI OF ATHEISM I HAD rather believe all the fables in the Legend,1 and the Talmud," and the Alcoran,3 than that this universal frame is without a mind. And therefore God never wrought miracle to convince* atheism, because his ordinary works convince it. It is true, that a little philosophy...
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The Papers of Andrew Johnson: 1822-1851

Andrew Johnson, United States. President (1865-1869 : Johnson) - 1967 - 752 pages
...digests them need not dread to encounter iron, adamant, fish hooks, and glass bottles. I could sooner believe all the fables in the Legend, and the Talmud, and the Koran, than that the doctrines of Calvin have any foundation in truth. Brownlow's Exposition and...
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Complete Writings: With Variant Readings

William Blake - 1966 - 944 pages
...can he except Factious is Christianity. Page 75- OfAlhetsm. I had rather believe all the fables and the legend, and the Talmud, and the Alcoran than that this universal frame is without a wind : and, therefore, God ne1er wrought miracle to convince atheism, because his ordinary works convince...
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Improvement Era, Volume 4, Issue 1

1901
...City, and is to be had for the small sum of $1.00. NOTES. Discretion in speech is more than eloquence. God never wrought miracles to convince atheism, because his ordinary works convince it. Fame is like a river, that heareth np things light and swollen, and and drown things weighty and solid....
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Space and the Eighteenth-Century English Novel, Volume 1

Simon Varey - 1990 - 220 pages
...been flourishing for some time. In his essay 'Of Atheism' (1613) Francis Bacon said he preferred to believe 'all the fables in the Legend, and the Talmud,...is without a mind. And therefore God never wrought miracle to convince atheism, because his ordinary works convince it.'60 Later, opponents of Epicureanism...
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The Story of Philosophy

Will Durant - 1961 - 543 pages
...philosophy is secular and rationalistic, he makes an eloquent and apparently sincere disclaimer of unbelief. "I had rather believe all the fables in the Legend,...than that this universal frame is without a mind. ... A little philosophy inclineth a man's mind to atheism; but depth in philosophy bringeth men's minds...
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The Columbia Dictionary of Quotations

Robert Andrews - 1993 - 1092 pages
...silence at the stars. WALT WHITMAN (1819-921. US poet. When 1 Heard the Leam'd Astronomer. ATHEISM 1 I had rather believe all the Fables in the Legend,...than that this universal frame is without a Mind. FRANCIS BACON (1561-1626). English philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, 'Of Atheism" (1597-1625)....
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Francis Bacon: The Temper of a Man

Catherine Drinker Bowen - 1993 - 245 pages
...stay for an answer." Or on death: "Men fear death, as children fear to go in the dark." Or on atheism: "I had rather believe all the fables in the Legend,...than that this universal frame is without a mind." Consider the opening line of the essay on gardens, in lighter vein but bearing again that touch of...
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Famous Lines: A Columbia Dictionary of Familiar Quotations

Robert Andrews - 1997 - 625 pages
...DONNE, (c. 1572-1631) British divine, metaphysical poet. "The Progress of the Soul," St. 52. Atheism 1 I had rather believe all the fables in the Legend,...without a Mind; and, therefore, God never wrought miracle to convince atheism, because his ordinary works convince it. FRANCIS BACON, (1561-1626) British...
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