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" Live you ? or are you aught That man may question ? You seem to understand me, By each at once her choppy finger laying Upon her skinny lips. — You should be women, And yet your beards forbid me to interpret That you are so. "
THE LIFE OF SAMUEL JOHNSON, LL.D - Page 91
by JAMES BOSWELL - 1892
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The dramatic works of William Shakspeare, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1813
...and fair a day I have not seen. Bon. How far is't call'd to Fores? — What are these, So withcr'd, and so wild in their attire ; That look not like the inhabitants o'the earth, And yet are on't? Live you ? or are you aught That man may question? Yon seem to understand...
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Elegant extracts in poetry, Volume 2

Elegant extracts - 1816 - 490 pages
...wilt come no more, Never, never, nerer, never, never. § 29. MACBETH. SHAKSPEARE. JPitchei detailed. WHAT are these. So wither'd, and so wild in their...not like the inhabitants o' the earth, And yet are on 't ? — Live you, or are you aught That man may question ? You seem to understand me, By each at...
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Shakespeare and His Times: Including the Biography of the Poet ..., Volume 2

Nathan Drake - 1817
...than belongs to the vulgar herd of witches. " What are these," exclaims the astonished Banquo, — " What are these, So wither'd, and so wild in their...like the inhabitants o' the earth, And yet are on't ? Live you ? or are you aught 1 * To the traditions of Boethius and Holinshed, we may add a modern...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: With the Corrections ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1817
...Enter MACBETH ami BANQUO. Mii-li. So foul and fair a day 1 have not seen. Ban. How far is't call'd to Fores ?— What are these, So wither'd, and so...their attire ; That look not like the inhabitants o' th' earth, And yet are on't ? — Live you ? or are you aught That man may question ? You seem to understand...
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Macbeth, and King Richard the Third: An Essay, in Answer to Remarks on Some ...

John Philip Kemble - 1817 - 188 pages
...struck, on their first encountering three objects of so grotesque and haggard an appearance. Banq. What are these, So wither'd, and so wild in their attire,— That look not like the inhabitants of the earth, And yet are on't!—Live you ? or are you aught That man may question ?J * Remarks, p....
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Characters of Shakespear's Plays

William Hazlitt - 1817 - 392 pages
...extraordinary. From the first entrance of the Witches and the description of them when they meet Macbeth, " What are these So wither'd and so wild in their attire. That look not like the inhabitants of th' earth And yet are on't?" .,. the mind is prepared for all that follows. This tragedy is alike...
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Blackwood's Magazine, Volume 66

1849 - 802 pages
...TALBOYS. '' Macbeth. So foul and fair a day I have not seen. Bunquo. How far ia't call'd to Forres i— What are these, So wither'd, and so wild in their attire; That look not like the inhabitants of the earth, And yet are on't ! Lire you i or are you anght That man may question ? You seem to understand...
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Blackwood's Magazine, Volume 28

1830 - 1018 pages
...in two divisions of equal weights, over the hurdies of Surefoot. And now, we must be jogging. " But what are these, So wither'd and so wild in their attire ; That look not like th* inhabitants o' the earth, And yet are on't ? Live yon ? or are you aught That man may question...
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Letters from the North Highlands, During the Summer 1816

Elizabeth Isabella Spence - 1817 - 744 pages
...magic imagery of Shakespear was before me. The Weird Sisters, with Hecate at their head, " So withered, and so wild in their attire, That look not like the inhabitants of earth," I fancied I beheld, when the guard of the mail-coach pointed out the spot where we are told...
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Characters of Shakespeare's Plays

William Hazlitt - 1818 - 342 pages
...extraordinary. From the first entrance of the Witches and the description of them when they meet Macbeth, — " What are these So wither'd and so wild in their attire, That look not like the inhabitants of th' earth And yet are on't ?" the mind is prepared for all that follows. This tragedy is alike distinguished...
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