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" My hold of the colonies is in the close affection which grows from common names, from kindred blood, from similar privileges, and equal protection. These are ties which, though light as air, are strong as links of iron. "
The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke: A vindication of natural ... - Page 507
by Edmund Burke - 1889
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Celebrated Speeches of Chatham, Burke, and Erskine: To which is Added, the ...

William Pitt (Earl of Chatham) - 1841 - 548 pages
...For that service, for all service," said Mr. Burke ; " whether of revenue, trade, or empire, my irust is in her interest in the British Constitution. My hold of the colonies is in the close aflection which grows from common names, from kindred blood, from similar privileges, and equal protection....
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Lectures on Modern History: From the Irruption of the Northern ..., Volume 2

William Smyth - 1841 - 518 pages
...For all service, whether of revenue, trade, or empire, my trust is in the interest which America has in the British constitution. My hold of the colonies is in the close affection which grows from the common names, from kindred blood, from similar privileges, and equal protection. These are ties,...
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The Church of England quarterly review, Volume 10

1841 - 534 pages
...around him, urging the necessity of governing America by affection—by that affection which "growsfrom common names, from kindred blood, from similar privileges, and equal protection." These are links, light as air and strong as iron. Had the voice of Burke been listened to, the genius of the...
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Cyclopædia of English literature, Volume 2

Robert Chambers - 1844 - 746 pages
...you. An English man is the unfittest person on earth to argue another Englishman into slavery. * * to the eye and imagination. Точпд Loclànrar. [From • Marmion.'] аз air, are as strong as links of iron. Let the colonies always keep the idea of their civil rights...
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Celebrated Speeches of Chatham, Burke, and Erskine: To which is Added, the ...

William Pitt (Earl of Chatham) - 1845 - 558 pages
...constitutional burden to support the parent state. — " For that service, for all service," said Mr. Burke; "whether of revenue, trade, or empire. my trust is...which grows from common names, from kindred blood, frbm similar privileges, and equal protection. These are ties which, though light as air, are as strong...
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The Wisdom and Genius of the Right Hon. Edmund Burke: Illustrated in a ...

Peter Burke - 1845 - 490 pages
...when, in a case of constitutional difficulty, I consult the genius of the English constitution For that service, for all service, whether of revenue, trade, or empire, my trust is in her (America's) interest in the British constitution. My hold of the colonies is in the close affection...
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Notes and Queries

1921 - 1154 pages
...— .The following must belong to some work between 17UO-1770. Are they from Pitt's speeches? 1. " My hold of the colonies is in the close affection...names, from kindred blood, from similar privileges and «• | iu 1 protection. " These are ties which, though light as air, are as strong as links of iron."...
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An Oration Delivered at Concord: On the Celebration of the Seventy-fifth ...

Robert Rantoul - 1850 - 144 pages
...to us from Greece or Rome. Less than a month it was, before the 19th of April, 1775, that he said, " My hold of the colonies is in the close affection...names, from kindred blood, from similar privileges, and from equal protection. These are ties which, though light as air, are strong as links of iron." These...
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Cyclopedia of English Literature: a Selection of the Choicest ..., Volume 2

Robert Chambers - 1851 - 764 pages
...betray you. An English man is the unnttest person on earth to argue anothe Englishman into slavery. * * ard, not a funeral note, As his corpse to the rampart...hurried ; Not a soldier discharged his farewell «hot Thest are ties which, though light as air, are as strong as links of iron. Let the colonies always...
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The Literary Reader: For Academies and High Schools: Consisting of ...

Arethusa Hall - 1851 - 422 pages
...he lives to see nothing that shall vary the prospect, and cloud the setting of his day! * * * # * # My hold of the colonies is in the close affection...grows from common names, from kindred blood, from similar-privileges, and equal protection. These are ties which, though light as air, are as strong...
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