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" My hold of the colonies is in the close affection which grows from common names, from kindred blood, from similar privileges, and equal protection. These are ties which, though light as air, are strong as links of iron. "
The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke: A vindication of natural ... - Page 507
by Edmund Burke - 1889
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Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America, 1775

Edmund Burke - 1900 - 138 pages
...be considerable in her quarter of the globe. There she may serve you, and serve you essentially. For that service, for all service, whether of revenue,...My hold of the colonies is in the close affection 20 which grows from common names, from kindred blood, from similar privileges, and equal protection....
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Burke's Speech on Conciliation with the Colonies (March) 22, 1775)

Edmund Burke - 1895 - 156 pages
...serve you, and serve you essentially. 20 For that service, for all service, whether of revenue, ffacTe, or empire, my trust is in her interest in the British Constitution. My_ jiold_of the Colonies is in the close affection which grows from common names, from kindred blo"6d7from...
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Conciliation with the American Colonies

Edmund Burke - 1896 - 106 pages
...be considerable in her quarter of the globe. There she may serve you, and serve you essentially. For that service, for all service, whether of revenue,...colonies is in the close affection which grows from 1 According to the Navigation Laws, American products could not be exported to foreign countries direct,...
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Edmund Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America

Edmund Burke - 1896 - 248 pages
...There she may serve you, and serve you essentially. *><&'**''' ' * j [Peroration.'} 137. For that service, for all service, whether of revenue,...British Constitution. My hold of the Colonies is in the 35 close affection which grows from common names, from kindred blood, from similar privileges, and...
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The Modern Review, Volume 9

Ramananda Chatterjee - 1911 - 778 pages
...these ^s is sentiment. England's hold on her Colonies is, as Burke pointed out long, long ago, "in the close affection which grows from common names,...blood, from similar privileges, and equal protection." This was true at the time of Burke; it is partly true even today. But many things have happened since...
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Burke's Speeches and Letters on American Affairs

Edmund Burke - 1911 - 318 pages
...up his plea for conciliation, in . words applicable perhaps to more than one modern \ controversy, "is in the close affection which grows : from common names, from kindred blood, from similar I privileges, and equal protection. These are ties which, i though light as air, are as strong as links...
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The Passing of War: A Study in Things that Make for Peace

William Leighton Grane - 1912 - 304 pages
...race would now appear before the world as an undivided people. " My hold on the colonies," he cried, " is in the close affection which grows from common...blood, from similar privileges, and equal protection. There are ties which though light as air, are strong as links of iron. Let the Colonies always keep...
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Warwick's Keystone Commonwealth: A Review of the History of the Great State ...

Charles Franklin Warwick - 1913 - 454 pages
...hearts of the British people. The following speech by Edmund Burke is in like strain : "My hold in the colonies is in the close affection which grows...protection. These are ties which though light as air, are strong as links of iron. Let the colonies always keep the idea of their several rights' associated...
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How to Argue Successfully: An Exposition of the Principles and Methods of ...

W. Macpherson - 1914 - 130 pages
...proposition that our hold of the colonies must be based on their interest in the British Constitution and on "the close affection which grows from common names,...blood, from similar privileges, and equal protection." In the preceding summary it has not been attempted to convey any idea of the imaginative and emotional...
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The New York Times Current History, Volume 2

1915 - 1376 pages
...be involuntarily mustered and taxed for imperial purposes, Burke said: Our hold on the colonies is the close affection which grows from common names,...similar privileges, and equal protection. These are the tie* which, though light as air, are strong ns links of Iron. Let the colonies always keep tlie...
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